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jpeg saving opptions

New Here ,
Jun 04, 2012

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When I save an image as a jpeg, there are three opptions: 1. Baseline Standard, 2. Baseline Optimised, 3. Progresive. Can anyone explain the differences apart from file size?

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by Jeff Arola | Adobe Community Professional

From the photoshop help manual:

"

In the JPEG Options dialog box, select the options you want, and click OK.

Matte
Offers matte color choices to simulate the appearance of background transparency in images that contain transparency.
Image Options
Specifies the image quality. Choose an option from the Quality menu, drag the Quality pop-up slider, or enter a value between 0 and 12 in the Quality text box.
Format Options
Specifies the format of your JPEG file. Baseline (“Standard”) uses a format recognized by most web browsers. Baseline Optimized creates a file with optimized color and a slightly smaller file size. Progressive displays a series of increasingly detailed versions of the image (you specify how many) as it downloads. (Not all web browsers support optimized and Progressive JPEG images.)"


In my experience almost all browers people use now support the Baseline Optimized option, which is what i usually use if the jpeg is bound for the web.
Those format options don't really mean much if your not planning to use the jpeg on the web and you'll get even smaller file sizes by using File>Save for Web
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jpeg saving opptions

New Here ,
Jun 04, 2012

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When I save an image as a jpeg, there are three opptions: 1. Baseline Standard, 2. Baseline Optimised, 3. Progresive. Can anyone explain the differences apart from file size?

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by Jeff Arola | Adobe Community Professional

From the photoshop help manual:

"

In the JPEG Options dialog box, select the options you want, and click OK.

Matte
Offers matte color choices to simulate the appearance of background transparency in images that contain transparency.
Image Options
Specifies the image quality. Choose an option from the Quality menu, drag the Quality pop-up slider, or enter a value between 0 and 12 in the Quality text box.
Format Options
Specifies the format of your JPEG file. Baseline (“Standard”) uses a format recognized by most web browsers. Baseline Optimized creates a file with optimized color and a slightly smaller file size. Progressive displays a series of increasingly detailed versions of the image (you specify how many) as it downloads. (Not all web browsers support optimized and Progressive JPEG images.)"


In my experience almost all browers people use now support the Baseline Optimized option, which is what i usually use if the jpeg is bound for the web.
Those format options don't really mean much if your not planning to use the jpeg on the web and you'll get even smaller file sizes by using File>Save for Web
TOPICS
Import and export

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Jun 04, 2012 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 04, 2012

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From the photoshop help manual:

"

In the JPEG Options dialog box, select the options you want, and click OK.

Matte
Offers matte color choices to simulate the appearance of background transparency in images that contain transparency.
Image Options
Specifies the image quality. Choose an option from the Quality menu, drag the Quality pop-up slider, or enter a value between 0 and 12 in the Quality text box.
Format Options
Specifies the format of your JPEG file. Baseline (“Standard”) uses a format recognized by most web browsers. Baseline Optimized creates a file with optimized color and a slightly smaller file size. Progressive displays a series of increasingly detailed versions of the image (you specify how many) as it downloads. (Not all web browsers support optimized and Progressive JPEG images.)"


In my experience almost all browers people use now support the Baseline Optimized option, which is what i usually use if the jpeg is bound for the web.
Those format options don't really mean much if your not planning to use the jpeg on the web and you'll get even smaller file sizes by using File>Save for Web

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Jun 04, 2012 4
LEGEND ,
Jun 04, 2012

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The short answer is to use "Baseline (Optimized)" for saving JPG files.

The long answer(s) can be found by searching the Web for "baseline standard", but here's what you need to know about PSE's JPG saving options:

JPG is a "lossy" method of compressing image files -- it throws away image data before doing the compression, so set your "Quality" option to "Maximized". That is the key setting for image quality.

"Baseline (Optimized)" might reduce file size slightly (2% or so), and might be incompatible with viewers using old technology. "Optimized" might produce better colours, but that might not be perceptable.

"Progressive" means that the image is rendered as scan lines (like the old-fashioned TVs used) so that a browser will quickly show a reduced quality image of half the scan lines while it resolves the complete image.

Personally, I never use JPG -- each time a JPG is saved you lose more and more image data because of the lossy compression algorithms. I use PNG, which is lossless.

Ken

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Jun 04, 2012 4
New Here ,
Jun 04, 2012

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Thanks for the info, I've decided to use png myself after reading your posting. However, when saving the files it asks if I want to save interlaced or not... What does this mean?

Keith.

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Jun 04, 2012 1
LEGEND ,
Jun 04, 2012

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The same as that "Progressive" option for JPGs.  Use non-interlaced.

Ken

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Jun 04, 2012 1
New Here ,
Jun 16, 2016

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When saving jpegs in Photoshop as photos to print (and not to use on the web) what is the best format saving option here?

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Jun 16, 2016 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 16, 2016

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You should save the jpeg as a psd or tif.

Repeatedly saving a file as a jpeg reduces the image quality with each save because jpeg

uses compression to keep the file size small, but quality suffers because of the compression.

Jpeg is a destructive file format suited for the web or email.

Psd and tiff are non destructive, meaning the image quality doesn't deteriorate with each save.

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Jun 16, 2016 0
Community Beginner ,
Sep 29, 2016

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Thanks for this thread I've learnt few things today. I have a question though.

Should I check the "Embed Color Profiie: sRGB IEC61966-2.1" box or keep it uncheck while saving as PSD, JPG or PNG or any other format.

Please see the attached image for better understanding.

Thanks in advance! Screenshot at Sep 29 17-20-13.png

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Sep 29, 2016 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 29, 2016

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Check Embed Color Profile

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Sep 29, 2016 1
Community Beginner ,
Sep 29, 2016

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Thank you! Can you help me again about saving image as PNG. In the image below which option should I choose to get the best possible image for the web.

Screenshot at Sep 29 17-32-47.png

Thank you very much!

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Sep 29, 2016 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 29, 2016

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Rather than use File>Save As>PNG

Try File>Export>Export As or File>Export> Save for Web

With either of the above options, you have more choices to get the smallest png file size.

Using File>Save AS>PNG saves all the metadata, which can result in very large file sizes.

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Sep 29, 2016 2
Community Beginner ,
Sep 29, 2016

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Okay but the problem is when I try to save the way you said Photoshop doesn't let me save it as the original Photoshop file size because of the large width & length. Is there anyway it can be resolved?

I've attached a screenshot below where the file size was shrunk to about 91%. The file's original size is 1920x8932 px.

Image 2016-09-30 at 3.11.18 am.png

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Sep 29, 2016 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 29, 2016

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You don't an image that big for posting on the web, do you?

Save for web has a limit to the file size it accepts.

For web posting, most people reduce the image size to something less than 1500 pixels on the long side.

Also, using jpeg for posting on the web is better, since the file size is way smaller than a png.

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Sep 29, 2016 1
Community Beginner ,
Sep 29, 2016

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I actually do need to export big size images for clients to see how my templates are, which are usually 1920px wide. Those images shown in a websites, I'd like my images to be in best quality for viewing. In that case should I export as JPG or should I save it as PNG?

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Sep 29, 2016 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 30, 2016

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For both the png an jpeg try File>Export As

Then you can compare the file sizes and decide for yourself if one or the other is better, i.e., file size versus quality.

Png images of that size may take a longer than practical time to load on a web page, depending on how fast ones internet connection is.

Jpegs will be of lower quality, though maybe not so much as to notice, while pngs will be of the best quality, but much bigger file sizes.

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Sep 30, 2016 3
Community Beginner ,
Sep 30, 2016

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Okay. Thank you very much!

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Sep 30, 2016 0
Engaged ,
Oct 08, 2019

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Your better off using save for Web. The save as command and using JPEG is horribly bad, it hardly makes any difference, even when setting it to low. When using Saves for Web, files will be about 60% smaller. Not sure why this is, it seems like the Saves JPEG method doesnt work properly.

What i do find strange is that i read there thinking of dropping the Sve for Web command, its very old and slow. Hope they come with a good alternative, because saves as is just not good in my opinion.

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Oct 08, 2019 0