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Extreme Branding BMPCC 6k Pro in Premiere

Community Beginner ,
Jul 18, 2023 Jul 18, 2023

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I've been experiencing extreme banding on gradients when editing footage shot on the Black Magic Pocket Cinema Camera 6k Pro in Premiere. I've read extensive discussions on why this may be. I understand the issue to be with consistent bit depth throughout the workflow - making sure everything is 10bit - but despite all efforts I still experience the issue. I do not experience this issue in Resolve.  Reference images attached below.

 

Footage settings:

Apple ProRes 422

YCbCr 4:2:2 10bit

Rec.709 color space

3840x2160

60fps

Pixel Aspect Ratio 1.0

 

Footage in examples is converted using Phantom Utopia P6k 3D Conversion Lut. I've tried Film to Extended video conversion LUTs provided by BMD and still experience the issue.

 

Timeline Settings:

3840x2160

60fps

MBD On

MRQ On

Preview File Codec: Apple ProRes 422

Using Lumetri curves to add contrast so you can see banding. Issue still persists without added contrast and no other plugins on footage.

Export settings are same as timeline settings. Issue persists.

 

Despite all efforts I can't seem to force the timeline to be in 10bit even though all settings point to the timeline being in 10bit. Banding does not appear when viewing in Apple Preview or Resolve. What is the issue? Has anyone else experienced this and found a work around?

 

 

Bug Unresolved
TOPICS
Color , Computer configuration , Editing and playback , Export , User experience or interface

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4 Comments
Community Beginner ,
Jul 18, 2023 Jul 18, 2023

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Example 1.png

Example 2.png

  

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LEGEND ,
Jul 18, 2023 Jul 18, 2023

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And if you don't apply the LUTs, grading manually, what do you get?

 

What are you shooting on the camera ... "Film" (which is log) or "Extended Video" ... ?

 

I shoot a BMPCC4K as main camera, don't have any problems whatever. Premiere handles media at it's native depth.

 

The main places I've seen banding from a pocket have been where the exposure in-cam wasn't ... optimal ... typically under exposed.

 

Btw, I shoot BRAW normally, and use the Autokroma plugin to handle the conversion to screen space. But I've shot enough "Film" to know how to quickly build a normalization ... I prefer my own normally.

 

Neil

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Community Beginner ,
Jul 18, 2023 Jul 18, 2023

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Thanks for the quick response Neil.

 

Shooting Film. Issue still persists when not applying any LUTS though its less noticable. Perhaps this clip is underexposed but the banding appears on the sky, the brightest part of the image, so I don't think thats the issue. It also persists across most of my other footage shot in 422 HQ, LT, Prxy alike, all in different shooting conditions. 

 

For the sake of time/speed I shoot ProRes to elimate the extra steps involved with shooting BRAW (as well as sparing my Sony-loyalist team members from editing with BRAW). 

 

Screenshots of raw, unprocessed clip in Premiere:

Screen Shot 2023-07-18 at 1.50.41 PM.png

Screen Shot 2023-07-18 at 1.50.36 PM.png

 

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LEGEND ,
Jul 18, 2023 Jul 18, 2023

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Banding can appear even on the 'brighter' sections of an image when expanding underexposed clips. In fact, that's where you are expanding the data the most. The most problematic spot.

 

Are you using false color on the cam or a field monitor to check exposure? I'm kinda old school, used to being stuck with what was recorded on film ... and it's many limitations. So I'm uber-cautious ... I meter carefully for contrast range, and use false color on both camera and field monitor to check  while setting up.

 

And zebras while shooting.

 

Paranoid ... the safest way to shoot ...

 

Neil

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