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Photoshop Image printed green/colours dull

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Aug 05, 2020

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Hi all, 
New to this forum and first time posting. I have recently purchased a new desktop computer and edited my first lot of images on it yesterday and took them to print today however when they were printed they were very dull and sickly looking when on my screen and having had the image sent to my phone to view on my phone also they colours were truly vibrant and beautiful. 
Can anyone advise why this may be occuring?

NOTE: I had other images printed at the same time that were edited on my old laptop and the colours in them came out fine so I cant see it being an issue with the printers.

Thanks in advance! 

Anna

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by davescm | Adobe Community Professional

There are a few things could be wrong here.

1. Does your laptop have a wide gamut screen (often decribed by marketing as displaying 90+% of Adobe colors)? If so you need to use a calibration device to ensure the monitor profile in your operating system matches your screen. No ifs or buts, a wide gamut monitor must be profiled correctly.

Adjusting photographs on a monitor with the wrong profile is like painting the house through coloured sunglasses. You think you have perfect colours until someone else views them without the same glasses.

2. You don't say what color profile you used for your document. In itself that does not matter as Photoshop can work with a variety of color spaces , but if you are sending documents on to be printed you must embed that document profile with the images. If you are using a local high street printer that ignores the profile, then change printers, but you may get away with converting the documents to sRGB profile (but again embed the profile) and then getting them printed.

3. If you are printing yourself , then you need to set Photoshop to manage the colors and ansure that the correct profile for your printer and paper combination is chosen in the print dialogue.

Forget trying to match with a phone screen - they are not color managed and tend to show colours over-saturated.

 

To add to the above,

I just opened your first jpeg image. It has the ProPhoto color space embedded. That should never leave your computer and will only work with an external printer if they are fully colour managed. Convert your images to sRGB then send them to the printer.

 

A bit of background reading for you :

 

Colour Management simple explanation

Digital images are made up of numbers. In RGB mode, each pixel has a number representing Red, a number representing Green and a Number representing Blue. The problem comes in that different devices can be sent those same numbers but will show different colours. To see a demonstration of this, walk into your local T.V. shop and look at the different coloured pictures – all from the same material.

To ensure the output device is showing the correct colours then a colour management system needs to know two things.

1. What colours do the numbers in the document represent? 
This is the job of the document profile which describes the exact colour to be shown when Red=255 and what colour of white is meant when Red=255, Green = 255 and Blue =255. It also describes how the intermediate values move from 0 through to 255 – known as the tone response curve (or sometimes “gamma”).
Examples of colour spaces are (Adobe RGB1998, sRGB IEC61966-2.1)
With the information from the document profile, the colour management system knows what colour is actually represented by the pixel values in the document.

  1. What colour will be displayed on the printer/monitor if it is sent certain pixel values?
    This is the job of the monitor/printer & paper profile. It should describe exactly what colours the device is capable of showing and, how the device will respond when sent certain values.
    So with a monitor profile that is built to represent the specific monitor (or a printer profile built to represent the specific printer, ink and paper combination) then the colour management system can predict exactly what colours will be shown if it sends specific pixel values to that device.

    So armed with those two profiles, the colour management system will convert the numbers in the document to the numbers that must be sent to the device in order that the correct colours are displayed.

So what can go wrong :

  1. The colours look different in Photoshop, which is colour managed, to the colours in a different application which is not colour managed.
    This is not actually fault, but it is a commonly raised issue. It is the colour managed version which is correct – the none colour managed application is just sending the document RGB numbers to the output device regardless without any conversion regardless of what they represent in the document and the way they will be displayed on the output device.

  2. The colour settings are changed in Photoshop without understanding what they are for.
    This results in the wrong profiles being used and therefore the wrong conversions and the wrong colours.
    If Photoshop is set to Preserve embedded profiles – it will use the colour profile within the document.

  3. The profile for the output device is incorrect.
    The profile should represent the behaviour of the device exactly. If the wrong profile is used it will not. Equally if the settings on the device are changed in comparison to those settings when the profile was made, then the profile can no longer describe the behaviour of the device. Two examples would be using a printer profile designed for one paper, with a different paper. A second example would be using a monitor profile but changing the colour/contrast etc settings on the monitor.
    The monitor profile is set in the operating system (in Windows 10 that is under Settings>System>Display >Advanced) which leads to a potential further issue. Operating system updates can sometimes load a different monitor profile, or a broken profile, which no longer represents the actual monitor.

 

 

Colour management is simple to use provided the document profile is correct, always save or export with an embedded profile, and the monitor/printer profile is correct. All the math is done in the background.

 

I hope that helps

 

Dave

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Photoshop Image printed green/colours dull

New Here ,
Aug 05, 2020

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Hi all, 
New to this forum and first time posting. I have recently purchased a new desktop computer and edited my first lot of images on it yesterday and took them to print today however when they were printed they were very dull and sickly looking when on my screen and having had the image sent to my phone to view on my phone also they colours were truly vibrant and beautiful. 
Can anyone advise why this may be occuring?

NOTE: I had other images printed at the same time that were edited on my old laptop and the colours in them came out fine so I cant see it being an issue with the printers.

Thanks in advance! 

Anna

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by davescm | Adobe Community Professional

There are a few things could be wrong here.

1. Does your laptop have a wide gamut screen (often decribed by marketing as displaying 90+% of Adobe colors)? If so you need to use a calibration device to ensure the monitor profile in your operating system matches your screen. No ifs or buts, a wide gamut monitor must be profiled correctly.

Adjusting photographs on a monitor with the wrong profile is like painting the house through coloured sunglasses. You think you have perfect colours until someone else views them without the same glasses.

2. You don't say what color profile you used for your document. In itself that does not matter as Photoshop can work with a variety of color spaces , but if you are sending documents on to be printed you must embed that document profile with the images. If you are using a local high street printer that ignores the profile, then change printers, but you may get away with converting the documents to sRGB profile (but again embed the profile) and then getting them printed.

3. If you are printing yourself , then you need to set Photoshop to manage the colors and ansure that the correct profile for your printer and paper combination is chosen in the print dialogue.

Forget trying to match with a phone screen - they are not color managed and tend to show colours over-saturated.

 

To add to the above,

I just opened your first jpeg image. It has the ProPhoto color space embedded. That should never leave your computer and will only work with an external printer if they are fully colour managed. Convert your images to sRGB then send them to the printer.

 

A bit of background reading for you :

 

Colour Management simple explanation

Digital images are made up of numbers. In RGB mode, each pixel has a number representing Red, a number representing Green and a Number representing Blue. The problem comes in that different devices can be sent those same numbers but will show different colours. To see a demonstration of this, walk into your local T.V. shop and look at the different coloured pictures – all from the same material.

To ensure the output device is showing the correct colours then a colour management system needs to know two things.

1. What colours do the numbers in the document represent? 
This is the job of the document profile which describes the exact colour to be shown when Red=255 and what colour of white is meant when Red=255, Green = 255 and Blue =255. It also describes how the intermediate values move from 0 through to 255 – known as the tone response curve (or sometimes “gamma”).
Examples of colour spaces are (Adobe RGB1998, sRGB IEC61966-2.1)
With the information from the document profile, the colour management system knows what colour is actually represented by the pixel values in the document.

  1. What colour will be displayed on the printer/monitor if it is sent certain pixel values?
    This is the job of the monitor/printer & paper profile. It should describe exactly what colours the device is capable of showing and, how the device will respond when sent certain values.
    So with a monitor profile that is built to represent the specific monitor (or a printer profile built to represent the specific printer, ink and paper combination) then the colour management system can predict exactly what colours will be shown if it sends specific pixel values to that device.

    So armed with those two profiles, the colour management system will convert the numbers in the document to the numbers that must be sent to the device in order that the correct colours are displayed.

So what can go wrong :

  1. The colours look different in Photoshop, which is colour managed, to the colours in a different application which is not colour managed.
    This is not actually fault, but it is a commonly raised issue. It is the colour managed version which is correct – the none colour managed application is just sending the document RGB numbers to the output device regardless without any conversion regardless of what they represent in the document and the way they will be displayed on the output device.

  2. The colour settings are changed in Photoshop without understanding what they are for.
    This results in the wrong profiles being used and therefore the wrong conversions and the wrong colours.
    If Photoshop is set to Preserve embedded profiles – it will use the colour profile within the document.

  3. The profile for the output device is incorrect.
    The profile should represent the behaviour of the device exactly. If the wrong profile is used it will not. Equally if the settings on the device are changed in comparison to those settings when the profile was made, then the profile can no longer describe the behaviour of the device. Two examples would be using a printer profile designed for one paper, with a different paper. A second example would be using a monitor profile but changing the colour/contrast etc settings on the monitor.
    The monitor profile is set in the operating system (in Windows 10 that is under Settings>System>Display >Advanced) which leads to a potential further issue. Operating system updates can sometimes load a different monitor profile, or a broken profile, which no longer represents the actual monitor.

 

 

Colour management is simple to use provided the document profile is correct, always save or export with an embedded profile, and the monitor/printer profile is correct. All the math is done in the background.

 

I hope that helps

 

Dave

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 05, 2020

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Look up Color Management – there are a number of online video tutorials on Linkedin Learning.

You can get 30-days free access.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 05, 2020

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You can not expect to print vibrant images as you see them on your screen because screen and printed material are different mediums.

 

If some images comes ok while others are not as you expect then you have problem with color management as already suggested. Ensure that you are working with files using same color space/profile like Adobe RGB and if you must convert them to CMYK then ensure that you are converting to same CMYK profile.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 05, 2020

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There are a few things could be wrong here.

1. Does your laptop have a wide gamut screen (often decribed by marketing as displaying 90+% of Adobe colors)? If so you need to use a calibration device to ensure the monitor profile in your operating system matches your screen. No ifs or buts, a wide gamut monitor must be profiled correctly.

Adjusting photographs on a monitor with the wrong profile is like painting the house through coloured sunglasses. You think you have perfect colours until someone else views them without the same glasses.

2. You don't say what color profile you used for your document. In itself that does not matter as Photoshop can work with a variety of color spaces , but if you are sending documents on to be printed you must embed that document profile with the images. If you are using a local high street printer that ignores the profile, then change printers, but you may get away with converting the documents to sRGB profile (but again embed the profile) and then getting them printed.

3. If you are printing yourself , then you need to set Photoshop to manage the colors and ansure that the correct profile for your printer and paper combination is chosen in the print dialogue.

Forget trying to match with a phone screen - they are not color managed and tend to show colours over-saturated.

 

To add to the above,

I just opened your first jpeg image. It has the ProPhoto color space embedded. That should never leave your computer and will only work with an external printer if they are fully colour managed. Convert your images to sRGB then send them to the printer.

 

A bit of background reading for you :

 

Colour Management simple explanation

Digital images are made up of numbers. In RGB mode, each pixel has a number representing Red, a number representing Green and a Number representing Blue. The problem comes in that different devices can be sent those same numbers but will show different colours. To see a demonstration of this, walk into your local T.V. shop and look at the different coloured pictures – all from the same material.

To ensure the output device is showing the correct colours then a colour management system needs to know two things.

1. What colours do the numbers in the document represent? 
This is the job of the document profile which describes the exact colour to be shown when Red=255 and what colour of white is meant when Red=255, Green = 255 and Blue =255. It also describes how the intermediate values move from 0 through to 255 – known as the tone response curve (or sometimes “gamma”).
Examples of colour spaces are (Adobe RGB1998, sRGB IEC61966-2.1)
With the information from the document profile, the colour management system knows what colour is actually represented by the pixel values in the document.

  1. What colour will be displayed on the printer/monitor if it is sent certain pixel values?
    This is the job of the monitor/printer & paper profile. It should describe exactly what colours the device is capable of showing and, how the device will respond when sent certain values.
    So with a monitor profile that is built to represent the specific monitor (or a printer profile built to represent the specific printer, ink and paper combination) then the colour management system can predict exactly what colours will be shown if it sends specific pixel values to that device.

    So armed with those two profiles, the colour management system will convert the numbers in the document to the numbers that must be sent to the device in order that the correct colours are displayed.

So what can go wrong :

  1. The colours look different in Photoshop, which is colour managed, to the colours in a different application which is not colour managed.
    This is not actually fault, but it is a commonly raised issue. It is the colour managed version which is correct – the none colour managed application is just sending the document RGB numbers to the output device regardless without any conversion regardless of what they represent in the document and the way they will be displayed on the output device.

  2. The colour settings are changed in Photoshop without understanding what they are for.
    This results in the wrong profiles being used and therefore the wrong conversions and the wrong colours.
    If Photoshop is set to Preserve embedded profiles – it will use the colour profile within the document.

  3. The profile for the output device is incorrect.
    The profile should represent the behaviour of the device exactly. If the wrong profile is used it will not. Equally if the settings on the device are changed in comparison to those settings when the profile was made, then the profile can no longer describe the behaviour of the device. Two examples would be using a printer profile designed for one paper, with a different paper. A second example would be using a monitor profile but changing the colour/contrast etc settings on the monitor.
    The monitor profile is set in the operating system (in Windows 10 that is under Settings>System>Display >Advanced) which leads to a potential further issue. Operating system updates can sometimes load a different monitor profile, or a broken profile, which no longer represents the actual monitor.

 

 

Colour management is simple to use provided the document profile is correct, always save or export with an embedded profile, and the monitor/printer profile is correct. All the math is done in the background.

 

I hope that helps

 

Dave

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Aug 05, 2020

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To add to the above,

I just opened your first jpeg image. It has the ProPhoto color space embedded. That should never leave your computer and will only work with an external printer if they are fully colour managed. Convert your images to sRGB then send them to the printer.

 

Dave

 

Dave

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 06, 2020

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I hope that Dave's thorough explanation will help you get to the bottom of this issue.

You may also like to do a nozzle test on the printer to see if its missing one ink pattern perhaps.

If you have a green tint and lack of saturation, that can be an issue caused by misfiring magenta nozzles.

 

If its an Epson and you use Epson paper, then you may get a decent result by selecting 'printer manages color' and selecting the media by name in the printer driver software options. 

 

AND here is some reading on ICC profiles and how they work for you to provide accurate colour through the digital workflow: https://www.colourmanagement.net/advice/about-icc-colour-profiles/

 

I hope this helps

if so, please "like" my reply

thanks

neil barstow, colourmanagement.net :: adobe forum volunteer

[please do not use the reply button on a message within the thread, only use the blue reply button at the top of the page, this maintains the original thread title and chronological order of posts]

 

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