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What are people here doing to calibrate two Mac displays?

Engaged ,
Aug 27, 2020

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Have a new iMac 2020 27" Retina and an older 27" LED Cinema display.
Apple used to have some degree of color adjustment in their monitor calibration software, but now it only has presets and white point adjustments. Preferring just simple solution to tone down the green cast on the  LED. I only use it for menus, but the color difference is jarring.

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What are people here doing to calibrate two Mac displays?

Engaged ,
Aug 27, 2020

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Have a new iMac 2020 27" Retina and an older 27" LED Cinema display.
Apple used to have some degree of color adjustment in their monitor calibration software, but now it only has presets and white point adjustments. Preferring just simple solution to tone down the green cast on the  LED. I only use it for menus, but the color difference is jarring.

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How to, Mac, Problem or error

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Aug 27, 2020 0
Adobe Employee ,
Aug 27, 2020

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Hi there,

 

The difference in the color output on the secondary display is quite offset. Have you tried using a third party color calibration tool?

 

Just a suggestion, have you to checked out any color calibration software for dual monitors? Example: https://www.xrite.com/en/service-support/calibrating_and_profiling_dual_monitors_on_mac_os_x_systems

 

This might help you in getting rid of the color cast. Also, checkout the standard recommendations for calibrating displays: https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/using/working-with-color-profiles.html#Calibrateandprofileyourmoni...

 

Hope that helps!

 

Thanks,

Akash

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Aug 27, 2020 2
Engaged ,
Aug 28, 2020

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Good tips. but we are talking 2020 iMac, and not the customizable 10 year old older Mac Pro I switched from. Apple has dumbed things down considerably. Only one card for one. That being said, easy to adjust any monitor from a good target image provided you have the controls. Apple has only white point these days with preset adjustments that of course, will vary between monitors. Any color profile adjustment in PS would be global, and would still result in different coloration between displays. I found it quite interesting that the Apple Community forums have been almost completely quiet on this topic - as if it's a non-issue for most Apple users...

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Aug 28, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 27, 2020

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You buy a calibrator...

 

This only demonstrates why you should never trust generic profiles and generic calibration tables. A calibrator that does actual measurement is always needed. Eizo even ship a dedicated calibrator with their high-end units.

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Aug 27, 2020 2
Engaged ,
Aug 28, 2020

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That's what I'm thinking after digging deeper. No other simple monitor color adjustment software out there for a two-display, one card system...  Certainly not for Apple displays.

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Aug 28, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 29, 2020

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The most important thing you do when calibrating a monitor is to set the white point and the black point. There is no automatic procedure for this, because it depends on your working environment and the ambient conditions.

 

The white you see on screen isn't "white". If it was, you'd need a welding mask. On screen white has a color, and it has a brightness. You pick the white point so that it matches a white surface under "normal" lighting conditions - like white paper. As it happens, most of us tend to agree that something around 6500K and 120 candelas per square meter (cd/m²) meets this requirement under most normal conditions. But of course nothing is ever perfectly normal, so adjustments are almost always necessary.

 

What this does, is set the environment for color management to operate in. Within this framework, white is white and black is black. And from this point on, a calibrator operates at very high precision to define the monitor's color space and ensure accurate display.

 

But 6500K is only one axis, the blue-yellow temperature scale based on black body radiation. There is also a magenta-green axis to consider. A monitor may well have a native white point that is off the Kelvin scale, in either the green or magenta direction. A more complete definition of white point is therefore the standard D-series illuminants. D65 is a more precise term than 6500K.

 

A monitor's native white point may be more or less off for a variety of reasons. Getting two monitors of different make and model to match perfectly may be difficult. You may need to set them to different values to get a visual match. This isn't because the calibration sensor is inaccurate, but because the eye and a sensor don't quite work the same way.

 

So what I'm getting at is that it's still a visual process and you need to trust your eyes on this. But once you have your white point and black point defined, a calibrator handles the rest reliably and accurately, much more precisely than you can do by eye.

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Aug 29, 2020 4
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 31, 2020

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D.Fosse makes some very good points -

Calibration targets (luminance, white colour temperature) are, I find, quite personal and environment based.

Also that the limitations in calibrating [matching] 2 screens using a sensor device [like i1display] sometimes reveals a technical limitation - instrument / eye metamerism. i.e. the way the instrument "sees" colour and tone may not quite match the way a human eye sees it. 

That said, a calibrator and decent software will get those screens a lot closer than Apple's old manual calibration used to. 

 

Additionally, if you are using your main display for serious imaging work then you should really own a hardware calibrator - that applies even if you had just one screen. The difference you are seeing between the two is illustrating to you just how different screens can be - and its often not noticed when they are used in isolation.

I hope this helps

 

neil barstow, colourmanagement.net :: adobe forum volunteer

[please do not use the reply button on a message within the thread, only use the blue reply button at the top of the page, this maintains the original thread title and chronological order of posts]

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Aug 31, 2020 2
Engaged ,
Aug 31, 2020

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Thank you all. I was certainly aware of the monitor hardware calibration options. My point was only that Apple used to have more adjustments available for visual color adjustment, so I was hoping for a simple software program that served that need. Pretty easy to visually match a good target image and get close enough to where I want to be. Since that does not exist, a more robust hardware/software set will be needed.

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Aug 31, 2020 1