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PS saves two formats at the same time?

Community Beginner ,
Oct 09, 2020

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I use photoshop cc recently updated For the first time today I have found that there are 2 types of file visibilty formats when saving a tif file   1)  a traditional icon of the image as saved  on a second version of the same image(both flattened) the color detail is missing

this is a new phenoma  Does anyonw have an answer to this

 

thnx

Roger



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PS saves two formats at the same time?

Community Beginner ,
Oct 09, 2020

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I use photoshop cc recently updated For the first time today I have found that there are 2 types of file visibilty formats when saving a tif file   1)  a traditional icon of the image as saved  on a second version of the same image(both flattened) the color detail is missing

this is a new phenoma  Does anyonw have an answer to this

 

thnx

Roger



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[ private informations removed by moderator for security reasons ]

 

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Oct 09, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 10, 2020

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IMO there is rarely a need to save a PSD file as a TIFF – TIFFs file are very large, the quality improvement over JPGs is imperceptible, and compared with an uncompressed JPGs and they have limited use. Unlike TIFFs, JPGs can be used in all applications, so distribution to others works in all applications, the format will be accepted by photo bureaux, and they can be used in websites. There are features of TIFF that might be used by some, but not for the general user.

Keep images as native PSD files (in RGB color mode) for placing in some applications, such as InDesign.

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Oct 10, 2020 0
New Here ,
Oct 10, 2020

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This also happens to me. I also get rid of this. Plz, can anyone help us?

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Oct 10, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 10, 2020

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This is as it should be. The reason is the limitations in the jpeg file format specification.

 

You have saved a layered file as jpeg - but the jpeg specification does not support layers. So it has to be a copy.

 

The original layered file remains as the jpeg copy is saved. The jpeg cannot replace the tiff because it cannot contain all the properties.

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Oct 10, 2020 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 10, 2020

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Dag – do you use TIFFs for your high quality work?

Derek

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Oct 10, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 10, 2020

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Personally I keep all my masters PSD. For use in Adobe applications exclusively, sticking to native formats is probably the safest choice. But TIFF should work equally well, AFAIK it supports everything (except it may be a little limited in InDesign).

 

But jpeg is a different kind of animal. It's for a whole other purpose, and it basically doesn't support anything. The minute you start doing something to an image in Photoshop, it's outside the jpeg file format specification. Not to mention the compression. So it's completely out of the question as a working format.

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Oct 10, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 10, 2020

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Well there you have it OP, an answer to your original question and a range of views / issues on file formats.

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Oct 10, 2020 0