Enlarging a photo

New Here ,
Feb 08, 2021 Feb 08, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hello. I am new to Photoshop. I am taking photos of oil paintings with a Canon 90D camera. My original photos are 4640 px by 6960 px at 300 pixels/inch from the camera.  I need to enlarge them to roughly 9000 px by 12000 px at 300 pixel/inch for a printing project. When I select "image size" and change the dimensions, I assume I am to keep the pixels/inch at 300 with resampling. Should I chose "Preserve Details (enlargement)" under the resampling tab? What percentage of noise reduction is recommended? Are there any other recommendations or better ways to enlarge my images (sharpening, other techniques, etc)? Thank you for your help.

TOPICS
How to

Views

84

Likes

translate

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 08, 2021 Feb 08, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

You may not need such a file...

 

* What is the final print size in CM or Inches?

* What is the printing method?

* What is the image content?

* What is the viewing distance/conditions?

 

Take a look at this recent topic and search the forum for similar questions where this is discussed many times over:

 

https://community.adobe.com/t5/photoshop/working-with-large-files/td-p/11813729

 

The image size window offers a preview, if you must resample, use the settings that you think look good for the actual content.

 

 

Likes

translate

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Most Valuable Participant ,
Feb 08, 2021 Feb 08, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

You do not need to print a 30" br 40" image at a 300ppi resolution. Your 4640x6960 image printed at a 155ppi will print 30" x 45" and most likely be acceptable to you. Your image has a 2:3 aspect ratio  not a 3:4 aspect ratio.

JJMack

Likes

translate

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
New Here ,
Feb 08, 2021 Feb 08, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hello te recomiendo algún tutorial de youtube te explican bien solo has la busqueda exacta y te saldrá lo que nestas buscando. les dejo un enlace hacia mi sitio web https://telecomunicacionesyredes.net/empresas/vodafone-group/

Likes

translate

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 08, 2021 Feb 08, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

"I need to enlarge them to roughly 9000 px by 12000 px at 300 pixel/inch"

 

No you don't. "300 ppi" is the most persistent myth in the history of digital imaging. You don't need that for large format prints, that is, anything bigger than a book.

 

The bigger it is, the lower the ppi requirement, because it will be seen from farther away:

ppi2.png

7000 x 4600 pixels is enough pixels to work for anything, from a book spread to a wall-sized banner - as long as the photo itself is of good quality (infinitely more important). Enlarging will never improve anything, it will only degrade the image. It will inevitably end up looking worse than if you had just left it alone.

 

The only justification for upsampling, ever, is to avoid visible pixels, which is not even remotely possible in this case.

Likes

translate

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines