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Product Photography... Done in Photoshop or Not?

New Here ,
Nov 20, 2020

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Hello community,

 

A little about me, 

 

My wife started shooting portrait photography and I have been doing the editing. It will be our first year in January. We have learned so much since then from our education investements, however one thing still eludes me when it comes to product photography...(I am curious as friends want me to shoot/edit their Amazon products.)

If you look at the samples below, they both use a different way of editing. One is more "real" than the other. 

The lipstick sample is very edited and I see this a lot in advertisements. Is this type of editing done exlusively in Photoshop? I can't find any tutorials regarding this type of editing for products. The tutorials I have seen have been for products shot with minor cleanups including some gradients on the lid. 

 

To sum it up more clear, 

 

1. Is the lipstick sample photo and other advertisements done completely from a Photoshop or is it a real product shot in studio and over edited?

2. Does anyone know of any tutorials regarding this type of editing? I can't find any. 

 

Thank you,

 

 

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Product Photography... Done in Photoshop or Not?

New Here ,
Nov 20, 2020

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Hello community,

 

A little about me, 

 

My wife started shooting portrait photography and I have been doing the editing. It will be our first year in January. We have learned so much since then from our education investements, however one thing still eludes me when it comes to product photography...(I am curious as friends want me to shoot/edit their Amazon products.)

If you look at the samples below, they both use a different way of editing. One is more "real" than the other. 

The lipstick sample is very edited and I see this a lot in advertisements. Is this type of editing done exlusively in Photoshop? I can't find any tutorials regarding this type of editing for products. The tutorials I have seen have been for products shot with minor cleanups including some gradients on the lid. 

 

To sum it up more clear, 

 

1. Is the lipstick sample photo and other advertisements done completely from a Photoshop or is it a real product shot in studio and over edited?

2. Does anyone know of any tutorials regarding this type of editing? I can't find any. 

 

Thank you,

 

 

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Nov 20, 2020 0
Most Valuable Participant ,
Nov 20, 2020

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The lipstick sample is a fake image and while you can do it in Photoshop, 3D software like Dimension, Iclone or Blender do a much better workflow

 

the cleanser could be real or fake... its very bland either way

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Nov 20, 2020 0
New Here ,
Nov 21, 2020

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Thank you very much Ussnorway for the reply and help!

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Nov 21, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 21, 2020

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Lipstick image is vector, so likely was done in Illustrator, using gradient mesh to illustrator lipsticks.

Screen Shot 2020-11-21 at 6.01.35 PM.png

 

The other image was shot with this camera then likely retouched

Screen Shot 2020-11-21 at 6.05.16 PM.png

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Nov 21, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 21, 2020

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Product photography is done with lighting. Several studio flash units and a range of soft boxes of different shapes and sizes. Very often backlit backgrounds to remove shadows. Most of what you see is done by highly skilled photographers with tons of experience.

 

Yes, the lipstick is vector, but the other one is a real photograph. It was probably shot just like that, with minimal touch-up in Photoshop. People often think that looks "unrealistic" because they can't do it themselves, so they think "it must be Photoshop". But it's not. It's just good photographers.

 

Had to get that off my chest...

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Nov 21, 2020 3
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 21, 2020

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Good reminder, @D Fosse !

~ Jane

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Nov 21, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 22, 2020

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Here's a very simple DIY backlighting setup. This completely eliminates any need for masking. The principal light here is a large overhead softbox:

backlight_2.jpg

 

I have to be careful what I post for copyright reasons, but these crops should be safe. All these images come straight out of Lightroom, no Photoshop whatsoever. No masking:

example_02.jpg

example_01.jpg

 

Softboxes are incredibly flexible lighting. Not only smooth light and very soft, subtle shadows, but you can also use them for light/dark effects to emphasize shape:

example_03.jpg

example_04.jpg

 

Studio flash units and softboxes cost a little money. But if you plan to do this a lot, it's a very good investment that will cut your hours down to fractions of what you would spend in Photoshop. And there are varieties of this, like the light tent to simulate "white-out" lighting, very effective in some cases.

 

When you look at those ads and wonder how to do it, this is how. It's not Photoshop.

flash_01.png

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Nov 22, 2020 2
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 22, 2020

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For a little background information; I have owned a commercial photography studio for thirty-plus years.

There is no simple answer to your question. Yes, it does appear that much of your sample advertisement is generated in post-production, but the level of manipulation is based greatly on the project and client. Some projects have minimal manipulation and others take days.

warmly/j

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Nov 22, 2020 0