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Why does editing a lightroom photo in photoshop DRASTICALLY increase the file size?

Participant ,
Nov 07, 2020

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Hi all,

I was trying out the sky replacement in the latest PS update. I had several tiff files in LR. I had LR open them up in photoshop to replace the sky. All I did was replace the sky, and then saved the files. The original lightroom tif files were 18.5 meg. The files I edited in PS are all around 150meg

 

Is photoshop the one increasing the file size? Or is LR doing that when it sends a copy of the tif file to ps?

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Correct answer by D Fosse | Adobe Community Professional

TIFF fully supports all kinds of layers.

 

Here's a random flat test TIFF where I used sky replacement. This is the resulting layers panel:

sky_layers.png

 

In this case the file size on disk went from 202 MB to 1.41 GB.

 

When I re-flatten this file, the size returns to 202 MB.

 

A flat file is stripped of a long list of file properties that otherwise increase file size. I'm very used to this size difference between flat and layered files, and I'm not for a second surprised.

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Why does editing a lightroom photo in photoshop DRASTICALLY increase the file size?

Participant ,
Nov 07, 2020

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Hi all,

I was trying out the sky replacement in the latest PS update. I had several tiff files in LR. I had LR open them up in photoshop to replace the sky. All I did was replace the sky, and then saved the files. The original lightroom tif files were 18.5 meg. The files I edited in PS are all around 150meg

 

Is photoshop the one increasing the file size? Or is LR doing that when it sends a copy of the tif file to ps?

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by D Fosse | Adobe Community Professional

TIFF fully supports all kinds of layers.

 

Here's a random flat test TIFF where I used sky replacement. This is the resulting layers panel:

sky_layers.png

 

In this case the file size on disk went from 202 MB to 1.41 GB.

 

When I re-flatten this file, the size returns to 202 MB.

 

A flat file is stripped of a long list of file properties that otherwise increase file size. I'm very used to this size difference between flat and layered files, and I'm not for a second surprised.

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Nov 07, 2020 1
Most Valuable Participant ,
Nov 07, 2020

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Entirely depends on the TIFF options used. The default is uncompressed, I believe, whereas your source files may have used some compression already.

 

Mylenium

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Participant ,
Nov 07, 2020

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both versions are uncompressed

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 07, 2020

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Sky replacement increases file complexity with several new layers, masks and blend modes. That in itself will increase file size many times over. If you flatten and resave, it will go back down to approximately former size (depending on compression options).

 

Those numbers seem perfectly normal and expected.

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Participant ,
Nov 07, 2020

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I'm not sure how the layers would matter....tifs are already a flattened image arent they? they don't support layers. If i open the edited file in PS again, there are no layers present.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 07, 2020

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TIFF fully supports all kinds of layers.

 

Here's a random flat test TIFF where I used sky replacement. This is the resulting layers panel:

sky_layers.png

 

In this case the file size on disk went from 202 MB to 1.41 GB.

 

When I re-flatten this file, the size returns to 202 MB.

 

A flat file is stripped of a long list of file properties that otherwise increase file size. I'm very used to this size difference between flat and layered files, and I'm not for a second surprised.

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Participant ,
Nov 07, 2020

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I take back what I said then 😉 I just reopened the image in PS and the layers are there. I could have sworn last time i did that there were no layers. I just flattened it and saved it and file size is now actually a little smaller then original 18.5 vs 16

 

Thanks for the help/explanation

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D Fosse LATEST
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 07, 2020

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🙂

 

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