Calibrated Laptop Monitor not showing the correct colors in Photoshop

Explorer ,
Nov 24, 2016 Nov 24, 2016

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Hi, I am a photographer and photo editor.  I recently purchased an Xrite i1Display pro to Calibrate my laptop screen.  I have an Acer V15 Nitro. 

Once calibrated and a new profile was created, everything on my laptop looked great.  However, once I opened up an image in Photoshop and Lightroom, I noticed the image appeared way more saturated, and had a pinkish tone to the image.  The same effect shows when I open it up in Windows photo, but when I use a program like Irfanview, the image looks correct as calibrated. 

I've done some search on this topic but a lot of the responses don't really answer my question, which is this:

Is there any way I can have Photoshop and Lightroom show the correctly calibrated colors on my laptop screen so I can edit them properly?

If not, then it seems like there's no way I will be able to use the calibrated profiles since the colors are too off in photoshop for me to edit them. 

Would a better option to buy a separate monitor that already comes pre-calibrated?

I'm basically just looking to get calibrated colors that can be viewed across all programs.

Thanks in advance.

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correct answers 1 Correct Answer

Explorer , Feb 21, 2021 Feb 21, 2021
Got a random notification about this thread that I pretty much forgot I started years ago.  In case anyone is wondering what happened since; I had that laptop sent in to be looked at by experts and it was determined that the display panel itself was the issue.  I don't recall whether it was because the display itself had a very narrow sRGB gamut but something was off with it.  Since then, I've gone through a couple of newer laptops and external monitors and have never had this issue again.  Curr...

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 02, 2016 Dec 02, 2016

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Oh yes, matrix-based. Sorry.

If the document profile here is Adobe RGB, that's precisely not what I was asking for. I specifically requested sRGB. So...how can we ever get to the bottom of this when all we get is a rapidly moving target...?

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Explorer ,
Dec 06, 2016 Dec 06, 2016

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D Fosse,

I've attached the two new screenshots you requested.  This screenshot image is embedded with the sRGB profile.

The screenshot below is using the default sRGB monitor profile:

srgb profile.jpg

The screenshot below is using the Xrite generated profile using the settings you mentioned (ICC2, Min patches: 118, Matrix, Native white point, and display type to white LED)

Xrite profile.jpg

As you can see, still a reddish cast on the image when using the Xrite generated profile and opened in Photoshop.  Does not look any better than my previous examples.  Any new thoughts on why this is happening and how to correct it?

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Guide ,
Dec 06, 2016 Dec 06, 2016

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It seems you’re still a little confused about display profiles and profiles assigned to documents. They should never be the same profile.

Try following these steps, carefully…

• Download this image: https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3939/15648465231_4e9feff533_o_d.jpg

• Set Photoshop’s Colour Management settings to ‘North America General Purpose 2’, then quit.

• In Windows Control Panel > Color Management > Device, set your Default Profile to sRGB.

• Launch Photoshop.

• Open the downloaded image.

• Take a screenshot, ensuring all of the image is visible (particularly the grey patches at the bottom).

• Quit Photoshop.

• In Windows Control Panel > Color Management > Device, set your Default Profile to the one generated by Xrite.

• Launch Photoshop.

• Open the downloaded image.

• Take a screenshot, ensuring all of the image is visible (particularly the grey patches at the bottom).

• Upload both screenshots, as they are, without assigning any profiles to the actual screenshot files or making any conversions.

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Explorer ,
Dec 06, 2016 Dec 06, 2016

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Danny,

The last screenshots I uploaded followed the exact same steps you mentioned.

I viewed the image you linked and it looks exactly the same as my previous screenshots in my last post, under both conditions.

I don't understand why every keeps assuming that I am the one that's confused when I have now uploaded 7 examples of the reddish tone clearly prevalent in my images. 

It looks like I'm just going to have to see someone to help me with this in person because everyone thinks that it's just a user error on my part and in fact it isn't.  Like I said, I have confirmed this with an iMac, Macbook Pro, and an NEC monitor.  My monitor is the only one that exhibits this reddish skin tone. 

I have also borrowed a friend's Colormunki and it still shows the same problem with my monitor.

At this point, it looks like the issue is either with Xrite or with my Monitor. 

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Guide ,
Dec 05, 2016 Dec 05, 2016

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murdoc16 wrote:

What is the cause for the excessive reddish tone for when I open up the images in photoshop

It's either

a) Assigning the wrong profile to your images, or

b) There actually is a red cast, but software without colour management is deceiving you into thinking there isn't, and you're reluctant to let go of the misconception that they represent 'true colour', or

b) Bad monitor profile.

And it could be a mix of all three.

murdoc16 wrote:

is there anything I can do about it?

Yes, remove it with Photoshop's colour correction tools, on a calibrated monitor, with the appropriate profile assigned.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 29, 2016 Nov 29, 2016

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Whew, these test images always make me dizzy...couldn't they make them a little simpler...?

If the top half really was not color managed at all, then they would all look the same regardless of what monitor profile - it would't be used anyway. And yet they're different. And I've no idea what you mean by "viewed on web" in that context.

We really need to eliminate all the irrelevant variables here.

  • Keep the document profile sRGB.
  • Set sRGB as display profile too, restart Photoshop, make a screenshot.
  • Change the display profile to the i1 profile, restart Photoshop, make another screenshot.

In the first case, the document and display profiles are the same, no change in that conversion. The original values are passed straight to the display - so that simulates no color management reliably. In the second case, you have a standard color managed display chain. This will establish how the display differs from sRGB. I'm not interested in accuracy here, just the difference.

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New Here ,
Jan 24, 2018 Jan 24, 2018

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Do you shoot in Raw?

What are your in camera settings?

If you're a Raw shooter, its best to set your color in camera as Adobe RGB

Then also in your LR & PS be sure all of the settings possible are all set to Adobe RGB

And when saving, also as Adobe RGB

Or make everything sRGB, which is even more reliable across devices

That's the most important thing to do for compatibility across devices and platforms

Otherwise Adobe applications will interpret the raw data differently from your OS & 3rd party image viewers

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 24, 2018 Jan 24, 2018

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This whole thread (over a year old btw) was about the display profile, not the document profile. That's what the OP never understood, and that's why the thread kept going for so long. It could have been resolved in about three or four posts.

The camera setting for color space is moot and irrelevant for raw files. It only applies to camera-processed jpegs. Raw files are encoded into a color space in the raw converter.

And there is no particular need for consistency in color settings across color managed applications. An embedded document profile will usually follow the file all the way, and override any application defaults.

Even if it doesn't, the whole point of color management is to remap from one color space to the next, so that appearance is preserved, and any file in any color space will be correctly represented on screen or any other destination. The important thing is to make sure the color management chain is not broken or interrupted.

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New Here ,
Feb 20, 2021 Feb 20, 2021

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I have the same problem.

can anyone give a quick reply?

i can tell in advance that its not raw, its not browser issue or photos not having embeded profile or monitor not capable of showing true colors etc.

 

i follow the same workflow for sometime so i can see there is somehing wrong. 

the biggest clue is ; i can see the exact same colors in photoshop with windows preview (or whatever the name) when i go to photoshop/ proof colors / monitor rgb. But i have to hit "proof colors" everytime i open a new photo in ps. I believe that "monitor rgb" is refering to calibration file which is created by xrite idisplay pro after calibrating my monitor. 

i feel like i need to tell photoshop to use that calibration file as default maybe?

 

so anyway to fix this issue?

 

thanx in advance.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 21, 2021 Feb 21, 2021

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ozan5E19

There are so many possible variables here

How many displays connected?

Soes the image you are viewing have an embedded ICC profile? 

 

Is your main display (the one you use for Photoshop calibrated and profiled)?

I suggest you download and open this test image in Photoshop https://www.colourmanagement.net/downloads/CMnet_Pixl_AdobeRGB_testimage05.zip

How does it look in Photoshop? DO skintones look natural? 

 

ONLY colour managed applications will give you correct colour.

Windows PHOTOS program is NOT colour managed, don't ever use it for accurate viewing.

 

Setting Photoshop proof colours = display profile] basically switches off all colour management,

that’s why Photoshop matches Windows PHOTOS when you set Photoshop proof colours = display profile.

 

Color managed applications are the only way to view colour accurately.  

However, they can only do that with a GOOD monitor display profile

 

Could it be this issue, its very common - please read on:

Windows display profile, display profile issues on Windows

At least once a week on this forum we read about this, or very similar issues of appearance differing between colour managed applications.

Of course you must not expect accurate colour with programs such as Windows "Photos", because colour management is not implemented there so such programs are incapable of providing accurate image display.

 

Unfortunately, with Microsoft hardware: Windows updates, Graphics Card updates and Display manufacturers have a frustratingly growing reputation for installing useless (corrupted) monitor display profiles.

I CAN happen with Macs but with far less likelihood, it seems.

 

The issue can affect different applications in different ways, some not at all, some very badly.

 

The poor monitor display profile issue is hidden by some applications, specifically those that do not use colour management, such as Microsoft Windows "Photos".

 

Photoshop is correct, it’s the industry standard for viewing images, in my experience it's revealing an issue with the Monitor Display profile rather that causing it. Whatever you do, don't ignore it. As the issue isn’t caused by Photoshop, don’t change your Photoshop ‘color settings’ to try fix it. 

 

To find out if the monitor display profile is the issue, I recommend you to try setting the monitor profile for your own monitor display under “Device” in your Windows ‘color management’ control panel to sRGB temporarily. 

You can ADD sRGB if its not already listed. 

And be sure to check “Use my settings for this device”.

 

(OR, if you have a wide gamut monitor display (check the spec online) it’s better to try Adobe RGB here instead).

Quit and relaunch Photoshop after the control panel change, to ensure the new settings are applied.

 

Color Management.jpg

 

Screenshot of Color Management Control Panel 

 

Depending on the characteristics of your monitor display and your requirements, using sRGB or Adobe RGB here may be good enough - but custom calibration is a superior approach.

 

If this change fixes the issue, it is recommended that you should now calibrate and profile the monitor properly using a calibration sensor like i1display pro, which will create and install it's own custom monitor profile. The software should install it’s profile correctly so there should be no need to manually set the control panel once you are doing this right. 

 

 

 

Still got problems?

If you want to try a method that’s proved successful to rule out many an issue we see with Photoshop, you can reset preferences:

 

To reset the preferences in Photoshop: 

https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/using/preferences.html

 

Note: Make sure that you back up all your custom presets, brushes & actions before restoring Photoshop's preferences. Migrate presets, actions, and settings

 

 

I hope this helps

neil barstow, colourmanagement net :: adobe forum volunteer

google me "neil barstow colourmanagement" for lots of free articles on colour management

[please only use the blue reply button at the top of the page, this maintains the original thread title and chronological order of posts]

 

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Explorer ,
Feb 21, 2021 Feb 21, 2021

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Got a random notification about this thread that I pretty much forgot I started years ago. 

 

In case anyone is wondering what happened since; I had that laptop sent in to be looked at by experts and it was determined that the display panel itself was the issue.  I don't recall whether it was because the display itself had a very narrow sRGB gamut but something was off with it.  Since then, I've gone through a couple of newer laptops and external monitors and have never had this issue again.  Currently have a well-calibrated Gigabyte Aero 15x laptop with an Asus ProArt PA278QV External Monitor.  I also switched over to using DisplayCAL instead of the software included with the i1 Display Pro, and I would recommend others to do the same. 

 

In the end, sometimes the simplest answer is the correct one, and for me, my previous laptop display just wasn't good enough.  Hope this helps anyone. 

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