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Background erasing

New Here ,
Jul 09, 2020

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Is there a simpler way to erase behind a complicated object (like a leafy tree) than clicking the "erase" tool in every little opening of the tree? Thanks... Karl Osolinski

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by hatstead | Adobe Community Professional

The Magic wand tool sometimes works well for this. On the tool's option bar, uncheck "contiguous." The default tolerance  is 32, but you may have to lower this value. Once you have it set up, left click on a visible area and hit delete on yhe keyboard.

Another way is to use a mask, and then with a small black brush paint over the area between the leaves. If you go too far, correct with a white brush. Black hides, white reveals.

If you are trying to replace a drab sky, there is an advanced technique. You will need your original file, and a picture of a nice blue sky with clouds, nothing else on it. You can take it yourself or obtain one from another source:

1. Open your picture and the picture for the replacement sky

2. With your picture open, copy/paste the new sky. It will come in on a new layer

3. In the Layers palette, drag the new sky over the 

your picture. Activate the Move tool and with the corner handles resize and position the replacement sky to fit on top of the drab sky to the top of the tree canopy. Still on the sky l;ayer, set the blending mode to darken.

4. Set your foreground color chip to white. Activate the Gradient tool, and drag a foreground to transparent linear gradient from south to north, while holding down the shift key on the keyboard.

 

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Background erasing

New Here ,
Jul 09, 2020

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Is there a simpler way to erase behind a complicated object (like a leafy tree) than clicking the "erase" tool in every little opening of the tree? Thanks... Karl Osolinski

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by hatstead | Adobe Community Professional

The Magic wand tool sometimes works well for this. On the tool's option bar, uncheck "contiguous." The default tolerance  is 32, but you may have to lower this value. Once you have it set up, left click on a visible area and hit delete on yhe keyboard.

Another way is to use a mask, and then with a small black brush paint over the area between the leaves. If you go too far, correct with a white brush. Black hides, white reveals.

If you are trying to replace a drab sky, there is an advanced technique. You will need your original file, and a picture of a nice blue sky with clouds, nothing else on it. You can take it yourself or obtain one from another source:

1. Open your picture and the picture for the replacement sky

2. With your picture open, copy/paste the new sky. It will come in on a new layer

3. In the Layers palette, drag the new sky over the 

your picture. Activate the Move tool and with the corner handles resize and position the replacement sky to fit on top of the drab sky to the top of the tree canopy. Still on the sky l;ayer, set the blending mode to darken.

4. Set your foreground color chip to white. Activate the Gradient tool, and drag a foreground to transparent linear gradient from south to north, while holding down the shift key on the keyboard.

 

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Jul 09, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 09, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

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The Magic wand tool sometimes works well for this. On the tool's option bar, uncheck "contiguous." The default tolerance  is 32, but you may have to lower this value. Once you have it set up, left click on a visible area and hit delete on yhe keyboard.

Another way is to use a mask, and then with a small black brush paint over the area between the leaves. If you go too far, correct with a white brush. Black hides, white reveals.

If you are trying to replace a drab sky, there is an advanced technique. You will need your original file, and a picture of a nice blue sky with clouds, nothing else on it. You can take it yourself or obtain one from another source:

1. Open your picture and the picture for the replacement sky

2. With your picture open, copy/paste the new sky. It will come in on a new layer

3. In the Layers palette, drag the new sky over the 

your picture. Activate the Move tool and with the corner handles resize and position the replacement sky to fit on top of the drab sky to the top of the tree canopy. Still on the sky l;ayer, set the blending mode to darken.

4. Set your foreground color chip to white. Activate the Gradient tool, and drag a foreground to transparent linear gradient from south to north, while holding down the shift key on the keyboard.

 

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