Photoshop and Mac Retina Display

New Here ,
Dec 23, 2020

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I see where this question has been asked many times, and I have followed all directions I've read up on. I'm still having issues. I just bought a brand new 16" MacBook Pro. I've also downloaded the latest version of PS. I can not for the life of me remember what I did on my previous Mac to make the image dimensions correct. I've gone to Units and Rulers and changed to 220. I've also unchecked the "Resample" option that was suggested. So far no luck. 

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Photoshop and Mac Retina Display

New Here ,
Dec 23, 2020

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I see where this question has been asked many times, and I have followed all directions I've read up on. I'm still having issues. I just bought a brand new 16" MacBook Pro. I've also downloaded the latest version of PS. I can not for the life of me remember what I did on my previous Mac to make the image dimensions correct. I've gone to Units and Rulers and changed to 220. I've also unchecked the "Resample" option that was suggested. So far no luck. 

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Mac, Problem or error

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Dec 23, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 23, 2020

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What is incorrect about it?

Photoshop 100% zoom is not a physical size but means 1 image pixel mapped onto 1 screen pixel. That is it.

 

Many browsers scale the image on retina screens (i.e. use 4 screen pixels to represent 1 image pixel). If you want to simulate that, just use 200% zoom.

 

Dave

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Dec 23, 2020 0
New Here ,
Dec 23, 2020

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It's showing up way bigger than it should. I keyed in 450px by 156px (which is the size I needed for the banner I'm making). The dimensions are showing 450x156, but the actual canvas on my screen looks like I'm doing something with a 5x7 photo.

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Dec 23, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 23, 2020

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At what zoom level ?

Dave

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Dec 23, 2020 0
New Here ,
Dec 23, 2020

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100%. These are the directions that helped me on my previous MacBook, but no luck so far:

 

https://www.thegraphicmac.com/how-to-make-photoshops-100-view-actually-be-100/

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 23, 2020

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That article shows a misunderstanding of what 100% zoom in Photoshop means and does.

 

Like I said above 100% zoom is not a physical size (it has nothing to do with letter size, A4 size or any other physical measurement).

In Photoshop 100% zoom (as set in View > 100% ) maps 1 image pixel onto 1 screen pixel. That  means the physical size on screen will vary according to the density of pixels on your screen. On a retina screen that will produce a very small screen image at 450px x 156 px  I think the macbook pro screen has a pixel density off 225ppi which means the banner will take up 2 inches by 0.7 inches.  That is the way it is designed and the way it is meant to work in order to avoid any scaling of the image for critical viewing.

 

If you want the screen size to match physical dimensions entered in image size (i.e. match the size that will be printed, then you will need to set the screen resolution in Preferences > Rulers to match the actual ppi of your retina screen (use the screen specs i.e.225ppi not a reported ppi as some applications report the ppi at half the actual amount). Then use View > Print Size. (View >Actual Size may also work if your screen reports its ppi correctly - but many do not).

 

 

Dave

 

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Dec 23, 2020 1
New Here ,
Dec 23, 2020

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Thank you for all your help! Heading off to try the suggestions now!

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Dec 23, 2020 0
Conrad C LATEST
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 23, 2020

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This is a very confusing topic, and it’s getting more confusing because a lot of the info on the web is out of date by many years.

 

For print, it should be much simpler now. Photoshop added the View > Actual Size command, and if you choose that, your Photoshop rulers (and document size) should match a real world print.

 

For web, mobile, and video, Actual Size doesn’t work because it has to refer to the document ppi resolution, which doesn’t apply to web/mobile/video. And 100% magnification doesn’t work well for web design on Retina displays, because 100% means one display pixel to one screen pixel (in any photo editor, not just Photoshop). That is not how web browsers and mobile device screens work; they show 100% image size at one image pixel equals one device independent pixel, which is 2x on a Mac Retina (or Windows HiDPI) display. In other words, if you upload your 450 x 156 px banner to a web browser on a Mac Retina display, take a screen shot, and measure the banner in the screen shot, it will say it’s 900 x 312 px (2x what you expected), due to the web browser enlarging the image 200% to compensate for the Retina display’s double pixel density.

 

100%-Photoshop-vs-Safari-1x-vs-2x.png

 

If you are designing for web/mobile and want to see an “actual size” magnification in Photoshop, using 200% magnification works well (choose View > 200%), and you can map a keyboard shortcut to it (such as Command-1). That does the same thing the web browser does: Blow up the image 200% to compensate for the 2x pixel density of a Retina/HiDPI display.

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