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colour differences

New Here ,
Sep 25, 2020

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when i import an image to photoshop the colours are changing automatically the image is getting desaturated. could anyone please help me to solve the problem.1.jpg

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colour differences

New Here ,
Sep 25, 2020

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when i import an image to photoshop the colours are changing automatically the image is getting desaturated. could anyone please help me to solve the problem.1.jpg

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Sep 25, 2020 0
LEGEND ,
Sep 25, 2020

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»when i import an image to photoshop the colours are changing automatically the image is getting desaturated.«

The image appears to be sRGB so it seems like the problem is not Photoshop’s dispaly but that you compare it to the useless display of some application that does not employ Color Management. 

Which application is that? 

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Sep 25, 2020 0
New Here ,
Sep 25, 2020

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its windows photo viewer

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Sep 25, 2020 0
LEGEND ,
Sep 25, 2020

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Is is apparently not color managed 

https://forum.luminous-landscape.com/index.php?topic=117152.20

so it just passes the colors along to the monitor without compensating for the embedded ICC Profile and the Monitor Profile. 

Which means it is essentially worthless for evaluating an image’s colors. 

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Sep 25, 2020 0
New Here ,
Sep 25, 2020

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when i import raw image it is getting more desaturatedraw.jpg

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Sep 25, 2020 0
New Here ,
Sep 25, 2020

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this is the original imageorig.jpg

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Sep 25, 2020 0
LEGEND ,
Sep 25, 2020

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What WIndows Photos Viewer shows you is not the »original image«, it is a worthless direct display on the monitor without regard for the embedded ICC Profile. 

 

In the ACR dialog you apparently chose Adobe RGB, which is a larger Color Space than the sRGB of the jpg, so some difference is not unexpected. 

 

What are you doing whit the jpg anyway if you have the RAW image? 

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Sep 25, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 25, 2020

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The raw image is showing with all adjustments at their defaults. It is not supposed to match a preview, either from the camera which will have had some adjustments applied by the camera software. The idea of Raw shooting is that you can now adjust those sliders to get the most out of your Raw image and convert it to an RGB image. You should be able to match , or actually better, the camera default by using the sliders in Lightroom or ACR.

Dave

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Sep 25, 2020 1
New Here ,
Sep 25, 2020

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yeahhh but when i adjust the sliders to the colours i want and export the image it is showing more colours not getting the output that i want.

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Sep 25, 2020 0
New Here ,
Sep 25, 2020

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when i check the same image in another pc it is showing accurately 

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Sep 25, 2020 0
davescm LATEST
Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 25, 2020

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OK a step back.

Some software , such as Photoshop, is colour managed. It will display colours correctly provided that the profile in your system that describes your monitor is accurate and correct. Some software is not colour managed and will display incorrectly. So comparing the two is fruitless, as is accepting a non colour managed application as "accurate".

 

Colour Management simple explanation

Digital images are made up of numbers. In RGB mode, each pixel has a number representing Red, a number representing Green and a Number representing Blue. The problem comes in that different devices can be sent those same numbers but will show different colours. To see a demonstration of this, walk into your local T.V. shop and look at the different coloured pictures – all from the same material.

To ensure the output device is showing the correct colours then a colour management system needs to know two things.

1. What colours do the numbers in the document represent? 
This is the job of the document profile which describes the exact colour to be shown when Red=255 and what colour of white is meant when Red=255, Green = 255 and Blue =255. It also describes how the intermediate values move from 0 through to 255 – known as the tone response curve (or sometimes “gamma”).
Examples of colour spaces are (Adobe RGB1998, sRGB IEC61966-2.1)
With the information from the document profile, the colour management system knows what colour is actually represented by the pixel values in the document.

  1. What colour will be displayed on the printer/monitor if it is sent certain pixel values?
    This is the job of the monitor/printer & paper profile. It should describe exactly what colours the device is capable of showing and, how the device will respond when sent certain values.
    So with a monitor profile that is built to represent the specific monitor (or a printer profile built to represent the specific printer, ink and paper combination) then the colour management system can predict exactly what colours will be shown if it sends specific pixel values to that device.

    So armed with those two profiles, the colour management system will convert the numbers in the document to the numbers that must be sent to the device in order that the correct colours are displayed.

So what can go wrong :

  1. The colours look different in Photoshop, which is colour managed, to the colours in a different application which is not colour managed.
    This is not actually fault, but it is a commonly raised issue. It is the colour managed version which is correct – the none colour managed application is just sending the document RGB numbers to the output device regardless without any conversion regardless of what they represent in the document and the way they will be displayed on the output device.

  2. The colour settings are changed in Photoshop without understanding what they are for.
    This results in the wrong profiles being used and therefore the wrong conversions and the wrong colours.
    If Photoshop is set to Preserve embedded profiles – it will use the colour profile within the document.

  3. The profile for the output device is incorrect.
    The profile should represent the behaviour of the device exactly. If the wrong profile is used it will not. Equally if the settings on the device are changed in comparison to those settings when the profile was made, then the profile can no longer describe the behaviour of the device. Two examples would be using a printer profile designed for one paper, with a different paper. A second example would be using a monitor profile but changing the colour/contrast etc settings on the monitor.
    The monitor profile is set in the operating system (in Windows 10 that is under Settings>System>Display >Advanced) which leads to a potential further issue. Operating system updates can sometimes load a different monitor profile, or a broken profile, which no longer represents the actual monitor.

 

 

Colour management is simple to use provided the document profile is correct, always save or export with an embedded profile, and the monitor/printer profile is correct. All the math is done in the background.

 

I hope that helps

 

Dave

 

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Sep 25, 2020 1