Recoloring clothing that has patterns in it....

Engaged ,
Jan 30, 2021 Jan 30, 2021

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In a Facebook group I'm in a user was wanting to change some clothing that has patterns in it, to just one solid color, or to replace the pattern with a different pattern.

I can make solid color clothing, like a white sweater, any color I want  with no difficulty, and maintain the clothing texture through the color change. 

I jsut can't figure out how to change clothing with patterns in it to a solid color, and maintain the texture of the clothing.

In the image below (which I got off of pexels) is it possible to change the jacket to a solid color, lets call it blue, and maintain the pattern / texutre of the jacket material?

I'm running PSE 2021 / WIN 10 and the user is running PSE2020 and WIN 10. jacket.png


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Creative, How to, Windows

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 31, 2021 Jan 31, 2021

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Glenn, it's not entirely clear what you have in mind.  It is fairly easy to change the color tone of the pattern.  Select the clothing with the pattern, copy the selection to a new layer, add a solid color fill layer, and create a clipping mask.  It will end up something like this:

Ashampoo_Snap_2021.01.30_18h03m18s_005_.png

But it is far more difficult to remove the underlying pattern and replace it with a new solid color material or different pattern unless you perhaps clone the material from another article of clothing.

 

One alternative I came up with was to add an Emboss filter over a grey fill layer, to emphasize the creases and wrinkles and downplaying the fabric pattern:

 

Ashampoo_Snap_2021.01.30_19h38m56s_007_.png

After adding a color fill layer, this was the result:

 

Ashampoo_Snap_2021.01.30_23h48m33s_008_.png

To remove some more of the pattern, I added a gaussian blur and ended up with this:

 

Ashampoo_Snap_2021.01.30_23h51m31s_009_.png

I am going to ping @Jeff Arola  to see if he has any better ideas. 

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Engaged ,
Jan 31, 2021 Jan 31, 2021

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I llke the emboss filter idea... It's like a bump map in my 3D modelling stuff in DAZ 3D.  This is definately not a "new user" skill!   

The user in the facebookbook group wants to remove a pattern on a stock dress image she was wanting to purchase.   I tolder. if it was me, I'd just look for a different free image, andgo back to watching cat videos on youtube.. 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 31, 2021 Jan 31, 2021

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In theory, the issue with the patterns is a 'frequency separation' matter after a selection problem.

We want to keep the low frequencies: the general tones (highlights and shadows around the sleeves for instance,

We want to keep the fabric texture (wool...)

We want to get rid of the middle frequencies, the drawing pattern (Prince of Wales?).

 

It's similar to the separation techniques used in portrait retouching, where we want to keep the shadows and highlights, keep the skin texture but we want to hide skin defects.

 

I'll have to test if the frequency separation script from Elements+ may help. However, it's a very hard task and I believe we'll be able to tone down the pattern, but removing it in a reallistic pattern will be a challenge.

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Engaged ,
Jan 31, 2021 Jan 31, 2021

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Definately an advanced user skill.   If I could learn how to do this, and master it, I'd charge people to do it. 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 31, 2021 Jan 31, 2021

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@Glenn 8675309 

Definately an advanced user skill. If I could learn how to do this, and master it, I'd charge people to do it.

 

You remember the gag by Clown Grock: He realizes that the piano and the stool are too far away to get to the keyboard. He thinks for a while, and goes to push the piano towards the stool.

In the precise instance, it should be obvious to non advanced users that starting with a garment without patterns makes changing color and even adding patterns much easier.
On the other hand, real 'pro' advertisements don't use any Photoshop trick. Either they show a single color and add a swatch for the available colors, or they take different pictures. Getting a realistic result for different colors even without patterns is already 'advanced' editing.

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Engaged ,
Jan 31, 2021 Jan 31, 2021

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One of the reasons I use 3D models.  I'll grab a 3d model and just change the clothing or the material layer, or the color of the clothing with a few mouse clicks, be done with it, and start on something else.     

I typically use about 5 minutes as my "cut off" time: If I can't get it done in 5 minutes or less in PSE (and I've been usign it a while) I won't bother with it. 

 lady2.pnglady1.png

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 31, 2021 Jan 31, 2021

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jacketPatten-3.jpgHere the result of applying the frequency separation script of Elements+ and masking the 'detail' layer. Masking also the textures layer would blur more, but would also hide the texture which still reamains visible in the black pull-over.

jacketPatten-2.jpg

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 31, 2021 Jan 31, 2021

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Try this:

1.Open the image

2 Select the jacket with the magnetic lasso tool (I selected a portion for demonstration)

3.Place the selection on its own layer (press CTRL+J)

4.Duplicate this layer

5.In the layer created in step #3, convert to black/white (press ALT+CTRL+B)

6.With the layer created in step #4 active, open a Hue/Saturation adjustment layer above it, and check the colorize box. Then, use the sliders to adjust the hue/saturation/brightness to suit.

7. Merge down the top 2 layers

8. Drag the b/w layer  to the top, and set then layer's blending mode to Luminosity.

 

hatstead_0-1612119472538.png

 

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Engaged ,
Jan 31, 2021 Jan 31, 2021

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I gave your method a try and it produces the same results that I can do all day long with no problem.  I did print up your response- I like putting things i ndocument protectors / 3 ring binders for safe keeping. 

2021-01-31_144904.jpg

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