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Photos edited on MacBook Pro are warmer and have green tint when viewed on iPhones

New Here ,
Jul 14, 2020

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Before you ask, yes, I converted to sRGB when saving for web. Additionally, my monitor's display profile is the default Color LCD, and my proof condition is the default "Working CMYK". I've also compared with different iPhones so it's not a problem with my particular device.

 

I have to constantly adjust the tint of the images on my iPhone because it is a significant difference, BUT  that alone still doesn't give me the accurate colors and tones. This is most noticeable in my blue skies that become aqua when viewing on iPhones.    

 

I've seen other people have this problem with no real answer other than "make sure the 'convert to sRGB' box is checked when exporting for web." And plenty of photographers choose not to invest in a calibrator because they do fine without, telling me that the differences aren't significant enough for them to worry about it and that it's not a crucial tool for most professionals.

 

So, is there actually a solution other than that?

 

 

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Photos edited on MacBook Pro are warmer and have green tint when viewed on iPhones

New Here ,
Jul 14, 2020

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Before you ask, yes, I converted to sRGB when saving for web. Additionally, my monitor's display profile is the default Color LCD, and my proof condition is the default "Working CMYK". I've also compared with different iPhones so it's not a problem with my particular device.

 

I have to constantly adjust the tint of the images on my iPhone because it is a significant difference, BUT  that alone still doesn't give me the accurate colors and tones. This is most noticeable in my blue skies that become aqua when viewing on iPhones.    

 

I've seen other people have this problem with no real answer other than "make sure the 'convert to sRGB' box is checked when exporting for web." And plenty of photographers choose not to invest in a calibrator because they do fine without, telling me that the differences aren't significant enough for them to worry about it and that it's not a crucial tool for most professionals.

 

So, is there actually a solution other than that?

 

 

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How to, Mac, Problem or error

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 14, 2020

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Hi

converting to sRGB is the right step.

Working CMYK softproof is entirely irrelevant for an RGB output for an iOS device. 

 

So this issue not just on one iPhone? In what application are you viewing?

As its happening over multiple handheld devices then this would seem to in dictate an issue with your mac screen.

The default "ColorLCD" profile IS accepted by many users with macbooks, but it is absolutely right to say that for serious imaging and, certainly, no matter the opinion of others, for professional use - the screen should ideally be properly calibrated and profiled. Some manage without for sure but it's not ideal. I spent 20 years as a pro photographer myself and work with many photographers on colour management.. 

 

Colour management is there to help solve issues like the one you have currently. 

 

How old is your macbook? It may have developed a magenta tint.

 

Here's a test, download this testimage

https://www.colourmanagement.net/downloads/CMnet_Pixl_AdobeRGB_testimage05.zip

open and view it in Photoshop, since it contains memory colours such a skin-tone and neutrals it should be fairly obvious if it's way wrong. 

What's your opinion of its appearance?

Next try converting to sRGB, saving whilst embedding the profile and viewing on the iOS device. 

Same difference?

 

I hope this helps

if so, please "like" my reply and if you're OK now, please mark it as "correct", so that others who have similar issues can see the solution

thanks

neil barstow, colourmanagement.net :: adobe forum volunteer

[please do not use the reply button on a message within the thread, only use the blue reply button at the top of the page, this maintains the original thread title and chronological order of posts]

 

 

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New Here ,
Jul 28, 2020

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I followed your instructions and I don't think the problem is with my photoshop. Regardless of where I viewed it on my computer, it looked fine.

However, it is slightly more magenta when viewing it on my computer than on my phone.

 

My macbook is almost 5 years old.

 

What should I look into if I do decide to go the calibration route? I'm a college student, so perhaps something that won't break the bank.

 

Thanks

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