The ProPhoto cyan shadow banding bug

Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 23, 2018

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Since Noel is back with us, I thought this header might catch his attention. He was the one who first reported it six or seven years ago.

The reason I'm bringing this up now, is that someone in the Lightroom forum had this problem just yesterday (he was sending ProPhoto files to Photoshop and couldn't understand the cyan cast in his dark grays). There's no doubt it's the same issue.

This made me dig up my old ProPhoto test gradient file. I don't use ProPhoto all that much, so I haven't really looked for it in a while. To recap, this is an example of what it could look like (this is an old screenshot that I've kept). Open and view against a darkish background:

test-PP_screenshot.png

But when I opened the test gradient now, there was no trace of it, zero. The gradient is smooth as silk. That surprised me, because while the effect can vary, it always seemed to be there in some form.

Technically, this is an inaccuracy in the conversion from ProPhoto into the monitor profile. This conversion is performed by OpenGL in the GPU when you have the PS preference set to Normal and Advanced modes. In Basic mode it's shifted back to the CPU, which is more accurate so the problem disappears. And you only see it in ProPhoto files because ProPhoto is very compressed in the shadow values compared to other color spaces. The stratospheric gamut has a price, and that's it. With this compression, inaccuracies get amplified.

So what has changed on my system over the last 12 to 24 months? Not much. I still use Eizo Colornavigator as I did then, still producing similar matrix monitor profiles. But one thing has changed - going from GeForce to Quadro, and with that, 10 bits per ch output.

So Noel, if you're reading this - I understand you have Quadro GPU too, and running displays at 10 bit. Do you still see it?

Anyone else?

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LEGEND ,
Oct 27, 2018

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Hi, yeah, thanks, I've tried a bunch of different monitor profiles.  The error seems to follow the image profile.  And as we've learned here, changes nature occasionally depending on other as of yet unknown factors.  It's really encouraging that on some of your systems it's working AOK.

A workaround is clear - if the on-screen color accuracy with ProPhoto RGB is of high importance, use Basic GPU mode.

Otherwise, with virtually every other profile the GPU Normal and Advanced modes (i.e., color-management by Adobe GPU software) are fine.  I personally don't use the ProPhoto RGB profile much, though I have occasionally set it as the conversion target for Camera Raw, then done software conversions once the image is opened into Photoshop and processed a bit.  This can be helpful if subject material with brilliant bright reds (e.g., Christmas flowers) are photographed.

-Noel

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 27, 2018

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Yeah, that's how I use ProPhoto too. Sometimes it's necessary to open into ProPhoto if gamut clipping can't be easily controlled in ACR/Lightroom. Then I do more elaborate and targeted gamut remapping in Photoshop, but I prefer to get it into Adobe RGB as quickly as possible, without clipping.

Very often these high-saturation areas coming out of ACR are processing artifacts, not "realistic" colors. The image will usually improve by "taming" them.

Discussions about ProPhoto are often reduced to "yes, but there are printable colors outside Adobe RGB".  Yes there are, a very marginal set of neon-bright colors with little practical significance. My reply is, as always, that good color is about relationships, not max total saturation.

The main thing is to avoid areas of gamut clipping in the end result. Nothing can kill an image as effectively as that. For that, ProPhoto has its place as a useful tool, to be used when needed. But it won't solve all color problems.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 27, 2018

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Discussions about ProPhoto are often reduced to "yes, but there are printable colors outside Adobe RGB".  Yes there are, a very marginal set of neon-bright colors with little practical significance. My reply is, as always, that good color is about relationships, not max total saturation.

But there seems to be an implication that ProPhoto could create an output problem with a "typical" in-gamut image, which could be avoided by defaulting to a smaller space. I'm not seeing that. Any colors I check with the same appearance in the two RGB spaces, which are also in the destination CMYK gamut, convert to matching destination CMYK output numbers.

It's fair enough to argue that ProPhoto has no advantage in that case, but if there's a downside we should see a meaningful variance in the output numbers.

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LEGEND ,
Oct 27, 2018

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By the way, I did a little more research on the ProPhoto RGB profile.  According to this page, there's actually a linear section of the tone curves very close to black:

ProPhoto RGB color space - Wikipedia

The cutoff for the linear section is 1/512, or 0.001953125.  The designers clearly envisioned it being used with high bit depth data.

No particular reason for mentioning this, though it's food for thought...  If a particular color-management implementation forgets to account for that section (or approximates it) it would introduce inaccuracies near black...

-Noel

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 27, 2018

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it would introduce inaccuracies near black

Shouldn't that show up in the print output numbers? I'm not seeing any problems in my #45 test. With six color samples in the shadow end. Bottom is ProPhoto, top is the ProPhoto file converted to Adobe RGB, the info panel is showing GRACol CMYK:

Screen Shot 1.png

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 27, 2018

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You're not seeing it on screen either, so no reason to assume it automatically shows up in print output.

The whole thing seems unpredictable, that's why it's so puzzling. Clearly there is some marginal "butterfly effect" that goes this way or that depending on some unknown initial circumstances.

Maybe we need to dive into chaos theory to explain it...

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 27, 2018

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You're not seeing it on screen either, so no reason to assume it automatically shows up in print output.

Right, I made the color conversion from ProPhoto to AdobeRGB and the color appearance didn't change, that is expected and predictable behavior. After the conversion the two files had the same appearance with different RGB values, but they both convert to the same output numbers, which is also expected behavior. That's why I don't think there is any downside in using ProPhoto.

But then I'm not seeing your problem on screen or in color conversions with either GPU or CPU. If you are seeing the problem in the display and getting different output conversions, that would be a real problem.

If you or Noel want to check, here are the ProPhoto and AdobeRGB ramps that are converting to the same CMYK numbers for me. There are 6 color samples in the info panel. The conversion to GRACol was relative colorimetric with BPC turned on, but I get a match with any CMYK profile.

Dropbox - ProPhototo-AdobeRGB.zip

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 27, 2018

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it is happening in one profile conversion, from ProPhoto to monitor, for some people. Not you and I, but many others. It could in principle happen in other conversions, like ProPhoto to print. It's just another profile conversion.

However, so far we have only seen it when that conversion is performed by the GPU, not when it's performed by the CPU. So that's why we've only seen it happening on screen.

Now here's the interesting part: We thought it was the OpenGL code that did this. But it's also happening on new Macs, running Mojave. And Mojave doesn't use OpenGL - it uses the new Metal framework. Figure that one out - I can't...

There's no discernible pattern to this. No common factor re monitor profiles, GPUs or drivers. The only common factor evident so far is ProPhoto.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 28, 2018

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It could in principle happen in other conversions, like ProPhoto to print. It's just another profile conversion.

I think that would be more of a problem than the display anomaly. We are all using different monitor profiles, so the conversion of ProPhoto to Rob's Monitor profile would likely be different than the conversion from ProPhoto to Noel's Monitor profile. The conversion from ProPhoto to GRACol should produce the same numbers on any machine because the source and destination is always the same.

Since Noel is seeing it maybe he could check the conversions of my two RGB files to CMYK?

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LEGEND ,
Oct 27, 2018

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Hey Dag, I had an idea that's a bit out there...  Here's my sniffer-out.txt file.  Does it differ from yours in any important ways?

Number of Launches: 331

stdout:

# Photoshop Version: 20180920.r.24 2018/09/20: 1193433

Tester="Photoshop"

snifferStart="2018-10-28_00:35:54"

AIFCoreInitialized=1

# 00000_2018/10/28_00:35:54.313(+00.000)[f10] BEGIN DoRunAIFOGLInitialize

AIFOGLInitialized=1

# 00001_2018/10/28_00:35:54.313(+00.000)[f10] END DoRunAIFOGLInitialize, duration=8.88295e-06

# 00002_2018/10/28_00:35:54.313(+00.000)[f10] BEGIN DoRunAnyGLGPU

OGLContextCreated=1

# 00003_2018/10/28_00:35:54.881(+00.568)[f10] END DoRunAnyGLGPU, duration=0.568035

# 00004_2018/10/28_00:35:54.881(+00.000)[f10] BEGIN DoRunEnumerateGLGPUs

# 00005_2018/10/28_00:35:54.933(+00.052)[f10]  wmiNumDevices=1

# 00006_2018/10/28_00:35:54.934(+00.000)[f10]  adapter[0]{ VendorID=4318 DeviceId=7216 SubSysId=296947934 Revision=161 DedicatedVideoMemory=5160439808 DedicatedSystemMemory=0 SharedSystemMemory=25768527872 Description=NVIDIA Quadro P2000}

# 00007_2018/10/28_00:35:54.934(+00.000)[f10]  output[0]{ DesktopCoordinates={ L=0 T=0 R=2560 B=1600 W=2560 H=1600 } AttachedToDesktop=1 Rotation=1 Monitor=0000000000010001 DeviceName=\\\\.\\DISPLAY1

# 00008_2018/10/28_00:35:54.934(+00.000)[f10]  output[1]{ DesktopCoordinates={ L=-1200 T=0 R=0 B=1600 W=1200 H=1600 } AttachedToDesktop=1 Rotation=2 Monitor=0000000000010003 DeviceName=\\\\.\\DISPLAY2

# 00009_2018/10/28_00:35:54.934(+00.000)[f10]  output[2]{ DesktopCoordinates={ L=2560 T=0 R=3760 B=1600 W=1200 H=1600 } AttachedToDesktop=1 Rotation=2 Monitor=0000000000010005 DeviceName=\\\\.\\DISPLAY3

# 00010_2018/10/28_00:35:54.934(+00.000)[f10]  adapter[0] displays: 3

# 00011_2018/10/28_00:35:54.934(+00.000)[f10]  adapter[1]{ VendorID=5140 DeviceId=140 SubSysId=0 Revision=0 DedicatedVideoMemory=0 DedicatedSystemMemory=0 SharedSystemMemory=268435456 Description=Microsoft Basic Render Driver}

# 00012_2018/10/28_00:35:54.934(+00.000)[f10]  dxgiNumDevices=1

# 00013_2018/10/28_00:35:54.934(+00.000)[f10]  aifNumDevices=1

# 00014_2018/10/28_00:35:54.934(+00.000)[f10]  aifDeviceIndex=0

# 00015_2018/10/28_00:35:54.935(+00.000)[f10]  creating ContextOffscreen for { DeviceName=\\\\.\\DISPLAY1 DeviceString=NVIDIA Quadro P2000 DisplayID=7216}

# 00016_2018/10/28_00:35:54.939(+00.005)[f10]  aifDevice[0]={ DeviceName=\\\\.\\DISPLAY1 DeviceString=NVIDIA Quadro P2000 DisplayID=7216}

# 00017_2018/10/28_00:35:54.939(+00.000)[f10]  aifNumContexts=1

NumGLGPUs=1

# 00018_2018/10/28_00:35:54.940(+00.000)[f10] END DoRunEnumerateGLGPUs, duration=0.0580164

glgpu[0].GLVersion="4.1"

# 00019_2018/10/28_00:35:54.940(+00.000)[f10] fAdapterDesc.VendorId=4318

# 00020_2018/10/28_00:35:54.940(+00.000)[f10] Looks like a discrete GPU

glgpu[0].IsIntegratedGLGPU=0

# 00021_2018/10/28_00:35:54.954(+00.014)[f10] DXGI RAM=5160439808=4921MB

# 00022_2018/10/28_00:35:54.954(+00.000)[f10] wmiVRAM=5120 dxgiVRAM=4921

glgpu[0].GLMemoryMB=5120

glgpu[0].GLName="NVIDIA Quadro P2000"

glgpu[0].GLVendor="NVIDIA Corporation"

glgpu[0].GLVendorID=4318

glgpu[0].GLDriverVersion="24.21.14.1181"

glgpu[0].GLRectTextureSize=32768

glgpu[0].GLRenderer="Quadro P2000/PCIe/SSE2"

glgpu[0].GLRendererID=7216

glgpu[0].HasGLNPOTSupport=1

glgpu[0].GLDriver="nvd3dumx.dll,nvwgf2umx.dll,nvwgf2umx.dll,nvd3dum,nvwgf2um,nvwgf2um"

glgpu[0].GLDriverDate="20181016000000.000000-000"

glgpu[0].CanCompileProgramGLSL=1

glgpu[0].GLFrameBufferOK=1

gputag.GL_SHADING_LANGUAGE_VERSION=35724

glgpu[0].glGetString[GL_SHADING_LANGUAGE_VERSION]="4.60 NVIDIA"

gputag.GL_FRAGMENT_PROGRAM_ARB=34820

gputag.GL_MAX_PROGRAM_INSTRUCTIONS_ARB=34977

glgpu[0].glGetProgramivARB[GL_FRAGMENT_PROGRAM_ARB][GL_MAX_PROGRAM_INSTRUCTIONS_ARB]=[65536]

gputag.GL_MAX_TEXTURE_UNITS=34018

glgpu[0].glGetIntegerv[GL_MAX_TEXTURE_UNITS]=[4]

gputag.GL_MAX_COMBINED_TEXTURE_IMAGE_UNITS=35661

glgpu[0].glGetIntegerv[GL_MAX_COMBINED_TEXTURE_IMAGE_UNITS]=[192]

gputag.GL_MAX_VERTEX_TEXTURE_IMAGE_UNITS=35660

glgpu[0].glGetIntegerv[GL_MAX_VERTEX_TEXTURE_IMAGE_UNITS]=[32]

gputag.GL_MAX_TEXTURE_IMAGE_UNITS=34930

glgpu[0].glGetIntegerv[GL_MAX_TEXTURE_IMAGE_UNITS]=[32]

gputag.GL_MAX_DRAW_BUFFERS=34852

glgpu[0].glGetIntegerv[GL_MAX_DRAW_BUFFERS]=[8]

gputag.GL_MAX_VERTEX_UNIFORM_COMPONENTS=35658

glgpu[0].glGetIntegerv[GL_MAX_VERTEX_UNIFORM_COMPONENTS]=[4096]

gputag.GL_MAX_FRAGMENT_UNIFORM_COMPONENTS=35657

glgpu[0].glGetIntegerv[GL_MAX_FRAGMENT_UNIFORM_COMPONENTS]=[4096]

gputag.GL_MAX_VARYING_FLOATS=35659

glgpu[0].glGetIntegerv[GL_MAX_VARYING_FLOATS]=[124]

gputag.GL_MAX_VERTEX_ATTRIBS=34921

glgpu[0].glGetIntegerv[GL_MAX_VERTEX_ATTRIBS]=[16]

gputag.AIF::OGL::GL_ARB_VERTEX_PROGRAM=69

glgpu[0].extension[AIF::OGL::GL_ARB_VERTEX_PROGRAM]=1

gputag.AIF::OGL::GL_ARB_FRAGMENT_PROGRAM=27

glgpu[0].extension[AIF::OGL::GL_ARB_FRAGMENT_PROGRAM]=1

gputag.AIF::OGL::GL_ARB_VERTEX_SHADER=70

glgpu[0].extension[AIF::OGL::GL_ARB_VERTEX_SHADER]=1

gputag.AIF::OGL::GL_ARB_FRAGMENT_SHADER=28

glgpu[0].extension[AIF::OGL::GL_ARB_FRAGMENT_SHADER]=1

gputag.AIF::OGL::GL_EXT_FRAMEBUFFER_OBJECT=81

glgpu[0].extension[AIF::OGL::GL_EXT_FRAMEBUFFER_OBJECT]=1

gputag.AIF::OGL::GL_ARB_TEXTURE_RECTANGLE=58

glgpu[0].extension[AIF::OGL::GL_ARB_TEXTURE_RECTANGLE]=1

gputag.AIF::OGL::GL_ARB_TEXTURE_FLOAT=53

glgpu[0].extension[AIF::OGL::GL_ARB_TEXTURE_FLOAT]=1

gputag.AIF::OGL::GL_ARB_OCCLUSION_QUERY=37

glgpu[0].extension[AIF::OGL::GL_ARB_OCCLUSION_QUERY]=1

gputag.AIF::OGL::GL_ARB_VERTEX_BUFFER_OBJECT=68

glgpu[0].extension[AIF::OGL::GL_ARB_VERTEX_BUFFER_OBJECT]=1

gputag.AIF::OGL::GL_ARB_SHADER_TEXTURE_LOD=47

glgpu[0].extension[AIF::OGL::GL_ARB_SHADER_TEXTURE_LOD]=1

# 00023_2018/10/28_00:35:54.963(+00.009)[f10] BEGIN DoRunAIFOCLInitialize

# 00024_2018/10/28_00:35:55.006(+00.043)[f10]  DoRunAIFOCLInitialize: AIF::OCL::Library::initialize();

# 00025_2018/10/28_00:35:55.007(+00.001)[f10] END DoRunAIFOCLInitialize, duration=0.0437542

# 00026_2018/10/28_00:35:55.007(+00.000)[f10] BEGIN DoRunEnumerateCLGPUs

NumCLGPUs=1

# 00027_2018/10/28_00:35:55.007(+00.000)[f10] END DoRunEnumerateCLGPUs, duration=2.30977e-05

clgpu[0].CLPlatformVersion="1.2"

clgpu[0].CLDeviceVersion="1.2 CUDA"

clgpu[0].IsIntegratedCLGPU=0

clgpu[0].CLMemoryMB=5120

clgpu[0].CLName="Quadro P2000"

clgpu[0].CLVendor="NVIDIA Corporation"

clgpu[0].CLVendorID=4318

clgpu[0].CLDriverVersion="411.81"

clgpu[0].CUDASupported=1

clgpu[0].CUDAVersion="10.0.181"

# 00028_2018/10/28_00:35:55.007(+00.000)[f10] BEGIN GPUSnifferTester::DoRunCLBandwidth

# 00029_2018/10/28_00:35:55.007(+00.000)[f10]  BEGIN GPUImplHardware::DoGetCLBandwidth

# 00030_2018/10/28_00:35:55.007(+00.000)[f10]   GPUImplHardware::DoGetCLBandwidth: AIF::OCL::Context context(properties, *iDev);

# 00031_2018/10/28_00:35:55.343(+00.336)[f10]   GPUImplHardware::DoGetCLBandwidth: AIF::OCL::CommandQueue cq(context, *iDev, false, true);

# 00032_2018/10/28_00:35:55.343(+00.000)[f10]   BEGIN GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL

# 00033_2018/10/28_00:35:55.343(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: clCreateBuffer d_idata nbytes=16777216

# 00034_2018/10/28_00:35:55.343(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: clCreateBuffer d_odata nbytes=16777216

# 00035_2018/10/28_00:35:55.343(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: clFinish

# 00036_2018/10/28_00:35:55.343(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: copy 100 iterations

# 00037_2018/10/28_00:35:55.343(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: 0 of 100, totalSeconds=0

# 00038_2018/10/28_00:35:55.352(+00.009)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::timeBandwidthCL: totalSeconds=0.00287843

# 00039_2018/10/28_00:35:55.352(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: seconds=0.00287843

# 00040_2018/10/28_00:35:55.352(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: totalSeconds=0.00287843, BW=1.16572e+11, maxBW=1.16572e+11

# 00041_2018/10/28_00:35:55.352(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: 10 of 100, totalSeconds=0.00287843

# 00042_2018/10/28_00:35:55.355(+00.003)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::timeBandwidthCL: totalSeconds=0.00287027

# 00043_2018/10/28_00:35:55.355(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: seconds=0.00287027

# 00044_2018/10/28_00:35:55.355(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: totalSeconds=0.0057487, BW=1.16903e+11, maxBW=1.16903e+11

# 00045_2018/10/28_00:35:55.355(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: 20 of 100, totalSeconds=0.0057487

# 00046_2018/10/28_00:35:55.359(+00.003)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::timeBandwidthCL: totalSeconds=0.00287946

# 00047_2018/10/28_00:35:55.359(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: seconds=0.00287946

# 00048_2018/10/28_00:35:55.359(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: totalSeconds=0.00862816, BW=1.1653e+11, maxBW=1.16903e+11

# 00049_2018/10/28_00:35:55.359(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: 30 of 100, totalSeconds=0.00862816

# 00050_2018/10/28_00:35:55.362(+00.003)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::timeBandwidthCL: totalSeconds=0.00286925

# 00051_2018/10/28_00:35:55.362(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: seconds=0.00286925

# 00052_2018/10/28_00:35:55.362(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: totalSeconds=0.0114974, BW=1.16945e+11, maxBW=1.16945e+11

# 00053_2018/10/28_00:35:55.362(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: 40 of 100, totalSeconds=0.0114974

# 00054_2018/10/28_00:35:55.366(+00.003)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::timeBandwidthCL: totalSeconds=0.0028785

# 00055_2018/10/28_00:35:55.366(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: seconds=0.0028785

# 00056_2018/10/28_00:35:55.366(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: totalSeconds=0.0143759, BW=1.16569e+11, maxBW=1.16945e+11

# 00057_2018/10/28_00:35:55.366(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: 50 of 100, totalSeconds=0.0143759

# 00058_2018/10/28_00:35:55.369(+00.003)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::timeBandwidthCL: totalSeconds=0.00287437

# 00059_2018/10/28_00:35:55.369(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: seconds=0.00287437

# 00060_2018/10/28_00:35:55.369(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: totalSeconds=0.0172503, BW=1.16737e+11, maxBW=1.16945e+11

# 00061_2018/10/28_00:35:55.369(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: 60 of 100, totalSeconds=0.0172503

# 00062_2018/10/28_00:35:55.372(+00.003)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::timeBandwidthCL: totalSeconds=0.00286925

# 00063_2018/10/28_00:35:55.372(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: seconds=0.00286925

# 00064_2018/10/28_00:35:55.372(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: totalSeconds=0.0201195, BW=1.16945e+11, maxBW=1.16945e+11

# 00065_2018/10/28_00:35:55.372(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: 70 of 100, totalSeconds=0.0201195

# 00066_2018/10/28_00:35:55.376(+00.003)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::timeBandwidthCL: totalSeconds=0.00287949

# 00067_2018/10/28_00:35:55.376(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: seconds=0.00287949

# 00068_2018/10/28_00:35:55.376(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: totalSeconds=0.022999, BW=1.16529e+11, maxBW=1.16945e+11

# 00069_2018/10/28_00:35:55.376(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: 80 of 100, totalSeconds=0.022999

# 00070_2018/10/28_00:35:55.379(+00.003)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::timeBandwidthCL: totalSeconds=0.00286928

# 00071_2018/10/28_00:35:55.379(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: seconds=0.00286928

# 00072_2018/10/28_00:35:55.379(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: totalSeconds=0.0258683, BW=1.16944e+11, maxBW=1.16945e+11

# 00073_2018/10/28_00:35:55.379(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: 90 of 100, totalSeconds=0.0258683

# 00074_2018/10/28_00:35:55.382(+00.003)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::timeBandwidthCL: totalSeconds=0.00287539

# 00075_2018/10/28_00:35:55.382(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: seconds=0.00287539

# 00076_2018/10/28_00:35:55.383(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: totalSeconds=0.0287437, BW=1.16695e+11, maxBW=1.16945e+11

# 00077_2018/10/28_00:35:55.383(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: clFinish

# 00078_2018/10/28_00:35:55.383(+00.000)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: releasing

# 00079_2018/10/28_00:35:55.384(+00.002)[f10]    GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL: result=1.16945e+11

# 00080_2018/10/28_00:35:55.385(+00.000)[f10]   END GPUImplHardware::checkBandwidthCL, duration=0.0413094

# 00081_2018/10/28_00:35:55.385(+00.000)[f10]   bytesPerSecond=1.16945e+11

# 00082_2018/10/28_00:35:55.385(+00.000)[f10]   GPUImplHardware::DoGetCLBandwidth: result=1.16945e+11

# 00083_2018/10/28_00:35:55.385(+00.000)[f10]  END GPUImplHardware::DoGetCLBandwidth, duration=0.377736

clgpu[0].CLBandwidth=1.16945e+11

# 00084_2018/10/28_00:35:55.385(+00.000)[f10] END GPUSnifferTester::DoRunCLBandwidth, duration=0.377807

# 00085_2018/10/28_00:35:55.385(+00.000)[f10] BEGIN GPUImplHardware::DoGetCLCompute

# 00086_2018/10/28_00:35:55.385(+00.000)[f10]  GPUImplHardware::DoGetCLCompute: AIF::OCL::Context context(properties, *iDev);

# 00087_2018/10/28_00:35:55.723(+00.338)[f10]  GPUImplHardware::DoGetCLCompute: AIF::OCL::CommandQueue cq(context, *iDev, false, true);

# 00088_2018/10/28_00:35:55.723(+00.000)[f10]  BEGIN GPUImplHardware::MeasureCLCompute

# 00089_2018/10/28_00:35:55.771(+00.048)[f10]   GPUImplHardware::MeasureCLCompute: clFinish

# 00090_2018/10/28_00:35:55.772(+00.000)[f10]   GPUImplHardware::MeasureCLCompute: result=0.00846848

# 00091_2018/10/28_00:35:55.772(+00.000)[f10]  END GPUImplHardware::MeasureCLCompute, duration=0.0488671

# 00092_2018/10/28_00:35:55.772(+00.000)[f10]  timeForKernelExecution=944.68

# 00093_2018/10/28_00:35:55.772(+00.000)[f10]  GPUImplHardware::DoGetCLCompute: result=944.68

# 00094_2018/10/28_00:35:55.772(+00.000)[f10] END GPUImplHardware::DoGetCLCompute, duration=0.387433

clgpu[0].CLCompute=944.68

NumNativeGPUs=0

snifferEnd="2018-10-28_00:35:56"

stderr:

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 28, 2018

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So...where do I find this?

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Explorer ,
Feb 15, 2019

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2019 Feb, the problem still exists, the same banding when doing "Edit in Photo" from Lightroom, but in Lightroom, there is no banding. Since Lightroom recommends to use ProPhoto to Handle File when export to an external app, why it's not working in Photoshop when the GPU takes over, I don't want to set it to Basic.

Using Win 10 and Geforce 1080ti

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