Is there such a thing as a simple answer in the Adobe world??? 😭😭😭

New Here ,
Feb 24, 2021 Feb 24, 2021

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Hey everybody!

 

I have wasted so much time so far on this, I'm really hoping someone out there might be able to help... Because I stress I am not a creative in any way, I'm actually a scientist, so this area couldn't be further from my forté!

 

My issue is so simple, or so I thought. And its solution should be too I'm sure. But I've spent so much time watching YT videos, and Adobe tutorials, and scouring the internet. And I still can't find a simple, succinct, to the point instruction 😭

 

My scenario... I'm taking the current pandemic-contrived hiatus as an opportunity to overhaul my company logo/printed marketing materials. The designer that's creating the logo has posted me some hard copy print samples to have a first glance at while he's away for the next couple of weeks. A photographer friend's created some amazing photographic contributions too. Having put the two together, we've both agreed that the final result will look awesome if some parts of the potential logos are changed from their current colour, to one of several key colours that appear within the imagery. Not sure which yet but I'll know it when I see it!

 

As I'm due to go in for surgery just as he returns, my plan was to have a rudimentary play around with the two elements over the next couple of weeks so's I can have made a decision by the time my designer is back from his trip. As I obviously don't have the digital files yet, for the purposes of what I'd like to visualise I've simply scanned the logo samples into PDFs which I've opened up in Photoshop. My intention was to simply change the colours of each of the logo components to each of the potential options, and print some rough samples off to pass around friends and family for feedback.

 

Ummmm.......yeah right! You wouldn't think I had a PhD in Molecular Biology!!! How hard can it be to simply change one colour to another, absolute, CMYK or hex coded colour?? And yet all every video/tutorial I've read and watched talks about is hues and saturations and layer masks...and believe me, I've watched many many many of them...so many hours of my life I won't get back 😭

 

Please someone, put me out of my misery... 

 

If you're able to give me a simple description of how to select the part of the page I want to change and change it to eg: #1f305e you will be my most favouritely fantastic person in the whole wide world 😍

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 24, 2021 Feb 24, 2021

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@michybas71 wrote:

As I obviously don't have the digital files yet, for the purposes of what I'd like to visualise I've simply scanned the logo samples into PDFs which I've opened up in Photoshop. My intention was to simply change the colours of each of the logo components to each of the potential options, and print some rough samples off to pass around friends and family for feedback.

 

Hi

The first question is: what application did your designer use to create the logo samples? Typically, logos are done in Illustrator. If you have the Illustrator file, there are several easy ways to change the colors, including the Recolor Artwork command.

 

If she/he did it in PS instead, they used layers, and it would still be doable, but not as easily.

 

But what you've done is scan the printed file, so everything is on one layer and Photoshop is looking at pixels, not logo components. To change the colors, you'll need to select each set of pixels that make up what you think of as a component, then put it on a new layer and change the color. Your success will depend on how good your selection skills are. You can use the selection tools, commands in the Selection menu, or draw paths with the Pen tool.

 

How good are your Photoshop skills?

 

~ Jane

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New Here ,
Feb 24, 2021 Feb 24, 2021

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Hi Jane, thanks for your reply. In answer, I don't have any! And obviously they're needed so my purchase is clearly a huge mistake, one which I've spent over 2 hours paying for in the form of the most frustratingly futile chat conversations I've ever had, trying to cancel my plan and get a refund. All I can say is as big as they are they must be suffering and desperate for customers! In over 2 hours I still haven't managed it and all they want to do is give me more and more free months to prevent me cancelling. 

Regards my issue, whilst I fully appreciate any comprehensive software offering is going to take time to learn in order to be able to utilise it fully, I had (stupidly) assumed that something as simple as changing the colour of something would be easy to achieve straight off! How wrong one can be.

 

I'm familiar with the layer format that PS functions under, god knows I've watched enough videos that talk about it. And yes, having scanned the printed sheet I'm in effect wishing to (simply 😂😂😂) change the colour of one particular part of that "picture" to an alternative colour.

Earlier I watched a tutorial that instructed > SELECT > COLOUR RANGE > Use dropper tool to select all pixels within the area that's to be changed (at which point they appear to "shimmer" to indicate selection) > SELECT > NEW ADJUSTMENT LAYER > Hue/Saturation. Within that dialogue box there is then the option to affect the colour of the area I've selected through various sliding scales. But not the option to change it to one singular and absolute predetermined colour (such as #1F305E) as previously mentioned.

 

The beginning of the process appears to fit with what I need to do, but I cannot find a single instruction as to how I change the selected pixels to a colour determined by any kind of RGB/CMYK/# colour code. I assume that at the > SELECT > NEW ADJUSTMENT LAYER > Hue/Saturation stage, I select some other kind of "NEW LAYER" rather than "ADJUSTMENT". But my lack of knowledge means I've been left baffled as to which?? And what on earth I do then.....

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 24, 2021 Feb 24, 2021

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First, you can get a full refund if you cancel within 14 days. Here's how:

https://helpx.adobe.com/manage-account/using/cancel-subscription.html

 

If your designer did this in Illustrator, and if you have the Illustrator files, then you can click on each object and change the color to anything you want. It's harder in PS because PS does not see "objects" on a scanned image, only pixels, and getting a good selection for each different color is the first step. Each thing that you look at as an object needs to be on its own layer. A layer mask in non-destructive and hides the areas you don't want to changes. 

 

If the artwork was done properly in PS, it also would not be as hard. The reason it's hard is that it's scanned in and mashed into one layer.

 

That being said, did you try a solid color fill layer?

https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/using/adjustment-fill-layers.html

 

If you are new to PS as you are, then this is a complex job.

 

If you have trouble cancelling, then contact Adobe Customer Care:
https://helpx.adobe.com/contact.html
Click the chat icon in the lower right and type "agent" so you get a human and not a bot.

 

~ Jane

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 24, 2021 Feb 24, 2021

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The reason you're having such as hard time is because Photoshop is a pixel-based photo editing app. Logos are usually vector graphics created in Illustrator. In Illustrator making such a change would be much easier (assuming you have the original vector file, and not a version that was converted to pixels). A pixel-based file (such as a scan, or file exported from Illustrator as a PNG, JPEG, etc) will not be as easy to edit because the elements are not seperate shapes as they originally were in Illustrator.


— Adobe Certified Expert & Instructor at Noble Desktop | Web Developer, Designer, InDesign Scriptor

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 24, 2021 Feb 24, 2021

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@Dan Rodney I'm confused. Is this different from what I said?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 24, 2021 Feb 24, 2021

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Nope, great minds think alike. I had a tab open with this thread and it took a while to respond. It didn't show your response yet so it looks like you beat me to it 🙂


— Adobe Certified Expert & Instructor at Noble Desktop | Web Developer, Designer, InDesign Scriptor

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 24, 2021 Feb 24, 2021

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@Dan Rodney wrote:

Nope, great minds think alike.

 

Thanks, Dan!  😊  In addition, we both knew the correct answer.

 

~ Jane

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 24, 2021 Feb 24, 2021

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Community Beginner ,
Feb 24, 2021 Feb 24, 2021

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Since you have a rasterized version of the logo, you can't go in and select the paths and change their fill directly. One way is to select colors with "Color Range" in the Select menu. Eyedropper the color you want to select, edit fuzziness if there are gradients or to tweak the selection. White areas are being selected, black is not. Once you have your marching ant selection, you can edit it more with Select and Mask in the Select menu, or use the Lasso tool to trim or add parts. Ok, with your selection, make a Solid Color adjustment layer, which will make a new layer of color with an automatically created mask of your selection that you had selected. Do this over and over for all your key colors. If you have 4 colors, you will have 4 layers now on top of your original. You are just stacking layers upon layers in Photoshop! Hope this works!

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New Here ,
Feb 24, 2021 Feb 24, 2021

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Quick tricks and instructions written for the stem brain if that fails:

 

 

Super simple, very bad:

 

press the foreground color in the toolbar on the right. That's the two overlapping boxes, the bigger pair, the upper one. You get a color mixer. Pick your color.

Long-press the last button in the toolbar on the left side, usually it's three dots. You should see a menu, and on it you should find the Paint Bucket tool. Use the paint bucket tool to fill your selected color into the color areas. 

 

Done.

 

Still simple, slightly better.
if it's a computer generated file with completly flat colors (no shadows or gradients), you can just use the magic wand tool to select the color area. If the color is in many areas, hold down the shift button on your keyboard to pick multiple areas. 

Then you should have the part selected. To make the selection more loose, or less loose, change the Tolerance, it's a number box up top, under the menu. It only appears while the magic wand is selected. 

 

Once you have what you want selected, mix the color you want by pressing the foreground color, then use alt-backspace (on the mac) to fill the region. If you're on the pc, it's either alt or one of those buttons in that region. Experiment!

 

Done.

 

If you're happy with the selection, but want a method that helps you change things quickly over and over, just do this: While you have a selection that you like, go into the layers pallete. Press the circle which is half black and half white, choose Solid Color, pick a color, press enter. Then you have an object, a layer object in fact, you can change over and over. Just double-click it.  

 

If this is really not working, it's time to figure out why not. And since you're a molecular biologist, I'm gonna venture and say that theory might help where long-winding tutorials failed.

 

Art Nerd Stuff For Stem Nerd Peeps:

I'm gonna tell you a bit about colors and transparency, maybe that will make what the tools do self-evident. I don't know what you know, so skip over what you find obvious.

 

Simple color picking really only works when the colors are flat. If your designer did the logo with flat colors in illustrator, and it hasn't been printed and then photographed or scanned, this should work. But if the logo has shadows or colors that wash into each other, you are no longer making a simple mathematical selection. It's not one point in the color spectrum, but a grouping, a cluster in a field.

 

You understand color values. You may well know most of this. To explain these tools, I'm gonna present them as dimensions. Grayscale is one dimension. Just a line that starts at black and ends at white. RGB is three dimensions, for each of those colors. RGB is measured light. So in one corner you have black, all the lights are off. one corner is white, all lights on. and everywhere else is different mixtures of the three colors, as lights mix. CMYK is paints mixing. Let's just 0skip that.

 

There is another color mode, and its easier to understand. HSB, hue saturation brightness. 

 

I like HSB because it's the easiest to understand, and it's the most powerful way to change colors. Brightness: Brighter, darker. Saturation: Stronger color or more muted. So zero saturation is gray. A picture rich in colors is saturated. Hue? that's the color wheel. The rainbow. So if you move the hue slider, you're sliding across the rainbow scale. Or color wheel scale if rainbow talk is to unicorny.

 

Get your head around HSB and photoshop is your oyster. 

 

Anyway. 

 

If you pick just one color, it's one dot in that space. The color selection tools expand the dot into a sphere. 

 

Photoshop has one more dimension: transparency. A mask adds a transparency channel to the red green and blue channels, so you can see through some bits and some not, and some are quasi-transparent. A selection is just a temporary transparency channel.

 

The magic wand creates a crude, hard line selection, just thinks in hard black and hard white. Select > Color Range uses a fuzzy ball in the color space to capture the range of colors you want, more or less. 

 

If neither work, Select > Select and Mask uses AI to automagic things, and you have to instruct it with brushes that work in a very abstract way. It's the absolute best of the lot, quickest too, but the only way to learn how to use it is just to mess around with it. 

 

Hope you're ok with the language, I go simple and slow so you can speed-read and jump up and down to create the mental picture, that's what works for me. 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 25, 2021 Feb 25, 2021

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I have to admit that you almost lost me in your very first paragraph in which you suggested that creativity and science are mutually exclusive. For starters, how would you shoehorn Einstein’s extraordinary thought experiments into that statement?  In addition, as a person headed for surgery, be thankful that those two elements -- science and creativity -- are totally compatible, should an unexpected and unprepared for event present itself. 

 

I will leave the Photoshop part of your request to the expert advice offered by my pal @jane-e and add one more suggestion:

In your post you wrote “…print some rough samples off to pass around friends and family for feedback.” If you are serious about your product or service it would be prudent to reach  out to a marketing expert experienced in sales to your chosen audience, and rely in large measure on his or her advice regarding your logo and auxiliary printed material. Your family and friends, wonderful and well-intentioned as they may be, are no match for a professional in the creative and scientific fields of market research and prediction. Simply, it's worth the bucks.  

 

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 25, 2021 Feb 25, 2021

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@norman.sanders , I'm glad you mentioned the "passing around to family and friends" part. I debated saying it more than a dozen times, but wasn't sure how to word it. You said it well.

 

~ Jane

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Contributor ,
Feb 26, 2021 Feb 26, 2021

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To michybas71:  After carefully reviewing this string and evaluating your struggle, I highly support the expert advice given by the four Community Pros.  

It may be helpful to just create a colour palette of your favourites, for now, until your designer returns.  If the designer provided only print samples, they may have had a very practical reason to do so.  One reason may be that the project did ask for print materials, to start; the second reason is that the designer will suspect that your monitor(s) of devices are not calibrated.

Experience shows that what people see on their monitors, generally, is far from accurate or correct, and is almost never what they saw it as, before being printed - unless it is directed by someone who uses calibrated devices and knows colour - someone like the designer.  

So even if you "see" and think that #1f305e is "the colour" it will not be "that colour" when printed on different materials, and as compared to being viewed on an un-calibrated device.   The designer probably wants to give you a WYSIWYG example - hence the print.  

However, if you are determined to solve this for yourself, this last suggestion is a hack and full of potential for bad outcomes:  With a reasonably decent digital camera take a snap of each of the printed materials, in daylight (not direct sunlight) and with a grey-card or grey point reference in each frame.  This will give you an actual digital camera-image that you can open directly in Photoshop.

From the rest of the advice and direction given by the Pros in this string, you can then apply subject selection and colour changes to your heart's desire, ... or until your designer returns.

Wish you all the best outcomes!

F. Quill

PS v22..., LR, OM-D EM ... 

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