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Moire effect when burning a AVCHD clip to a SD 576 disc to view on a DVD player

New Here ,
Apr 27, 2017

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moire effect when panning a brick wall only shows when burning a sd disc from an AVCHD clip

recorded on  Panasonic GH5 in AVCHD 50fps & burnt on a DVD-R SD 576 25 fps.

However AVCHD 50 fps  burnt to  DVD_R AVCHD 25fps no problem. Is there a way of improving image quality when burning to SD disc?

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Moire effect when burning a AVCHD clip to a SD 576 disc to view on a DVD player

New Here ,
Apr 27, 2017

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moire effect when panning a brick wall only shows when burning a sd disc from an AVCHD clip

recorded on  Panasonic GH5 in AVCHD 50fps & burnt on a DVD-R SD 576 25 fps.

However AVCHD 50 fps  burnt to  DVD_R AVCHD 25fps no problem. Is there a way of improving image quality when burning to SD disc?

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Apr 27, 2017 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 27, 2017

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Where are you seeing this moire effect? How and where are you previewing your disc?

Remember that computers use progressive frames while older TVs (and current DVDs) use interlaced video. So a DVD played on your computer is going to show interlacing "combing" you won't see on your TV.

(Some media players, like VLC Media Player, also compensate for much of the combing by blending frames. However, if you play a 720x480 DVD full-screen on a 1280x1024 or larger computer monitor, you will still see some reduced resolution -- regardless of what resolution your original camcorder video was.)

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Apr 27, 2017 0
New Here ,
Apr 27, 2017

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I'm playing it on a matching Panasonic smart 42 inch  tv via  Panasonic HDD recorder/plaver (both 4 years old). the DVD burnt was put on into the DVD/CD tray of the recorder/player

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Apr 27, 2017 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 27, 2017

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Is the combing effect constant throughout your movie or is it only evident when there is some sort of fine lines (like a pattern on a shirt or miniblinds)?

Also, was your 50 fps AVCHD file 50i or 50p?

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Apr 27, 2017 0
New Here ,
Apr 28, 2017

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Thanks for your assistance. I recorded it on a GH5 AVCHD 1080p 50p, edited on prem element 15 -AVCHD 50p  .the shot was panning a steam train going across a brick viaduct put onto disc SD 576 & played back on a Panasonic.

Previously I used a Panasonic FZ200 & prem. elements 12 & moire effect was not apparent.

     Could it be the FZ200 had anti aliasing filter & the GH5 does not have one ?

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Apr 28, 2017 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 28, 2017

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No. It's likely just the nature of interlaced video showing elements like brickwork. As I said, mini-blinds and a pin-striped shirts were notorious for messing up shots on TV. If your issue is limited to this or just a few segments of your DVD, that's likely what is happening.

Unfortunately, Premiere Elements does not include an option for customizing your DVD frames. If you output your video and then use a third-party disc authoring program (Nero, DVD Architect, etc.), you may be able to minimize this issue by selecting 24p output rather than 50i or 60i.

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Apr 28, 2017 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 28, 2017

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Don't convert 50p to 24p. Will make things even worse.

Make sure when panning wall etc do it very sloooooow or not at all.

I tend to avoid panning only when following a subject.

If you want to play a dvd on a big screen you will have to use a bluray player which which handles dvd much better then an old fashioned dvd playr and also has a build in upscaler.

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Apr 28, 2017 0