Highlighted

why does photoshop export 300 ppi image as 72 ppi?

Participant ,
Nov 13, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

why is it if i open an image in PS which has a dpi of 300 (image sourced from Shutterstock), work on the image and then use Export As JPG, the resulting ppi is 72 according to PS. I checked my Export Prefs and they are set to JPG and 100 for quality, so why does it export as 72 and not 300? I need to supply images in my document at 300dpi not 72dpi

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by D_Fosse | Adobe Community Professional

Re-reading this old and lengthy thread, it certainly took its time to get to the heart of the matter. But it finally did.

 

So again: Export is for web/screen/mobile. Pixels per inch does not apply for screen viewing. Since it is not needed, the ppi value is stripped from the file.

 

And in case you're wondering where the 72 number comes from, it's the Photoshop default when there is no resolution metadata present. Photoshop needs to have some ppi number for other unrelated reasons, but any number will do. Most native Windows applications will assign 96.

 

So you see, pasane, there is nothing to fix. This works entirely as intended.

Views

17.7K

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more

why does photoshop export 300 ppi image as 72 ppi?

Participant ,
Nov 13, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

why is it if i open an image in PS which has a dpi of 300 (image sourced from Shutterstock), work on the image and then use Export As JPG, the resulting ppi is 72 according to PS. I checked my Export Prefs and they are set to JPG and 100 for quality, so why does it export as 72 and not 300? I need to supply images in my document at 300dpi not 72dpi

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by D_Fosse | Adobe Community Professional

Re-reading this old and lengthy thread, it certainly took its time to get to the heart of the matter. But it finally did.

 

So again: Export is for web/screen/mobile. Pixels per inch does not apply for screen viewing. Since it is not needed, the ppi value is stripped from the file.

 

And in case you're wondering where the 72 number comes from, it's the Photoshop default when there is no resolution metadata present. Photoshop needs to have some ppi number for other unrelated reasons, but any number will do. Most native Windows applications will assign 96.

 

So you see, pasane, there is nothing to fix. This works entirely as intended.

Views

17.7K

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 13, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Don't use Save for Web, use Save As, and select JPG from the Format drop down menu.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Participant ,
Nov 13, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thanks for advice Derek, but I am not using save for web or save as, but my question relates to the "export as" function.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
LEGEND ,
Nov 13, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

To add to Derek's response, save as allows you to specify the ppi, whereas save for web assumes it will be on a screen where ppi is irrelevant.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Participant ,
Nov 14, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi Silkrooster, thx for the added comment, but my question is related to why when using "export as" for an image that is 300ppi, PS seems to export and save it as a 72ppi resolution image by default?

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 14, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Use Save As, not Export As.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
LEGEND ,
Nov 14, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Export as doesn't appear to have an option for the ppi, therefore I must assume it is the same situation as save for web. Meant for the screen therefore no ppi is embedded in the file and from what I can tell is RGB only.

The ppi that shows for the document when opening in a program is at the mercy of that program. It will determine the ppi.

If ppi and/or color mode is important (ex. sending to a printer that requires it) then it would be better to use File>Save As.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Participant ,
Nov 14, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

indeed, and i am aware i can do that. But then why is export as even there?? This still doesnt explain why a PS function is saving a 300ppi image as 72ppi, when it is used.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
LEGEND ,
Nov 14, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

There are a lot of people who use Photoshop for screen only images (web designer's, Game Illustrator's, etc.). The screen is not a printer therefore is has no concern for physical size, therefore there is no need for ppi.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Participant ,
Nov 14, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

So is the "Export As" function only for those preparing work for screen only images then? If so, what happens if one wanted to export an image at a higher ppi (pixels per square inch - screen dependent as opposed to dpi dots per square inch for printing), say 150ppi?

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 14, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

It's not pixels per square inch, but pixels per inch.

You set the image size and resolution in the Image Size dialogue box and then: File > Save (if you want to overwrite the existing file) or Save As and rename it and/or choose a format, such as JPG.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Participant ,
Nov 14, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

regardless of the semantics. I still havent had an acceptable answer as to what the "export as" function is for. If one is supposed to be able to export and image as 300ppi (PIXELS PER INCH) or not? To date, everyone says use Save As, and I know this function, but everyone seems to remain silent as to why not Export As, how Export As differs from Save As (in its application), and whether it is actually functioning correctly when one chooses to export an image which is showing 300ppi before export, to then showing 72ppi after export?

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
New Here ,
Jun 21, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Adobe explains the "Export" feature like this...

"...exporting lets you export a single layer, artboard or entire document with one click. Plus, get better compression, advanced preview options that include canvas size and enhanced asset extraction. It’s a modernized Save for Web experience." so export is ignoring features like high resolution and minimizes export to the minimum necessary resolution required for web use.

 

Sometimes an exported document may not be identical to the original (i.e. changed ppi), as the new format may not support the same feature set, but a saved document is generally expected to be identical to the original, including exact ppi

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 14, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I need to supply images in my document at 300dpi not 72dpi

And you need to supply them as JPG? You can't supply native PSD files?

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Participant ,
Nov 14, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

yes, in theory the images could be supplied as native PSD files, but in my case the images need to be 300ppi used within an InDesign document as a whole. And I dont see that i should have to use native PSD's for every image i use in an InDesign document destined for professional print.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 14, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

The advantage of using native PSD files in InDesign is that you can round-trip to adjust them.

By the way, I assume you know that you supply a PDF to your (commercial) printer from InDesign, probably PDF/X-4.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Participant ,
Nov 14, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Indeed an advantage, but also choosing "edit with" for a JPG in Photoshop can achieve similar options I believe when within an InDesign document. But we are going slightly off point here. I am aware that commercial printers will require a print-ready PDF, but the resolution of those images within it must be 300dpi (at least for the EU printers that I work with). I use many stock photos in my work and download them as 300dpi images, to use in my designs/documents. They are usually JPG file format. I therefore wish to retain the original DPI of the images.

My initial question is

Why does the Export As option in PS change the DPI to 72 from 300 when you Export.

Forget about the Save As option, I know about that and specifying that in the settings, what I want to know is what the Export As function is designed for, when it should and shouldn't be used, and why when it is used, it changes a 300ppi image to a 72ppi setting, seemingly by default.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 14, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Check out the pixel dimensions of the original stock images as they may be rather large and you may want resize them in PS before placing them in InDesign. You presumably know about "Effective resolution" in InDesign. The idea behind 300ppi is that it allows two pixels per line screen (say 150LPI), you can get away with less, say 200PPI at a pinch.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Participant ,
Nov 14, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thank you for the suggestions and help.

However, I am still no wiser in regard to

My initial question is

Why does the Export As option in PS change the DPI to 72 from 300 when you Export.

Forget about the Save As option, I know about that and specifying that in the settings, what I want to know is what the Export As function is designed for, when it should and shouldn't be used, and why when it is used, it changes a 300ppi image to a 72ppi setting, seemingly by default.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 14, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I dont see that i should have to use native PSD's for every image i use in an InDesign document

Hi craigriches66: You certainly don't have to, but there are many benefits to using native PSDs. In addition to round-trip editing and maintaining the ppi (which is, of course, what you are after), InDesign supports the ability to hide/show Photoshop layers and layer comps, and you can use Photoshop clipping paths and alpha channels to control both transparency and text wrap. In a nutshell: greater control, no need to mess with export, and no changing the resolution. Sounds good to me!

My initial question is: Why does the Export As option in PS change the DPI to 72 from 300 when you Export.

I think you will find the answers you are looking for in this thread:

How to export a JPEG with 300dpi? PS keeps exporting at 96dpi even though image res is set to 300px/...

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Participant ,
Nov 14, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Sounds good too! So you are suggesting I open my JPG downloaded from stock source and then Save As .psd instead of .jpg, correct?

would you mind explaining an answer to my original question then as well?

What is the Export As function for

When should it be use (what sort of workflow, screen or print)

Why does it save a 300ppi image as 72ppi when you select Export As?

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 14, 2016

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi Craig!

So you are suggesting I open my JPG downloaded from stock source and then Save As .psd instead of .jpg, correct?

YES!!! JPG files are lossy, which means they throw out data as you save them. The rule of thumb is always to open a JPG, immediately save it as a PSD, edit away, and if you want a JPG at the end, only then do you Save as or Export as to JPG. Someone with good saving habits (like saving every 5-10 minutes) will quickly make the JPG unusable, because each save tosses out pixel info. Who knew, right?

Export as is for an online workflow. High res displays are still low res compared to print. In the thread I pointed you to, it was mentioned that while the dialog box should have a way to set the ppi, it doesn't, so that means you can't use it in a print workflow. And while InDesign accepts JPGs, my personal workflow is to stick with PSDs for all the reasons mentioned above.

I hope that helps, but if not, come back and let us clarify!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
New Here ,
Jun 20, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi Craig,

I understand and sympathize with your "Export As" frustrations and its inability to keep the original resolution. The workflow for our files requires creating a transparent PNG at 300 ppi (I'll explain why below.) We start with a native CMYK photoshop file at 100% size @ 300 ppi. The file gets reduced by 50% at 300 ppi. In previous versions of photoshop (CS4 or CS6?) "Export As" retained the original ppi. This made it perfect for our workflow, and everything could be done in one click. It reduced the file by half, changed it to PNG, changed it to RGB, retained transparency, and kept it at 300 ppi--all without having to make a single change to my native CMYK PSD. Unfortunately, newer versions of PS now change the resolution to 72 regardless of the original ppi. This adds a whole additional step when using "Export As" (changing the resolution back to 300 ppi) to the workflow, which is frustrating.

Other commenters have suggested simply using "Save As" but in my case, a 50% reduction still needs to be done, as well as converting to RGB before I can save it as a PNG. So this adds two additional steps to my process, plus it means I have to make sure NOT to save changes to my original PSD file. So "Save As" is a worse option for my workflow. When we are talking about a large team using this workflow daily, adding any additional steps is never good. And even more frustrating since we used to be able to do this without an issue until Adobe made the default resolution 72 ppi upon export.

For those that are suggesting that resolution doesn't matter because it's screen--you're right as long as it's being ONLY used on screen. For our workflow, the PNG files go on to a digital asset management library which is also the back end for our website. So resolution doesn't matter there.  However, these same PNG files also get used for print. Yes, that might sound heretical to some of you, but an RGB lossles PNG can be used just fine in certain print processes. Every once in a while we do get a bit of a color shift from the original CMYK PSD on certain images, but it's a sacrifice we easily made in order to reduce the number of files and amount of time to have and manage 2 different file types. When you're dealing with hundreds of thousands of files like this, a little color shift is perfectly acceptable for images that are merely product representations anyway--especially when it means not having to double our time and number of assets to accommodate both web and print scenarios. Since the DAM software requires a transparent PNG as the "original" source file in order to serve as the back end for the website, we are stuck with using transparent PNGs in our workflow for both web and print--and it has worked nearly perfectly (except for the "Export As" hiccup.)

I get that "Export As" is designed with web only use in mind, but it could be a much more powerful tool if resolution could be controlled, and maybe even some additional file types added. The workflow I've described maybe isn't typical, but for some of the reasons I've touched on it's the workflow we have to use. "Export As" used to meet our needs perfectly, but no longer does now that it changes the default resolution to 72.

For now, the best workaround is to change the resolution back to 300 ppi after export. I've considered using the "Generate Assets" feature, but it's a bit overkill with only one export happening per file. We do use that for some of our files where we have to generate many assets at 50% from one layered PSD. I've also considered setting up an action, but from a procedural perspective, I'd prefer our staff not have to rely on actions if they can accomplish it through simple menu commands (which used to be the case before Adobe changed the default to 72 ppi.) One additional step might not sound like a big deal to some people, but for those who work with large teams and workflows with many steps, one additional step makes a big difference.

Appreciate all of the ideas. But for now, the only answer to the OP is what Barb said: "while the dialog box should have a way to set the ppi, it doesn't." We all have different workflow requirements, and this would be a lifesaver for our team if it kept the original resolution instead of changing it (after all, if it's for web it doesn't matter, right?!) or if there was an option to set the ppi. I'll keep exploring the best workaround for our team.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Most Valuable Participant ,
Jun 21, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I see the statement over and over that Export changes the resolution to 72 ppi. I don't think it does that, though the effect may seem to be. If I am right, these Q&A explain why it's wrong (but largely unimportant) to say that Export changes the resolution to 72 ppi.

Q. Do JPEG files have to contain a resolution (ppi value)

A. No, it's optional.

Q. What happens when an app opens a JPEG without a resolution (ppi)?

A. It's entirely up to the app what it does. Some apps will remember that there is no resolution at all, or ask for one. But most apps will set a default resolution.

Q. Ok, what happens when Photoshop opens a JPEG without a resolution (ppi)?

A. Photoshop assumes 72 ppi, and you cannot tell whether this came from the file or was used because the file said nothing. Many other apps do exactly the same thing.

Q. So, does Export set 72 ppi?

A. No, export sets NOTHING because it is for use with web graphics, where resolution (ppi) is irrelevant.

Q. How does that go again?

A. The export sets NO RESOLUTION (ppi). When an app reopens the JPEG, Photoshop (and many others apps) assume it was 72 ppi. So it's exactly as if the resolution was set to 72 ppi and impossible to tell without a detailed analysis of the JPEG internals.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
New Here ,
Jun 21, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thanks for sharing this, TSN, it's an interesting thought. As you know, resolution does have meaning for print, and while the resolution may seem irrelevant since the pixel count doesn't change, it does change the size that the image prints. What I find strange--especially given your proposed explanation of how "Export As" supposedly treats resolution--is that it's different than the behavior of "Save As" which allows users to set the resolution--which in turn sets the image dimensions.

Because PS allows all kinds of file types to be saved out from the "Save As" dialog box, it makes sense that resolution would just be a parameter for all of them regardless of whether it's relevant or not to the specific file type. And if you hold to the idea that resolution is irrelevant for png and jpg, then being able to set it in the "Save As" dialog box is extraneous, and being able to set it in the "Export As" dialog box seems unneeded.

I hold a different perspective, which is that resolution--and by extension the corresponding image width and height--has great relevance in certain situations for png and jpg. Maybe it's not your situation nor is it a common situation, but nonetheless it is the situation I'm in and have no choice but to work with. Based on the fact that many people seem to be asking this question, I would guess the OP and I are not the only ones who see a use for the function.

I'm also pointing out that this behavior for "Export As" (whether warranted or unwarranted) was not always like this, and previous versions of Photoshop DID retain the starting resolution for jpg and png. It no longer does, and for most people that might be insignificant. For me, it's significant and I'd love to have an option to set the resolution on export. Since noticing the change after upgrading and the consequences on my workflow that I didn't have before, I've been wondering the same thing that the OP was asking. Your explanation makes sense (even though I disagree with the premise that resolution is irrelevant for jpg and png.) Unfortunately, it doesn't solve my particular issue.  But it's helpful to understand the behavior and the apparent thinking behind the behavior.

Thanks for considering the question and sharing your knowledge. It's great to be able to discuss such nerdy details like this!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Most Valuable Participant ,
Jun 22, 2017

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I didn't say resolution was irrekevant for JPEG and PNG. If these are to be printed or placed it's very relevant. What I said is that (1) it's irrelevant for web work and (2) export is for web work.

Either er if these statements might be wrong. (1) some people assert that ppi is important for web graphics. I've never understood the arguments here. (2) Some people might argue that the name of the Export function suggests it's for more general use. I have sympathy for that argument, but what do Adobe say?

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...