Eizo ColorEdge CG241W which monitor calibrator do you use?

Explorer ,
Jan 09, 2021

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I need to replace an outdated puck to calibrate my Eizo monitor after not having done it for some time.  I wonder if anyone has any suggestions for the puck to use?  I will be using the Eizio software (ColorNavigator 6.4.24.2) and need the puck for the calibration. In the past I had used xRite, but I am open to other suggestions.

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Eizo ColorEdge CG241W which monitor calibrator do you use?

Explorer ,
Jan 09, 2021

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I need to replace an outdated puck to calibrate my Eizo monitor after not having done it for some time.  I wonder if anyone has any suggestions for the puck to use?  I will be using the Eizio software (ColorNavigator 6.4.24.2) and need the puck for the calibration. In the past I had used xRite, but I am open to other suggestions.

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Jan 09, 2021 0
Community Beginner ,
Jan 09, 2021

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Slightly unrelated sinceI have an Eizo and use the built in calibrator but what luminence or brightness level do you plan to use? (cd/m2)

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Jan 09, 2021 0
Explorer ,
Jan 09, 2021

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Having recently watched Daniel Gregory's video on Color Management with David Cross's Photoshop Virtual Summit II, I was planning to use between 80-100 cd/m2.  I know that my prints when last I was printing, were too dark so Gregory says this means that the monitor is too bright.  When I had calibrated my monitor, the prints and the monitor were very much the same and I can see from my notes that I had used 80. 

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Jan 09, 2021 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 11, 2021

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westcopake, hi,

there are no "ideal" defaults for this 

IF you are viewing the screen in quite subdued light and the print is properly illuminated (i.e. in quite bright daylight) then a luminance target level of between 100 and 120 CDm2 usually works well.

But for both luminance and colour temperature (white point) the best way to get a really good match is to work through various target settings, gradually honing in on the 'visual match' to a properly illuminated reference print or proof.

I use this http://www.colourmanagement.net/products/icc-profile-verification-kit

 

I hope this helps
neil barstow, colourmanagement net :: adobe forum volunteer
google me "neil barstow colourmanagement" for lots of free articles on colour management
[please only use the blue reply button at the top of the page, this maintains the original thread title and chronological order of posts]

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Jan 11, 2021 0
Community Beginner ,
Jan 11, 2021

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This brings up an interesting aspect of color management - screen luminence. If printing is taken entirely out of the discussion - i.e. if you were doing your work solely to be displayed either on the web or on clients computers, then setting of brightness or luminence of the monitor is different. A picture edited with low ambient light with a setting of 100cd/m2 will be look identical if viewed in a brightly lit room with a monitor setting of 200cd/m2. This effect can be duplicated in Photoshop - edit a picture with the Photoshop backround black then make the Photoshop workspace white - the picture will now look too dark (pupils have constricted). What this means is that if all your client's monitors are set to 200cd/m2 AND they are viewing in the same ambient light conditions as you edited in with your monitor at 100cd/m2, your work will look too light. If their monitors are set to 200cd/m2 and they are viewing in a bright room, your work will look perfect. My point is that dealing not with printing, but only with the web and clients, the setting of luminence becomes quite entangled. I don't have an easy answer, just throwing it out there. Thanks.

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Jan 11, 2021 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 11, 2021

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Lynne, The i1 display pro is a good reasonably priced calibrator,

I prefer to use it with basICColor display 6 software as it carries out a very thorough assessment of the display characteristics. more here (free 14 day demo-version)

https://www.colourmanagement.net/products/basiccolor/basiccolor-display-software/

 

I hope this helps
neil barstow, colourmanagement net :: adobe forum volunteer
google me "neil barstow colourmanagement" for lots of free articles on colour management
[please only use the blue reply button at the top of the page, this maintains the original thread title and chronological order of posts]

 

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Jan 11, 2021 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 11, 2021

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The i1 Display Pro is the obvious choice.

 

The Spyders are generally better than their somewhat bad reputation, but don't buy the cheap Express edition just for the sensor. I have a suspicion that they dump their off-spec sensors here.

 

In any case, the i1 is rock solid and always the safe choice.

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Jan 11, 2021 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 11, 2021

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I use an I1Display Pro here with Colour Navigator 7 - rock solid 🙂

Dave

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