Images pixel size seems completely wrong 22.4 M1 Mac

New Here ,
May 17, 2021 May 17, 2021

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I used to work on my previous Mac which was like not smaller than this one in photoshop and making a 1000x1000 pixel image with 72 ppi and it didn't quite fit my narrow sized (just to close only half of the screen) photoshop so it was sth like 66% sized in my view. Now I have the same size of image 1000x1000 pixel showing just as big as this 66% but on 100%, which seems completely wrong.

 

Also a collage which is 950px and which actual size in preview is showing like this (watch the screen) is showing super-small in the photoshop it doesn't look right. I thought it would be the resolution issue, but I tried making the same size new file 150-300-500 ppi and it still shows super small. What am I doing wrong? It's a new computer and a new photoshop, so I might be missing some settings. I tried hitting the 'Actual size' but it just went to 387% on view and it was actuall much-much bigger than the actual size and its resolution.

 

On the picture you can see actual size picture (which is 950 which should take like 70% of my screen) and it's somehow actual size 100% version on photoshop. So weird and annoying

Screenshot 2021-05-17 at 23.04.06.png

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 17, 2021 May 17, 2021

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Your screenshot indicates that your horizontal screen resolution is 2880 pixels.

So an image 950 px wide should take up almost exactly one third of the screen at 100% view.

If your previous Mac had a horizontal screen resolution of 1920 pixels, the same image would occupy almost exactly half the screen width at 100% view.

At 100%, Photoshop displays one image pixel for one screen pixel, and the pixels are much smaller on your new Mac, so the image will occupy a smaller area of the screen.

 

I'm not a Mac user, but I'm guessing that the screen is classified as Retina, in which case web browsers, and probably the Finder and Preview, will display them at 200%. Photoshop cannot do this, it has to display correctly.

 

Also note that PPI does not affect screen viewing in any way.

PPI stands for Pixels Per Inch, and is used to calculate printed dimensions of an image.

Pixel dimensions divided by PPI value = Printed dimensions in inches.

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New Here ,
May 18, 2021 May 18, 2021

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well, okey. Thanks. so if I am doing an element for the page, I need to like do it at 200% view in photoshop? because, yeah, it does look twice as big on the web page than it is in my photoshop. And it looks awfully low-quiality when I do it at 200% too

That is damn confusing :(( so much for the new good retina screen huh?)

 

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 18, 2021 May 18, 2021

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Yes, Retina screens are over rated in my opinion, and many people don't understand the consequences when they buy one. The pixels are so small that images that aren't sharp look sharp at 100% view, and you have to use 200% to see if the image is sharp or not.

Since your images look blurred at 200%, your screen probably has a pixel density somewhere between a regular screen and a true Retina screen. To calculate the screen density, use a ruler to measure the width of your screen in inches.

Divide the horizontal screen pixel resolution with the width in inches, and you get the pixel density in pixels per inch (PPI).

 

I use a desktop computer with a 24" 1920 x 1200 screen that measures 20.5 "across, which gives a pixel density of 93.6. I find this ideal for image editing, since any problems, like blur, noise, chromatic aberration etc. are very easy to spot at 100%.

I also have a 13.9" laptop with a 3000 x 2000 screen. The pixel density is 260, and I have to view images at 200% in Photoshop and Lightroom to evaluate sharpness, etc.

 

The problem with web browsers displaying images at 200% on Retina screens can be fixed with website coding.

I'm not up to speed on current solutions, but I set up Retina images on my own website several years ago.

 

 

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