Zoom won't anti-alias, except at 100%

Explorer ,
Nov 10, 2020 Nov 10, 2020

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Up until recently, when I opened an image in Photoshop then viewed it at 100%, it was anti-aliased (without jagged edges). And when I zoomed in/out, I had no problem with anti-aliasing.

But now, when I view an image at any magnification -- except 100% (or 50% or 25%) -- it has jagged edges. Obviously, some setting has changed, but I have no idea which one. 

What I find weird is that I can view any image at any magnification, without aliasing,
in Bridge or my web browser! If anyone can help me sort this out I would much appreciate it.

 

a.JPGb.JPG

 

 

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Performance, Problem or error, Windows

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New Here ,
Jul 09, 2021 Jul 09, 2021

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I have the exact same problem and dont find any solution 😕

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 09, 2021 Jul 09, 2021

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When you view zoom to 100% you are viewing your Image actual pixels but most likely not at the resolution you will print the image. The displayed image will be different size then the printed image. However, the pixels displayed have the quality you get from your camera and how well your edit  you image pixels to maintain image quality.  When you zoom to any other percentage you are not viewing your image.   You are viewing a  different image that Photoshop  has created by scaling you image to have a different number of Pixels a different size canvas for you to view.   The scaling  Adobe does zooming is not done for best image quality  using some fancy interpolation method it is done as quickly as possible so zooming will be responsive so you will be happy with Photoshop performance.   At some percentages the image quality  can be quite poor.   However, none of the zoomed images is your actual image. When edit at a zoom percentage how Photoshop applies the edits to your actual image is what counts.  You should never judges a book by its cover you should view the actual book at 100% page view and Print it at print resolution you want to judge the image quality at.

 

If you have a High PPI resolution displaye  with a relolution around 300ppi  you can judge print quality on you display  for the image resolution will be nearly the same printed and on your display.

 

Other Photoshop features do similar things for example when you transform a layer size the image displayed  in the Transform bounding box is a quickly scaled preview. When you commit the transform  you will see Photoshop actually perform the actual transform the image quality will improve and be better them the preview you saw when while you were activity using the tool.

JJMack

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 09, 2021 Jul 09, 2021

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Could you please post screenshots with the pertinent Panels (Toolbar, Layers, Options Bar, …) visible? 

 

Does turning off »Use Graphics Processor« in the Performance Preferences (Photoshop > Preferences > Performance > Graphic Processor Settings) and restarting Photoshop have any bearing on the issue? 

Does turning on »Deactivate Native Canvas« (Photoshop > Preferences > Technology Previews) and restarting Photoshop have any bearing on the issue? 

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