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Cropping mishap?

Community Beginner ,
Aug 18, 2019

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Silly question here...I have been cropping photos to a size of about 20×16 or 11×14. When the photo was all done being edited, I saved. Now I am going in and looking at the image size and they are double the size and the psi resolution is defaulting to somewhere around 100 or 150. All of them are this way. If I change the resolution to 300 and decrease the image size to say, 11x14 will this decrease my image quality. I just went in and dug at what could have changed. I have always done it this way and it has always defaulted to 300 psi when looking at the image size later. Well, I went in to crop another photo and realized that while i was dragging the cropping tool, the spot below where 300 psi is normally listed, it was blank. So what happened to my photos by cropping them all that way? Do I need to redo all these photos? Is resizing the image to 300 psi really getting me back the quality? What makes the image size double in inches by doing it this way. Like I said, I get in there to resize and the inches of my photo are doubled from what I chose and the psi is half. Do I need to start over?

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by hatstead | Adobe Community Professional

For printing, it is desirable to have the resolution in the 240-300 px/in range. For web work 72 px/in is ok.

The physical size (height & width) changes as one manipulates the resolution.

Bottom line for your purpose:

On the crop tool's option bar, enter the height & width, and enter the resolution.

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Cropping mishap?

Community Beginner ,
Aug 18, 2019

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Silly question here...I have been cropping photos to a size of about 20×16 or 11×14. When the photo was all done being edited, I saved. Now I am going in and looking at the image size and they are double the size and the psi resolution is defaulting to somewhere around 100 or 150. All of them are this way. If I change the resolution to 300 and decrease the image size to say, 11x14 will this decrease my image quality. I just went in and dug at what could have changed. I have always done it this way and it has always defaulted to 300 psi when looking at the image size later. Well, I went in to crop another photo and realized that while i was dragging the cropping tool, the spot below where 300 psi is normally listed, it was blank. So what happened to my photos by cropping them all that way? Do I need to redo all these photos? Is resizing the image to 300 psi really getting me back the quality? What makes the image size double in inches by doing it this way. Like I said, I get in there to resize and the inches of my photo are doubled from what I chose and the psi is half. Do I need to start over?

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by hatstead | Adobe Community Professional

For printing, it is desirable to have the resolution in the 240-300 px/in range. For web work 72 px/in is ok.

The physical size (height & width) changes as one manipulates the resolution.

Bottom line for your purpose:

On the crop tool's option bar, enter the height & width, and enter the resolution.

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68

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Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Aug 18, 2019 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 19, 2019

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For printing, it is desirable to have the resolution in the 240-300 px/in range. For web work 72 px/in is ok.

The physical size (height & width) changes as one manipulates the resolution.

Bottom line for your purpose:

On the crop tool's option bar, enter the height & width, and enter the resolution.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

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Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
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Aug 19, 2019 0