Color changes when saving from PSD to JPEG

New Here ,
Aug 27, 2016 Aug 27, 2016

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Hi all,

When i export the image bellow from psd to jpeg the color changes.

The pink becomes purple!

2016-08-27_22-47-24.jpg

Any help would be appreciated

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correct answers 1 Correct Answer

Adobe Community Professional , Aug 28, 2016 Aug 28, 2016
Just to be absolutely clear on this - the problem here is that the file is in ProPhoto RGB.Windows "Photos" is not color managed and cannot represent a ProPhoto file correctly. Nor will any other application without color management.Convert to sRGB. That is the correct answer to your question (which is a very common beginner's mistake, BTW).In Photoshop, go to Edit > Convert to Profile > sRGB IEC61966-2.1.If you are Using "Export As" or "Save For Web", just check the Convert to sRGB box.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 27, 2016 Aug 27, 2016

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You need to know more about bit depth, Color space and Color management

your psd is 16-bit .. so when exporting to jpg , the image previewer could not preview the 16-bit  correctly

Switch to 8-bit and make sure your color space is the same as the

image -> mode -> 8 bit

more about color management:

Set up color management

16bit.png

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 27, 2016 Aug 27, 2016

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Convert to sRGB.

Your original is ProPhoto, which only displays correctly in a fully color managed environment.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 28, 2016 Aug 28, 2016

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Just to be absolutely clear on this - the problem here is that the file is in ProPhoto RGB.

Windows "Photos" is not color managed and cannot represent a ProPhoto file correctly. Nor will any other application without color management.

Convert to sRGB. That is the correct answer to your question (which is a very common beginner's mistake, BTW).

In Photoshop, go to Edit > Convert to Profile > sRGB IEC61966-2.1.

If you are Using "Export As" or "Save For Web", just check the Convert to sRGB box.

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New Here ,
Aug 28, 2016 Aug 28, 2016

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Yes, i did that and worked.

Thank you very much.

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New Here ,
Sep 14, 2020 Sep 14, 2020

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Hi, I had converted profile to sRGB and 8 bits/channel. Still when I take the pictures on my phone, the color changes. But on the other hand when I take a screenshot via snipping tool, and take that image on my phone the image is what I can see on screen. So definitely I'm going wrong somewhere while exporting but don't know where. Any other suggestions?

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New Here ,
Mar 07, 2021 Mar 07, 2021

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Hopefuly helpful to others. This worked for me too.

 

But the second way below to solve did not,

"If you are Using "Export As" or "Save For Web", just check the Convert to sRGB box."

 

Though ti's 2021 and I'm still using Photoshop CS5.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 07, 2021 Mar 07, 2021

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You must Convert to sRGB and Embed Color Profile.

For accurate colour put Windows Photos away and use color managed software and browsers

 

Dave

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Community Beginner ,
Apr 06, 2021 Apr 06, 2021

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hi guys i want to ask for help, in my case is the other way i edit the photo in adobe rgb then i follow the steps i convert to srgb then export also change to 8 bit  and when i open the picture is over saturated, i dont know what happens, yesterday i purchased a beutiful 4k monitor for editing because i wanted to represent the color correctly but its terrible now, its dcip3 and 90% color gamut, but can you please help me recommend what to do, i follow the steps here and the steps in videos but all the videos in photoshop looks great and when they export it looks bad so it doesnt apply to me. Thanks in advance. Capture.JPG

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 07, 2021 Apr 07, 2021

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There is a very simple answer to your question, and it can be summed up like this:

 

If you don't fully understand the implications of buying a wide gamut monitor, don't buy one. Wide gamut monitors can only be used with fully color managed software.

 

Yes, DCI-P3 is wide gamut. And no, Windows "Photos" is not color managed. Stop using it, it will not display correctly, ever.

 

There is no problem using wide gamut monitors if you understand what they do. I have been using wide gamut monitors exclusively for many, many years and it's perfectly fine and usable for any purpose. You just cannot use software that doesn't support color management. Or if you absolutely have to, ignore the oversaturation.

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Community Beginner ,
Apr 07, 2021 Apr 07, 2021

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i think is too late for the understanding because i already purchase it.  I will stop using the photos app in windows, thank you for the advise

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New Here ,
Oct 27, 2019 Oct 27, 2019

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Not sure if this is scientifically correct, but when I print photos from my Samsung 8 into online albums or home printer, they print dull. When I print photos from my Nikon 5200 or other Nikon cameras the color comes out true to what I see on my screen. Printing online with different companies is tricky...but I never resolved that issue with print media. So now, when taking photos I want to print, I use my bulky, less convenient Nikons. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think there is a tech difference between what we see on our phone/computer screens and what we print on papers. Printing is complex and frustrating but I've been doing it for decades. There is backlight on screens. There is no backlight on paper...so the colors are muddy. You could try a different profile in Photoshop for messing with photos for print. That doesn't change the light in print photos for me. I have never printed directly from my phone to my printer to see if that prints true, but then I can't use photoshop and dicker with it. My problem might be that way back when my techy refused to set me up with Apple due to cost and other issues like it crashed all the time, and I got used to PC and it's cost effective for me. He came free. Maybe if you have a home printer you could experiment using different profiles in Photoshop with camera pics and phone pics. One album I did, I had a mix  of photos from phone and Nikon...from a trip and I noticed a consistent muddiness from my phone pics compared to the sharp true color from the Nikon. I like to travel with phone for pics...my Nikon is a pain re charging batteries overseas and carrying the heavy stuff...but next time I'm taking phone for phone and Nikon for photos!!! Good luck with printing. It's complex.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 27, 2019 Oct 27, 2019

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Printing is not complex and a good match from screen to print is achievable (within the obvious limitations of inks). But it requires :

a. A calibrated and profiled screen (a phone screen is not calibrated or profiled)

b. Software which uses colour management (guess what - neither iOS or Android support colour management). Photoshop is colour managed

c. Documents having an embedded profile that matches their content (this can be sRGB, Adobe RGB, Pro Photo etc)

d. A printer profile which describes your printer + ink + paper combination.

 

You do not experiment with colour profiles , you use the right one for the device or document it describes.

 

With those four in place, printing is simple

 

Dave

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New Here ,
Jan 19, 2020 Jan 19, 2020

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I am experiencing the same problem. When I copy and paste or "place" my photoshop images into the InDesign document, which is a booklet I will have printed, these images are much lighter, less saturated and even appear pixellated.  The solution, as I understand it, lies in color management and that I should convert to the "sRGB 1966"...that is mentioned in this thread and other ones as well. BUT I believe the print company wants the images in CMYK. Or is this outdated info? thank you very much!

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 19, 2020 Jan 19, 2020

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Save out as RGB from Photoshop, and make sure the color profile is embedded when you save the file. For the purposes of this discussion it doesn't matter which profile, as long as it's there.

 

Make sure the InDesign color settings preserve embedded RGB profiles. By default it will, so don't change any settings here unless you know what you're doing. The images will now match Photoshop.

 

If the printer wants CMYK, they want what is known as a press-ready PDF. You export this PDF from InDesign, and this is where everything is converted to final destination CMYK. Here's the important thing: you must always ask the printer which CMYK they want, which specific CMYK profile you should use. There is no worldwide standard here and the Photoshop/InDesign default is probably wrong! The default, US Web Coated (SWOP), is not used anywhere outside the Americas, and isn't always inside either. 

 

InDesign can handle both RGB and CMYK content in the same document. Images should always be placed as RGB, while graphic elements are usually best created in final destination CMYK.

 

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New Here ,
Jan 21, 2020 Jan 21, 2020

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Thank you...we are learning...slowly! One thing we discovered is that the photoshopped images we were having trouble with had not yet been "linked" into our InDesign document. When we did that, that got rid of the pixelation. We are also seeing a difference in image appearance between our main computer and the new laptop. (Same document is on both) On the laptop, (HP Windows 10) the Photoshop images appear to much better match the exported InDesign images in color hue and saturation. However there's still a discrepancy between the two on our Lenovo Windows 10 desktop computer. We will follow your instructions per above.  Thank you,

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 22, 2020 Jan 22, 2020

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Hi Mary

you wrote: We are also seeing a difference in image appearance between our main computer and the new laptop. (Same document is on both) On the laptop, (HP Windows 10)

 

Display screens need calibration and profiling, For this you need a measurememnt device and good software. 

Adobe applications will then use the screens ICC profile to send adapted data to the monitor screen to produce correct appearance.

you may notice, though, that tilting a laptop screen or m=ving your head uop and down can give significant changes to on-screen appearance, so - how can we know - which positiion is right?

That "feature" of many laptopo screens can mean that for serious image judgement use you may have a hard time using the laptop screen. In whiuch case you need to plug in a decent second screen like an Eizo Coloredge - some of those are even self calibrating and make their own ICC profile.

 

have a read up here about what icc profiles do:

https://www.colourmanagement.net/advice/about-icc-colour-profiles/

 

I hope this helps

if so, please "like" my reply

thanks

neil barstow, colourmanagement.net

[please do not use the reply button on a message in the thread, only use the one at the top of the page, to maintain chronological order]

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Community Beginner ,
Oct 05, 2020 Oct 05, 2020

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I have the same issue but the answer is not working.Untitled-1.jpgUntitled-5.jpg

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 05, 2020 Oct 05, 2020

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@sus4mee  No that is not the same issue.

It looks like your "issue" is that you are seeing a change in your image when flattening. The answer is to view before and after flattening at 100% zoom.
The preview when zoomed out is not accurate. In most images it is close enough that it goes unnoticed but on some, with fine noise or certain combinations of blending, it is very noticeable indeed.

So adjust your image at 100% zoom and the flattened version will look the same.

 

Dave

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Community Beginner ,
Oct 05, 2020 Oct 05, 2020

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@davescm 

Thank you for your kind reply. But it is sure that it is not about Zoom, I think. Coz I checked in a different view, even in 200% to make sure. 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 05, 2020 Oct 05, 2020

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Please show two screenshots, before and after flattening - both at 100% zoom

Dave

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Community Beginner ,
Oct 05, 2020 Oct 05, 2020

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Thank you so much Dave for still being with me.

In 100% View, it's remaining the same... But in output like JEG, the color shed getting darker.

 

Regards

Tanmay

s3.jpgs4.jpgs1.jpgs2.jpg

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 05, 2020 Oct 05, 2020

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Hi

Please keep all screenshots to 100% zoom.

At 100% each image pixel is mapped to a screen pixel. At lower zoom levels, several image pixels are combined to form a screen pixel. Your screenshots show 25% in which 16 image pixels are combined to form a single screen pixel for preview. In the case of the multi layer image then that is done before blending the layers. In the case of the flattened image, that combination is done after blending. So the results display differently.

 

If I am missing your point , then please use screenshots to demonstrate but please keep them all at 100% zoom.

 

Dave

 

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Community Beginner ,
Oct 06, 2020 Oct 06, 2020

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Okey! now I got you.

I have never thought like this before. Thanks for the information dave. I am really happy to learn the sequence.

 

Regards

Tanmay

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 06, 2020 Oct 06, 2020

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Hi Tanmay, lets see those 100% screenshots Dave asked for please.

I am sure many (including me) will be intrigued to see the issue in action and to know the solution.

 

I hope this helps

thanks
neil barstow, colourmanagement.net :: adobe forum volunteer
[please do not use the reply button on a message within the thread, only use the blue reply button at the top of the page, this maintains the original thread title and chronological order of posts]

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