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Burn multiple projects to one DVD

Community Beginner ,
Nov 12, 2017

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Newby to the amazing world of video editing.  I have several projects (short ones) ready and want to burn them onto a DVD that will play in DVD players on most TVs.  I can do that with individual projects by burning them direct to disk as AVCHD files - but I don't see how I can do multiple projects onto the same DVD.

Appreciate any help and bear in mind I am definitely a NEWBIE

Thanks'

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Burn multiple projects to one DVD

Community Beginner ,
Nov 12, 2017

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Newby to the amazing world of video editing.  I have several projects (short ones) ready and want to burn them onto a DVD that will play in DVD players on most TVs.  I can do that with individual projects by burning them direct to disk as AVCHD files - but I don't see how I can do multiple projects onto the same DVD.

Appreciate any help and bear in mind I am definitely a NEWBIE

Thanks'

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Nov 12, 2017 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 12, 2017

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Creating a DVD and putting video files on a DVD disk are different.    Real DVDs with menus and everything are, by definition, a low quality Standard Definition (or SD) quality.  For a decade or so we've had High Definition (or HD) quality.  Lots of TVs and disc players can "upscale" the SD quality so that it looks OK. 

Most disc players, unless they are really old, can play files copied to disks.  Try making your MP4 videos from Premiere Elements to your computer's HDD.  Then use Windows Explorer or Apple Finder to copy those files to your disk.  Then see if they play. 

In many cases the newest TVs will play files directly from a USB memory device plugged into the TV.  Disks and disk players aren't needed.  Most disc players have a USB port too.

Unless you really need menus, traditional SD quality DVDs are going away. 

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Nov 12, 2017 1
Community Beginner ,
Nov 12, 2017

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Thanks whsprague - I can try that.  I really don't require a menu - I have been saving them as AVCHD format (which fgives me high definition)?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 12, 2017

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https://forums.adobe.com/people/Geo+mazz  wrote

Thanks whsprague - I can try that.  I really don't require a menu - I have been saving them as AVCHD format (which fgives me high definition)?

"AVCHD" is a complicated specification originally created by Sony and Panasonic along with the Blu-Ray specifications.  It is HD but has some choices.  The basic idea is that your output should be close to the same as your source clips.  And, through the output menus of whatever version you have, you want to end up with a HD mp4 file. 

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