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Using HDR display

Aug 04, 2018

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I would like to use an HDR display with photoshop and also premiere in the future. Will the program automaticly set itself to output 10 bit color to the display or will I have to enable some settings?

also I plan on getting an AMD Firepro W9100 graphics card and I'm unsure weather it supports HDR in photoshop.

on the AMD fourum someone said it did not support 10 bit color in windows but that it supports app speciffic HDR, and on a Youtube video It was mentioned as supporting HDR so I'm really confused.

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Using HDR display

Aug 04, 2018

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I would like to use an HDR display with photoshop and also premiere in the future. Will the program automaticly set itself to output 10 bit color to the display or will I have to enable some settings?

also I plan on getting an AMD Firepro W9100 graphics card and I'm unsure weather it supports HDR in photoshop.

on the AMD fourum someone said it did not support 10 bit color in windows but that it supports app speciffic HDR, and on a Youtube video It was mentioned as supporting HDR so I'm really confused.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 04, 2018

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Hi

To use 10 bit then you need a card that supports it (I believe the Nvidia Quadro's do, I am not sure about the AMD FirePro) and a monitor that also supports it. Then you should bve able to check it in Preferences >Performance Advanced.

Note : If you are getting a wide gamut display then good colour management is essential> That means getting a calibration device that will build a profile to tell Photoshop and other colour managed applications the exact way your monitor will display colour.


https://forums.adobe.com/people/D%20Fosse  uses a 10 bit display, I have copied him in as he may be able to add something.

Dave

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Aug 04, 2018

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well a wide gammut sounds nice, the main thing is that I want to actually produce HDR content and push the whites and colors to be brighter than on a normal display. I am not interested in print at all, just editing video and images meant for beeing viewed on HDR displays, does such color-calibration devices work with monitors that have a much higher contrast of brightness levels?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 04, 2018

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Hi

Video monitors are still calibrated to standards.

In addition, Photoshop will display everything you view through the monitor profile. If that does not match your monitor it will not be displaying correctly.

So yes a device to calibrate then profile your monitor is valid.

Dave

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 04, 2018

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Not much to add. For 10-bit display you need a Quadro or FirePro (which I thought was rebranded to Radeon Pro now, but maybe not).

As long as it's understood that HDR displays are totally off the charts in terms of brightness. You won't be on the same page, or the same planet, as anyone else. File interchange is not possible. Whatever you prepare on that monitor will look terrible everywhere else.

If you're fine with that, go ahead. At those light levels, I'd get the best general-purpose colorimeter out there, which is the i1Display Pro. It has dichroic glass filters that don't fade.

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Aug 04, 2018

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Hi Dag,

this is a subject I know nothing about really, out of interest is the real use for HDR monitors games? Also I have a really old i1DisplayPro and I mean old- circa 10years-Do you know if they handle the 1000CD/m2 brightness? My monitors struggles to reach 120.

I hate to think what a monitor that bright would do to the human eye if you were close to it in a production environment on a regular basis. I did a course once at the Institute of Ophthalmology in London and one thing I remember about it was researchers put pigeons in the cool cabinets they have in supermarkets -not because it's cold but very brightly lit-the pigeons on average where totally blind after 12 hours as the intense light burnt out the rhodopsin in the pigeons retina-scary stuff if humans behave the same.   

Terri

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 04, 2018

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I don't know. It might work well for movies, I suppose. I'm sure Tom Hanks could find his way out of a blinding sunstorm in HDR.

But the thing is, it can never become an all-round standard, or at least not anytime soon. There is still this thing called a print, and we're not getting rid of that yet. Representing paper white on screen is usually and normally around 100-150 cd/m² white point, depending.

If any sensor can handle it, I assume the i1D3 can. The question is how accurate it will be at those levels, which again begs a second question, why would you need it? You're already out there in the stratosphere where mere mortals never go.

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Aug 04, 2018

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thanks Dag. It sounds as if HDR is a case of technology for technology sake. We at home have a LG HDR OLED TV and it looks great for movies. Out of interest I connected the thing to my Dell laptop and it looked simply horrible even when standing ten feet away-sometimes the old way of doing things are better

Terri

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 04, 2018

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Interesting discussion on HDR here, from Spectracal who make software for video calibration:

Understanding HDR: An Interview with Joel Barsotti and Stacey Spears - YouTube

It includes a brief discussion on calibration and capabilities of meters at present

Dave

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Most Valuable Participant ,
Aug 04, 2018

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