Converting to CMYK using Photoshop Elements

New Here ,
Oct 03, 2016 Oct 03, 2016

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I need to be able to convert to CMYK, but I'm not able to in my current version of Photoshop, which version do i need ?

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correct answers 1 Correct answer

Enthusiast , Oct 03, 2016 Oct 03, 2016
Elements doesn't support CMYK, that's the reason. Yes, you can use Photoshop CC.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 03, 2016 Oct 03, 2016

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I'm not able to in my current version of Photoshop

Will you let us know which version that is?

As far as I know any Photoshop (proper) version since version 2 could convert images to CMYK, so what about the image – what are its Color Mode and Bit Depth?

Could you please post a screenshot with the pertinent Panels (Layers, Channels, Options Bar, …) visible?

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Mentor ,
Oct 03, 2016 Oct 03, 2016

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Hi

Also : Supply pertinent information for quicker answers.

The more information you supply about your situation, the better equipped other community members will be to answer. Consider including the following in your question:

Adobe product and version number.

Operating system and version number.

What you were doing when the problem occurred.

Full screenshots of the problem.

Computer hardware, such as CPU, GPU, amount of RAM.

And more importantly, what's your end goal?

Thank you.

Pierre

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 03, 2016 Oct 03, 2016

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Why do you want to convert your image to CMYK?

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Enthusiast ,
Oct 03, 2016 Oct 03, 2016

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If you've Photoshop Elements, you just need a full version of Photoshop.

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New Here ,
Oct 03, 2016 Oct 03, 2016

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My current version is 'Adobe Photoshop Elements 7', my pictures needs to be printed in a catalogue, and that requirers CMYK.

I can see that there is a version called 'Photoshop CC' - is this the one ?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 03, 2016 Oct 03, 2016

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and that requirers CMYK.

Which CMYK Space exactly?

Unless you have a clearly stated target space handing off profiled RGB images would seem to make more sense.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 03, 2016 Oct 03, 2016

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Supply your images as RGB and let the publisher/designer/printer do any conversion to CMYK.

This is important.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 03, 2016 Oct 03, 2016

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Supply your images as RGB and let the publisher/designer/printer do any conversion to CMYK.

Some printers (for newspapers in particular) may require the data to be sent separated.

But unless they specify the CMYK target space that requirement would indeed be pretty much nonsensical.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 03, 2016 Oct 03, 2016

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Why nonsensical?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 03, 2016 Oct 03, 2016

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When the printer does not specify the CMYK space one basically has to guess which one tho use.

And while the chosen one may fit the needs it may also be considerably off, for example ISO Coated v2 could seriously overshoot the TAC if the actual printing process was newsprint.

Not to mention that Photoshop’s default CMYK space is not particularly useful in much of the world but inexperienced users might just go with that.

The printer could naturally re-separate a profiled CMYK image (CMYK-to-CMYK) but the loss of quality might be noticeable.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 03, 2016 Oct 03, 2016

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Converting to CMYK yourself is the worst possible outcome. It'll often mean converting CMYK to CMYK or CMYK to RGB, imagine the loss of quality.

For more information read this from some of the world's greatest experts: http://indesignsecrets.com/import-rgb-images-indesign-convert-cmyk-export.php

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 03, 2016 Oct 03, 2016

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I am aware of the involved issues.

Sometimes it does make sense to separate.

Edit: But of course only if the target space is known.

Not only for proofing, but because of other issues (banding for example) as well.

Like I said in particular with newsprint – the small gamut of ISOnewspaper26v4 for example may cause considerable changes in appearance of an image, in which case it may be better to make the choice of Render Intent oneself instead of leaving it up to the printer.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 03, 2016 Oct 03, 2016

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But I agree that in general handing of profiled RGB images is better and for actual print PDFS we usually do place RGB images and separate on PDF Export.

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New Here ,
Nov 07, 2021 Nov 07, 2021

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Thank you that makes sense.

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Enthusiast ,
Oct 03, 2016 Oct 03, 2016

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Elements doesn't support CMYK, that's the reason. Yes, you can use Photoshop CC.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 03, 2016 Oct 03, 2016

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You can use Photoshop (instead of PS Elements) for optimising your images but please don't convert them yourself to CMYK.

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New Here ,
Nov 01, 2021 Nov 01, 2021

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When uploading book covers to Ingram Spark which prints their books using offset printing you HAVE to convert it to CMYK. This is not an option. They will not do it for you. They tell you that you must upload the coverdesign in CMYK and if you do not do that their system just rejects the file and you are stuck.

I have Pholoshop Elements 13 but cannot do it on that.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 01, 2021 Nov 01, 2021

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quote

When uploading book covers to Ingram Spark which prints their books using offset printing you HAVE to convert it to CMYK. This is not an option. They will not do it for you. They tell you that you must upload the coverdesign in CMYK and if you do not do that their system just rejects the file and you are stuck.

I have Pholoshop Elements 13 but cannot do it on that.


By @Artist-Writer+

 

This old discusson gives excellent advice and excellent explanations from the best experts of color management. My advice won't be from a color and printing expert, it will be from an old PSE user who has been a customer of offset printing services with the advice of design studios. In a nutshell, those offset printing providers are the only ones to know exactly about their technical printing process, I mean inks and papers. At best, they can provide 'profiles' for users with the right softwares to give them CMYK files, generally in pdf format. Those users have to trust those profiles which have anyway the drawback of losing some 30% of the colours in the original RGB photos. As a customer, I would never have trusted a supplier refusing to do the conversion; it's their job, their responsability; and it's natural that this job is not for free.

In this conversation, you'll see that often, the designers provide not only the CMYK files, but also the original RGB files for controlling the test outputs.

You can see that even those experts have different choices, so it would be totally insane to provide CMYK conversion for the users of PSE.

For me, a supplier refusing to do the conversion for a reasonable price would be on my black list.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 03, 2016 Oct 03, 2016

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So there you have it OP.

Keep your images in RGB. It means they have the widest gamut (you loose around a third of the color when you convert to CMYK).

Remember the RGB color mode is correct (1) for websites (2) for your desk-top color printer, which will come with its own software to convert it to CMYK (or more depending on the model) (3) photo bureaux can use the mode and do their own color conversion, and (4) commercial litho printers will convert the images when they are included in publications etc they print to the space most suitable for the substrate.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 03, 2016 Oct 03, 2016

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Remember the RGB color mode is correct (1) for websites

Allow me to nitpick here: It is not the RGB Color Mode as such, but the sRGB Color Space that should ascertain a fairly reliable result for web purposes.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 03, 2016 Oct 03, 2016

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True, but most browsers don't have color management.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 03, 2016 Oct 03, 2016

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Derek Cross wrote:

True, but most browsers don't have color management.

Actually they do, all of them have a functioning color management engine. Even Internet Explorer.

The problem is that it's poorly implemented in most browsers, to the point where it can be considered broken. And the fact that many websites are coded so that they strip any embedded profile, and the fact that many images are posted without an embedded profile. This is what the browsers can't handle - except Firefox.

And for this reason, web material should be sRGB because that will display roughly right even without functional color management.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 11, 2016 Oct 11, 2016

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D Fosse wrote:

Derek Cross wrote:

True, but most browsers don't have color management.

Actually they do, all of them have a functioning color management engine. Even Internet Explorer.

                                                                                                                     ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

I love how you stressed IE as if it is extraordinary that it actually works.   It's a good job Noel isn't still posting, or the two of you would be going off on one all over again!   It was the dreadful way the forum software worked with IE (Noel's favourite browser) that caused Noel to leave the forum.

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