Remove green reflection around the subject

Community Beginner ,
Nov 25, 2020

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How can I remove the green reflection that is around the model.

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Remove green reflection around the subject

Community Beginner ,
Nov 25, 2020

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How can I remove the green reflection that is around the model.

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Nov 25, 2020 0
LEGEND ,
Nov 25, 2020

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Could you please post screenshots with the pertinent Panels (Toolbar, Layers, Channels, Options Bar, …) visible? 

 

Have you tried Decontaminating in the »Select and Mask«-workspace?

If that does not work out you can try using a Hue/Saturation Layer with an appropriate Layer Mask and, if necessary, do manual touch-up on a new Layer or duplicate.  

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Nov 25, 2020 0
Community Beginner ,
Nov 25, 2020

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Screen Shot 2020-11-25 at 1.12.56 PM.png

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Nov 25, 2020 2
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 25, 2020

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Double click on your layer mask and select "Decontaminate Colors" at the bottom. Use the slider to adjust.

Kevin Stohlmeyer Adobe Community Professional/Adobe Certified Instructor

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Nov 25, 2020 1
LEGEND ,
Nov 25, 2020

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I think you should restructure your file’s Layers. 

 

Putting the background behind the clipped photograph is not technically necessary but I think it helps with more intuitivelly processing the stack of layers. 

 

As per @davescm  ’s advice you can then Clipping Mask a Color-Layer to the Layer. 

If some edges seem too bright additional touch-up on another Clipping Masked Layer could prove useful. 

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Nov 25, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 25, 2020

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Decontaminate colours is destructive and often does not work well.

An alternative is to clip a new layer set to blend mode colour to the image layer. (Add your new layer above the image layer and Alt-click on the border between the new layer and the image layer) Then with a soft brush, Alt -click to pick up colour from the skin and paint around the green edges. Alt click as you go round to match the colour to the nearby skin/clothing. This will only change the colour not the luminosity.

 

Dave

 

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Nov 25, 2020 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 25, 2020

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Decontaminate colors is NON destructive. It places the results on a new layer.

Kevin Stohlmeyer Adobe Community Professional/Adobe Certified Instructor

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Nov 25, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 25, 2020

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But not separate to the masked layer. So it depends how we term non destructive. Using a separate layer to decontaminate retains the masked layer, and allows the output of Select and Mask to be just a mask.

 

Dave

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Nov 25, 2020 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 30, 2020

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Non destructive means the original layer remains untouched. Not much depending.

Kevin Stohlmeyer Adobe Community Professional/Adobe Certified Instructor

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Nov 30, 2020 0
LEGEND ,
Nov 30, 2020

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»Non destructive means the original layer remains untouched.«

By that definition duplicating a Layer and applying Curves would be non-destructive. 

But it would seem worse that using a Curves Layer – because that would not only leave the original Layer untouched but also maintain editability of the chosen settings. 

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Nov 30, 2020 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 30, 2020

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You are correct. It may not be the most efficient method, but that is still considered non-destructive.

Kevin Stohlmeyer Adobe Community Professional/Adobe Certified Instructor

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Nov 30, 2020 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 30, 2020

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Personally I don't like the term "non-destructive". Nothing is really destructive as long as the original is still there.

 

I prefer "re-editable". That's the important aspect of it.

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Nov 30, 2020 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 30, 2020

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When pixels are changed — as they are with decontaminate — is that not the definition of destructive editing? 

~ Jane

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Nov 30, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 30, 2020

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But again - you can choose to have it applied to a new layer and mask. The original remains untouched.

I didn't make up the term of non-destructive. Just wanted to be clear to the OP what was and was not ND. Screen Shot 2020-11-30 at 2.55.21 PM.png

Kevin Stohlmeyer Adobe Community Professional/Adobe Certified Instructor

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Nov 30, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 30, 2020

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Sorry, but while I accept that the original layer is still available to work from again, that masked output layer has had its pixels changed permanently. Try running decontaminate to a new layer with mask then go and alter the mask slightly by painting to expand a small area. It now looks appalling with non anti-aliased changed pixels around the edge. The only way round is to take the mask onto the original layer (in which case you lose the decontamination), clone part of the original layer (again you lose the decontamination) or start again and remask the original layer. You may call it something else, I will continue to call it destructive. I would much prefer if PS had put the decontamination onto a separate color blended layer.

 

Dave

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Nov 30, 2020 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 30, 2020

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"you can choose to have it applied to a new layer and mask. The original remains untouched."

 

If that were really the definition of non-destructive, then wouldn't all editing be non-destructive as long as you made a copy of the original layer first so you can work from it again? That's how we used to have to work in the old days before the Photoshop team gave us Adjustment Layers, Smart Objects, Filters on SOs, etc.

 

Jane

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Nov 30, 2020 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 01, 2020

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I'm not going to debate the merits of what is defined as "Destructive" or "Non Destructive".

Here is the technical definition of the term:

Non-destructive editing is making edits to a photo that happens on the image in a separate layer so both the edited image and original image are saved.

Yes back in the day we duped layers to do this and there are better methods to acheive. But both are considered non-destructive.

Kevin Stohlmeyer Adobe Community Professional/Adobe Certified Instructor

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Dec 01, 2020 1
Enthusiast ,
Nov 30, 2020

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Hue-Saturation layer. Lower the saturation of yellow and green.

Screenshot 2020-11-30 092627.jpg

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Nov 30, 2020 3
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 30, 2020

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Comp.jpg

mask.jpg

You may consider using Lab Color as an alternative. In the sample above:

1. Change the image to Lab Color Mode and add a duplicate layer

2. Go to Channels, choose the  a  channel where green is represented by a dark value and magenta is shown as a light value.

3. Create an Alpha channel from the  a  channel and paint as shown. Use Curves and a brush to increase the contrast and paint out areas where the green tone in the image is not to be affected.  Then invert the result. It is the mask. 

4. Return to Levels and add the mask to the top image

5. Choose Curves and in the  a  channel bisect the grid horizonally. Move to the Lightness channel and, after moving from the mask to the image prt of the layer, with the hair as a reference, darken the shadow end of the curve. (I may have overdone the darkening. See this in larger size.  Easy correction,)

6. Return to RGB Mode 

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Nov 30, 2020 4
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 30, 2020

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Nice job Norman 🙂

Dave

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Nov 30, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 30, 2020

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If your Creative Cloud subscription includes After Effects, you can import the image into an After Effects project to apply Keylight to the original image, assuming that you still have it with the green background.  Then apply Advanced Spill Suppressor to remove the green spill from your image.

 

If the green from the original image has been deleted, you can still apply Advanced Spill Suppressor.

 

Keylight can be found under Effects > Keying > Keylight (1.2).

 

Advanced Spill Suppressor can be found under Effects > Keying >Advancd Spill Suppressor.

 

To return to Photoshop, choose Composition > Save Frame As > Photoshop Layers...  

 

It's usually a good idea to save the After Effects project in case you need to return for further adjustments, but you don't need to if you're happy with the results when you're back in Photoshop.

 

Screen Shot 2020-11-30 at 6.17.14 PM.png

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