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opening files at 300dpi

Community Beginner ,
Jul 25, 2020

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Hello... I have searched and cannot find an answewr to this question.... I recently had a new computer built and I reinstalled my CC photoshop, lightroom and bridge. BEFORE I made this change, when I opened a photo (shot on a Canon 5dsr 50MP camera) my files would open with the following demensions... 8688ppi x 5792ppi @ 300ppi resulting in a photo size of 28.96in x 19.307in..... NOW, after the new computer build and photoshop, lightroom and bridge 2020 install..... my files open with these demesions.... 8688ppi x 5792ppi @ 240ppi... with a resulting size being 36.2in x 24.133in....

I know this may be trivial and I know I can easily change the files size to 300ppi after I open them......

BUT..... my question is, HOW do I set photoshop to open the file automatically to the 300ppi demesions???

I am used to my previous work flow and having them open at the 300ppi demensions is wha I am used to for my workflow and what I prefer to have...

any and all help is appriciated.... Thansk in advance....Dave

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opening files at 300dpi

Community Beginner ,
Jul 25, 2020

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Hello... I have searched and cannot find an answewr to this question.... I recently had a new computer built and I reinstalled my CC photoshop, lightroom and bridge. BEFORE I made this change, when I opened a photo (shot on a Canon 5dsr 50MP camera) my files would open with the following demensions... 8688ppi x 5792ppi @ 300ppi resulting in a photo size of 28.96in x 19.307in..... NOW, after the new computer build and photoshop, lightroom and bridge 2020 install..... my files open with these demesions.... 8688ppi x 5792ppi @ 240ppi... with a resulting size being 36.2in x 24.133in....

I know this may be trivial and I know I can easily change the files size to 300ppi after I open them......

BUT..... my question is, HOW do I set photoshop to open the file automatically to the 300ppi demesions???

I am used to my previous work flow and having them open at the 300ppi demensions is wha I am used to for my workflow and what I prefer to have...

any and all help is appriciated.... Thansk in advance....Dave

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Most Valuable Participant ,
Jul 25, 2020

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File Size and Image sizes does not change with 300 DPI resolution. Print size changes the The image has the same number of pixels the files size remains the same the Pixel print size changes.  If you want to set a different pixel size its set in the ACR workflow preferences.  Its use to set the printer pixel size you can set it any time before you print.  However it should be set  quite high to begin with if you intent to print.  For Photoshop uses this setting to calculate ruler units.  When you set tools to do 1 inch Photoshop will use the resolution setting. 240, 300  its important for tool like Canvas size, transform  ets.   I usually aways have a height document resolution.   For its important for print to have many high quality pixels.  Resolution is meaningless on the web only number of pixels matter. Displays have one size pixel they can not change their pixel size they have a fixed resolution. And a fixed number of Pixels. A 4k TV displays image is 3840px by 2160px be it  a 32" tv or 70" TV the have different pixel sizes.

 

 

If you print huge prints  you will be better of using a lower resolution like 100 DPI.  Huge prints do not need to be print with high resolution pixels for the prints will normally not be viewed close up where the human eye can resolve down to 300 DPI.  With a lower resolution the document size will be much smaller than a 300dpi document.  Photoshop will perform better,  The 300DPI document would be 9 times as larges and be overkill printed and Photoshop performance would be slowed.

JJMack

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 25, 2020

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Double-click the Preferences link at the bottom of the Camera RAW dialog and set how how you want the image to open. To get the 8688ppi x 5792ppi @ 300ppi, 28.96in x 19.307in, image uncheck Resize to Fit: Default, and set the Resolution to 300 pixels/inch:

 

Screen Shot 3.png

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 25, 2020

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FWIW, this setting (300PPI, 240PPI) is rather meaninless. PPI has absolutely no role in quality per se. It is simply a resolution tag. The tag could be 240PPI or 300PPI but it doesn't have an inherent meaning, only what you could produce with the number of pixels you have at your disposal. Work with pixels! For example, let us say you have 1000x1000 pixels to keep the math simple. And to simplify this further, let's only consider the horizontal axis. If you have 1000 pixels and divide that by 72, that is, you provide 72 pixels per inch, you could end up with 13.8 inches using that division (1000/72=13.8). Let's now say you divide up your 1000 pixels using 180 instead. 1000/180=5.5. In both cases, you had 1000 total pixels. The document itself doesn't have a size, other than what space it takes up on your hard drive. The sizes above are examples of what could be produced if you divided up the total number of pixels you have, with some number of which is just a tag within the document.

In Photoshop, if you use the Image Size dialog, turn resample OFF (do not allow it to create more or remove pixels), you can enter any value, 72, 180, 300, 1000 into the resolution field and the resulting size is calculated for you. But you haven’t changed the document or the data at all, just that tag. You just changed a theoretical 'size' if you output your 1000 pixels using that resolution. So again, it's meaningless until you output the data. At that point, lets say you print the image, you can decide how big you wish it to appear and/or how many pixels you want to devote to the output. You have 1000 pixels and someone tells you that you must use 300DPI (which isn't true but that's a different story). 1000/300 would produce a 3.3 inch print. You want a bigger print? Lower the DPI (within reason). You set the DPI for output to use 180 of your pixels to produce 180DPI? You get a 5.5 inch print (1000/180=5.5).
Work with pixels. That's a fixed attribute of the data unless of course you resample that data (add or remove pixels). 

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JJMack LATEST
Most Valuable Participant ,
Jul 25, 2020

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Its important that Photoshop add a good amoumt of pixels for printing high resolition quality image so the setting is actually important when you add an inch of camvas you want 300ppi added not 72ppi added.

JJMack

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