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Color corrections for paper/printer settings?

Community Beginner ,
Nov 15, 2020

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So, I have a digital sketch I made in photoshop on my iPad. It opens and looks as expected on my desktop, except the colors don't print correctly to my Epson 7800 on my paper of choice.  When I use "proof setup," the color changes are evident, so the print comes out as expected- just not what I created.  

 

What I'm not sure of- is how to adapt the image so I get the colors I want on the paper of choice/icc of choice. Is the process solely manual? Look at the image on my ipad, while trying to modify the colors on my desktop, or is there a more automated way?  Since "color" is just a mathematical adjustment, right?

 

 

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by davescm | Adobe Community Professional

"I thought gamut was about blacks or highlights- values that were off the chart at one end or the other. I didn't think it would impact a fairly normal pink or green. "

 

The tonal range from black to white is one issue, but also the colour ranges of prints and screens are different.  A  red emmiting from a screen in  RGB, for example, may not be printable on a system that uses combinations of Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black to produce colours on white paper. The manufacturers of inkjet printers try and extend the gamut by adding additional coloured inks (e.g. my p5000 adds Green and Orange inks, the Canon Pro1000 adds Red and Blue) but the gamut of an emmiting device and a printing device are going to be different.

 

I can't comment directly on the iPad as I do not use one with Photoshop.

Dave

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Color corrections for paper/printer settings?

Community Beginner ,
Nov 15, 2020

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So, I have a digital sketch I made in photoshop on my iPad. It opens and looks as expected on my desktop, except the colors don't print correctly to my Epson 7800 on my paper of choice.  When I use "proof setup," the color changes are evident, so the print comes out as expected- just not what I created.  

 

What I'm not sure of- is how to adapt the image so I get the colors I want on the paper of choice/icc of choice. Is the process solely manual? Look at the image on my ipad, while trying to modify the colors on my desktop, or is there a more automated way?  Since "color" is just a mathematical adjustment, right?

 

 

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by davescm | Adobe Community Professional

"I thought gamut was about blacks or highlights- values that were off the chart at one end or the other. I didn't think it would impact a fairly normal pink or green. "

 

The tonal range from black to white is one issue, but also the colour ranges of prints and screens are different.  A  red emmiting from a screen in  RGB, for example, may not be printable on a system that uses combinations of Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black to produce colours on white paper. The manufacturers of inkjet printers try and extend the gamut by adding additional coloured inks (e.g. my p5000 adds Green and Orange inks, the Canon Pro1000 adds Red and Blue) but the gamut of an emmiting device and a printing device are going to be different.

 

I can't comment directly on the iPad as I do not use one with Photoshop.

Dave

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Nov 15, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 15, 2020

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Hi

Welcome to the world of digital colour and colour management.

 

You are right in that pixel values are just numbers and only represent a colour in the context of a colour space. When that colour is displayed on a screen or printed on paper the numbers get translated (in the background) so that the colour displayed or printed is correct. That is the job of the colour management system and the display /printer profiles. However some colours can be within the gamut of the document and display but outside of the range of printable colours from your printer. These are known as "out of gamut" colours and have to be changed (otherwise they would just be left out). How they are changed is set by the rendering intent (perceptual rendering intent or relative colormetric rendering intent) . The fact that you see the change when proofing colours and also the print matches your proof suggests that is the issue here.  If you view gamut warning it may help confirm this (although the gamut warning is not 100% accurate). If it is due to out of gamut colours then you have no choice but to accept the change on printing , or to use colours within the gamut of your intended output device/ink and paper.

Dave

 

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Most Valuable Participant ,
Nov 15, 2020

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@davescm has pretty much said it. You will always have those limitations, as most mobile devices don't even care for color management and to boot it's way to easy to mistweak them or enable features like adaptive brightness that further affect color rendering. Outside that you would have to get into real CM, which entails a lot of reading and headache simply because you have to go all the way and can't just do "a little bit of CM". To your specific case it might help if you started out by creating a bunch of reference images such as the typical color swatches and gradient bars to even get an idea how it looks on different devices, i.e. you create an image under "perfect" conditions (including correct printing) on your stationary computer and then upload it to the tablet and vice versa you create such an image on your tablet and see how it looks on the big machine. Once you have a feeler for what needs to be optimized, a few basic adjustments like e.g. chnaging the system's Gamma setting or optimizing the monitor color can greatly improve matters even without getting into serious CM. I would also suggest you actually photograph your printed images or even the computer screen (under good lighting conditions) with your mobile device to get a further idea how it handles default colors. Even something "stupid" like taking a close-up photo of a blank sheet can be helpful to at least compare.

 

Mylenium

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Community Beginner ,
Nov 15, 2020

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Thanks for all of this. I have calibrated my monitor and printer using Color Munki, and when I proof, using the saved icc form that calibration session, I get really well matching prints to what I see on the monitor.  The ISSUE comes I guess now that I'm typing this, in that Photosho on the iPad doesn't have access to that icc, thus it does whatever it is doing. So, then, whn the image is opened on the desktop and proofed with the icc, I see what won't print as designed.

 

I'm not at the studio where I can open the image in Photoshop, while proofing with the icc and also look at the gamut warning to see what that shows. Though, thanks for those comments, I thought gamut was about blacks or highlights- values that were off the chart at one end or the other.  I didn't think it would impact a fairly normal pink or green.  

 

I guess what I was hoping for (past a simple solution, and  get why there isn't one) would be to hear more about how Photoshop on the iPad  handles color space compared to Photoshop on a desktop.  Or if there are steps to take when opening a file created in Photoshop on the iPad, on the desktop, to minimize these challenges.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 16, 2020

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"I thought gamut was about blacks or highlights- values that were off the chart at one end or the other. I didn't think it would impact a fairly normal pink or green. "

 

The tonal range from black to white is one issue, but also the colour ranges of prints and screens are different.  A  red emmiting from a screen in  RGB, for example, may not be printable on a system that uses combinations of Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black to produce colours on white paper. The manufacturers of inkjet printers try and extend the gamut by adding additional coloured inks (e.g. my p5000 adds Green and Orange inks, the Canon Pro1000 adds Red and Blue) but the gamut of an emmiting device and a printing device are going to be different.

 

I can't comment directly on the iPad as I do not use one with Photoshop.

Dave

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