jpg in hi-res

New Here ,
Apr 29, 2021 Apr 29, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

hi,

I created a project in photoshop and I need to send it to the printing house in CMYK profile and jpg format.
How can I save in jpg format without loosing quality? what is the best hi-res?


thanks! shir

TOPICS
Community Information, How to

Views

208

Likes

translate

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 29, 2021 Apr 29, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Let me move this to the Photoshop forum for you, which is the appropriate forum for your question.

The Using the Community forum is for help in using the Adobe Support Community forums, not for help with specific programs. Product questions should be posted in the associated product community.

Likes

translate

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 29, 2021 Apr 29, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

These are questions you should ask the printing house as they will have their own set of requirements. The is much that happens behind the scene when converting an image from RGB to CMYK, so it's best to have them walk you through their specific requirements.

warmly/j

Likes

translate

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 29, 2021 Apr 29, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

»How can I save in jpg format without loosing quality?«

How can you make a square circle? 

In order to decrease its filesize the point of jpg’s lossy compression IS to change the image – imperceptibly in many cases, but nonetheless.

(As far as I know the jpg convention technically includes non-lossy compression but that has no bearing on jpg-files as we use them, which are jfif files … if I remember correctly.)

 

The printers did provide you with the correct CMYK Profile?  

Likes

translate

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 29, 2021 Apr 29, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Why is the printer asking for a jpg? They should be able to accept a .pdf. 

Likes

translate

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 29, 2021 Apr 29, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Well, if they want jpeg, just send a jpeg.

 

File > Save As > jpeg. Quality 10 is a good compromise between file size and not too much degradation (there will always be some with jpeg, even at "max", so there's actually little point in going all the way up to 12).

 

But first of all, if they want CMYK, you need to know which CMYK. This is important! There is no such thing as just "CMYK". Every CMYK profile corresponds to a specific printing process, and you need to know which one. Otherwise you may get color shifts and all kinds of issues like ink smearing and drying problems.

 

The Photoshop default just happens to be US Web Coated (SWOP) v2, but that may not be the right one. If you're outside the Americas, it will certainly not be the right one.

Likes

translate

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines