Huge 15 meter image in Photoshop ?

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Dec 21, 2020

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Hi ! I could need some advice I ´m going to do sort of a collage which will be on a 15 meter wall. So far I thought the best option would be to do  a 1:10 version make sure the dpi are enough to enlarge it to 15 meters ( I know they are going to print it in 15 parts but producing 15 pieces which in the end should fit together is way to complicated ) So I was hoping some of you guys have some experience with producing something this size. Vectorizing is not an option. Some part are 3d renders and some are photos . 

I´m supposed to deliver a psd file or pdf ready for print but I´m pretty sure that the image would be way beyond 2GB so saving in PSB is my only option I guess. Your advice is very much appreciated. THX!

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Huge 15 meter image in Photoshop ?

New Here ,
Dec 21, 2020

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Hi ! I could need some advice I ´m going to do sort of a collage which will be on a 15 meter wall. So far I thought the best option would be to do  a 1:10 version make sure the dpi are enough to enlarge it to 15 meters ( I know they are going to print it in 15 parts but producing 15 pieces which in the end should fit together is way to complicated ) So I was hoping some of you guys have some experience with producing something this size. Vectorizing is not an option. Some part are 3d renders and some are photos . 

I´m supposed to deliver a psd file or pdf ready for print but I´m pretty sure that the image would be way beyond 2GB so saving in PSB is my only option I guess. Your advice is very much appreciated. THX!

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Dec 21, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 21, 2020

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Some thoughts:

– As always, when you've finished your composition keep your layered file in case you need to return to it to make further changes.

– Work in RGB color mode (do not convert it to CMYK).

– Are you going to print this yourself on a desktop printer, or put it out to a commercial printer? If the latter, ask the printers for a spec.

– Print from a flattened format such as a PDF (possibly PDF/X-4) or a JPG.

– As the poster will be viewed from a distance you can have a low resolution, maybe around 50PPI

– By the way, resolution is defined as PPI (Pixels Per Inch), not DPI.

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Dec 21, 2020 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 21, 2020

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The key to this is not the 15 metres size but the viewing distance. Be realistic, and work out what is the distance at which the finished work will be viewed. It is not normal for such a large work to be viewed from 24 inches the way we would read a book.  Once you have that realsitic viewing distance, use the formula :

ppi required = 6878/Viewing distance in inches.

Any ppi over that is wasted, as our eyes will not resolve it.

 

Now that you have that ppi you can work out the pixel dimensions that you need to work.  You may find that means you don't need anything particularly special. On the other hand, if it is to be viewed at 24 inches then you may find that you will need to split it, or increase the capability of your PC considerably in order to produce it in one piece.

 

Dave

 

 

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Dec 21, 2020 4
D Fosse LATEST
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 21, 2020

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As a general rule of thumb, larger prints do not normally require a bigger file. If your file exceeds, say, 10 to 15 000 pixels on the long side, you should stop and ask yourself whether it's really necessary. Usually it isn't.

 

The reason is as Dave says. The eye really wants to take in the whole, so with a bigger print you step back. It's physically uncomfortable to go right up to a wall-sized print. It's just visually confusing and unpleasant and you are pulled back whether you want to or not.

 

Now, this is under the assumption that it's all seen as one image. If you have separate images side by side, intended to be viewed separately, treat them as such.

 

Here's how it works. Extrapolate as necessary:

ppi1.png

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Dec 21, 2020 3