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CutContour with Photoshop

New Here ,
Nov 12, 2020

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Hello,

I'd like to export a .pdf file with a vector path for cutting named "CutContour".

Is it possible to do this without using Illustrator?

Thank you for your help.

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by Stephen_A_Marsh | Adobe Community Professional

 

One can apply the path as a vector clipping mask to a solid-fill layer created specifically for this purpose (perhaps with a fill of  0%) and then save as a layered PDF.

 

Opening the Photoshop PDF in Illustrator and looking at the expanded layers panel, you will be able to isolate the path and release the clipping mask, as well as removing any other "fluff" so that you are only left with the image and the vector path. You can then stroke the vector path in your "CutContour" spot colour.

 

There will be pros/cons with whatever method you decide to use. I have not looked into what would provide the smoothest or automated workflow. As I mentioned earlier, I'm assuming that if you have to do a lot of this you'll need to find some form of automation, either in Photoshop+Illustrator or perhaps in Acrobat Pro (with or without add-on software).

 

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CutContour with Photoshop

New Here ,
Nov 12, 2020

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Hello,

I'd like to export a .pdf file with a vector path for cutting named "CutContour".

Is it possible to do this without using Illustrator?

Thank you for your help.

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by Stephen_A_Marsh | Adobe Community Professional

 

One can apply the path as a vector clipping mask to a solid-fill layer created specifically for this purpose (perhaps with a fill of  0%) and then save as a layered PDF.

 

Opening the Photoshop PDF in Illustrator and looking at the expanded layers panel, you will be able to isolate the path and release the clipping mask, as well as removing any other "fluff" so that you are only left with the image and the vector path. You can then stroke the vector path in your "CutContour" spot colour.

 

There will be pros/cons with whatever method you decide to use. I have not looked into what would provide the smoothest or automated workflow. As I mentioned earlier, I'm assuming that if you have to do a lot of this you'll need to find some form of automation, either in Photoshop+Illustrator or perhaps in Acrobat Pro (with or without add-on software).

 

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Nov 12, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 13, 2020

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If you are trying to do what I think you are, then no.

 

It is not the path name, it is that the vector path is stroked in a spot colour named 'CutContour".

 

Spot colours in Photoshop are raster channels.

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Nov 13, 2020 0
New Here ,
Nov 14, 2020

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I then understand that Photoshop cannot give a named color to a vector path, and that I could not directly create a .pdf for production.


Is it possible, at least, to export for illustrator a vector path and the pixel image at the same time?

 

Currently, I have to rework the client's file in 3 steps: export the vectorial drawing in .ai then the image and finally assemble the two in the illustrator.

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Nov 14, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 15, 2020

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Yes, this can be recorded into an action, however, a script would probably be better.

 

Questions:

 

* Just to be clear, does the file open in Photoshop always have a path that you wish to export with the file?

 

* Is there only one path, or are there multiple paths?

 

* Is there really any need to save the file open in Photoshop? Is it just resaving in the current format again? If a different file format is required, what file format and options?

 

* Similar to Photoshop automation, you will either need an action (actions can be rather limited in Illustrator compared to Photoshop) or even better a script in Illustrator to automate combining the vector path and raster image data.

 

 

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Nov 15, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 15, 2020

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Here is an example of a script to export the paths to .ai format:

 

// Export All Vector Paths to AI Format.jsx

#target photoshop

/* Start Open/Saved Document Error Check - Part A: Try */

savedDoc();

function savedDoc() {
    try {
        app.activeDocument.path;
        /* Finish Open/Saved Document Error Check - Part A: Try */

        /* Main Code Start */

        var docName = app.activeDocument.name.replace(/\.[^\.]+$/, '');
        var savePath = app.activeDocument.path;

        allPathsExport(new File(savePath + '/' + docName + '.ai'));

        function allPathsExport(In) {
            var c2t = function (s) { return app.charIDToTypeID(s); };
            var s2t = function (s) { return app.stringIDToTypeID(s); };
            var descriptor = new ActionDescriptor();
            var descriptor2 = new ActionDescriptor();
            descriptor2.putPath(c2t("In  "), In);
            descriptor2.putEnumerated(c2t("PthS"), c2t("PtSl"), c2t("AllP"));
            descriptor.putObject(s2t("using"), s2t("Illustrator Export.  This string makes me unique!"), descriptor2);
            executeAction(s2t("export"), descriptor, DialogModes.NO);
        }

        alert('An .ai file named: "' + docName + '.ai"' + ' has been exported to: "' + savePath + '"');

        /* Main Code Finish */
    }

    /* Start Open/Saved Document Error Check - Part B: Catch */
    catch (err) {
        alert("An image must be open and saved before running this script!");
    }
}
/* Finish Open/Saved Document Error Check - Part B: Catch */

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Nov 15, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 15, 2020

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Last-minute thought:

 

As an alternative to exporting the path from Photoshop and then combining with the raster file, it is possible to save as a Photoshop PDF and retain the vector file, then open up the PDF* in Illustrator to access the path.

 

*Using Illustrator as a PDF editor is generally frowned upon, however, it may streamline this specific workflow without the commonly cited issues.

 

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Nov 15, 2020 0
New Here ,
Nov 15, 2020

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Thank you for your help Stephen,

 

I did try to save a .pdf photoshop first, but when I open it in Illustrator, the vector path is lost.

When exporting to .pdf, Photoshop suggests me to keep "Annotations", "Alpha Layers", 'Direct Tone", "Layers" but not "Vector Tracks".

 

Can you tell me how it is possible to make a Photoshop .pdf that contains the vector file?

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Nov 15, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 15, 2020

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One can apply the path as a vector clipping mask to a solid-fill layer created specifically for this purpose (perhaps with a fill of  0%) and then save as a layered PDF.

 

Opening the Photoshop PDF in Illustrator and looking at the expanded layers panel, you will be able to isolate the path and release the clipping mask, as well as removing any other "fluff" so that you are only left with the image and the vector path. You can then stroke the vector path in your "CutContour" spot colour.

 

There will be pros/cons with whatever method you decide to use. I have not looked into what would provide the smoothest or automated workflow. As I mentioned earlier, I'm assuming that if you have to do a lot of this you'll need to find some form of automation, either in Photoshop+Illustrator or perhaps in Acrobat Pro (with or without add-on software).

 

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Nov 15, 2020 1
New Here ,
Nov 16, 2020

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Great, this solution suits me very well.

 

The vector is in its place and this manipulation avoids me to go back and forth in the 2 softwares.

 

Thank you very much for your help :]

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Nov 16, 2020 0