Highlighted

Filters simulating dark glasses

New Here ,
Nov 09, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I'm trying to get my photos to look more like what I see when wearing my prescription dark glasses, which are polarised, and give a wider and more interesting colour range than the photos, - any suggestions on suitable filters welcome. 

many thanks Richard 

TOPICS
Feature request, How to

Views

35

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more

Filters simulating dark glasses

New Here ,
Nov 09, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I'm trying to get my photos to look more like what I see when wearing my prescription dark glasses, which are polarised, and give a wider and more interesting colour range than the photos, - any suggestions on suitable filters welcome. 

many thanks Richard 

TOPICS
Feature request, How to

Views

36

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Nov 09, 2020 0
Most Valuable Participant ,
Nov 09, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

You would have to read up on HDR workflows to really bring out those details. If you have a reasonably high fidelity Raw camera this should not be much of an issue, but if you're relying on simple cameras that only spit out JPEGs or use a mobile device, this will be a lot harder. You can of course always try a quick & dirty method with the Vibrance and Hue/ Saturation adjustment layers along with some Curves to increase contrast, but it will stil lrequire soemn experimentation.

 

Mylenium

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Nov 09, 2020 1
New Here ,
Nov 10, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thanks to all who have responded to what was a passing thought, you've given me quite a bit to think about, I'll have to research this a lot more!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Nov 10, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 09, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

The obvious answer is to put a polarizer on the lens...here's a comparison:

pola.jpg

 

Achieving the exact same effect later is simply not possible. But increasing midtone contrast with an S-curve will also increase midtone saturation, so it will go a little bit of the way.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Nov 09, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 09, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

If you photograph in raw format and edit with Adobe Camera Raw (or Lightroom), or if you select a non-raw layer in Photoshop and choose Filter > Camera Raw Filter, the Dehaze option in there can roughly approximate some of the haze reduction, contrast enhancement, and color intensity that you get from polarization. The Clarity option might also help.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Nov 09, 2020 1