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Colouring looks different once exported

Community Beginner ,
Jul 14, 2017 Jul 14, 2017

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Every time I export a project on Premiere Pro the colour isn't as full, it looks dull and washed out in the export. After reading a load of forums they said that it was a problem with Quicktime so I uploaded the file anyway but it still looked the same so the problem wasn't with QT.

Here's an example of the vid in premiere pro and exported.

Screen Shot 2017-07-14 at 10.40.43.png

Screen Shot 2017-07-14 at 10.41.19.png

Has anybody had this problem? Can anybody give any advice on this?

Thank you in advance

Jordan

[Title edited and thread marked as a discussion rather than a question since there may be multiple answers or situations present. — Mod.]

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 14, 2017 Jul 14, 2017

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so I uploaded the file anyway

Where, how, what? Please be more specific.

What player are we looking at in the screendump.

Post screenshot of export settings.

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Community Beginner ,
Jul 14, 2017 Jul 14, 2017

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Hi there, thank you for your reply. Sorry for being vague. I meant I uploaded the video to YouTube and google drive and the video still looked the same as it did on QuickTime player so I don't think it's a problem with QuickTime (which is what other forums had said)

the top screen is PP and the second is QT

Thank you for your help

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Guide ,
Jul 14, 2017 Jul 14, 2017

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incorrect premise. Premiere actually does grade you-get-what-you-see in sRGB if your monitor is also calibrated sRGB. premiere will ignore any other color profiles. continuing on then: quicktime is not sRGB(0-255 gamma 2.2). quicktime(depending on the version), RGB values are 16-235 with various gamma styles like 1.8 or 2.4.

Furthermore, if you colorgrade in Premiere and your monitor is not sRGB, you will get incorrect grades because you are grading in the wrong native color profile. VLC can match premiere perfectly if you set its video output to OpenGL. Also, nvidia control panel needs to be set to 0-255 so that your gfx card doesn't change your RGB values in media playback.

Finally, occasionally, youtube will still muck up your video from time to time, depending on many factors including voodoo. some workarounds include using dnxhd as intermediate upload, using gamma fix luts, handbrake, etc. Only worry about these last ditch efforts if importing render back into premiere matches perfectly with project as well as vlc and youtube STILL mucks it up.

P3 lut fix

P3 color gamut of the iMac display (Retina, Late 2015)

youtube lut fix

CreativeCOW

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New Here ,
Sep 11, 2021 Sep 11, 2021

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Hi, I know it's been a few years since you made this comment, but is there anyway you could elaborate further on what you mean? Or put it in more laymans terms..? I'm having the same problem, and I don't quite understand how I would try to fix it without using the LUT fixes. How do you know how your monitor is calibrated, or change the calibration, etc? 

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Guide ,
Sep 11, 2021 Sep 11, 2021

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 12, 2021 Sep 12, 2021

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LATEST

Define "fix" ... and yea, it's that bad.

 

Due to the difference in the way the Mac Colorsync utility is set compared to the rest of the video world, you kinda get to choose. Look the same within ColorSync on Macs, or ... look proper on non-Mac systems with proper color.

 

Because they are very different in how they display the encoded media.

 

PrPro is set to use primarily on systems compliant to the normal, everyday and broadcast standard of Rec.709. Meaning it will produce media that looks similar to the maker's view when used on systems that have proper Rec.709 setup.

 

And as nearly all pro-produced media is Rec.709, including all non-HDR movies and streaming media, media produced to the Rec.709 settings will look similar to other pro produced media on every device out there.

 

Those devices are all over the place color-wise, but: they will do the same thing to all media. So produce to Rec.709, your media will get the same treatment as other pro stuff.

 

ColorSync throws a kink in the system. It displays the same media file quite differently than a system with Rec.709 standards.

 

So if you change the file to make it look one way on a ColorSync controlled system, you change the file. Might make it more like what you wanted on ColorSync, but way worse everywhere else.

 

You can't get the same file everywhere.

 

And yea, that's ... a pain.

 

Neil

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 14, 2017 Jul 14, 2017

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How does it look in VLC Player?

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Participant ,
Jul 14, 2017 Jul 14, 2017

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Are you using adjustment layers to colour correct/grade then sending to Adobe Media Encoder?

If so this is a known issue and can be fixed by opening Media Encoder preferences and under 'general' UNTICKING 'import sequences natively'. Alternatively you can export directly in PP but that means your PP will be busy until the encode is complete.

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Community Beginner ,
Jul 14, 2017 Jul 14, 2017

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Hey, thank you for your reply. I actually exported it directly in PP, I didn't use media encoder but still had problems.

And yes I've used an adjustment layer on the video.

Thank you for your help

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New Here ,
Mar 06, 2020 Mar 06, 2020

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jimbo_hippo! Your answer is 3 years old, but is the answer for that issue. At least in my case. Thanks a lot! It is the interpretation of the footage by MediaEncoder. After rendering in Premiere internally, it was fine. And your tip made the Encoder work properly again! Thanks, man!

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New Here ,
Sep 16, 2020 Sep 16, 2020

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It helped in my case! Thank you!

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LEGEND ,
Jul 14, 2017 Jul 14, 2017

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I think the first step in the quality control process is making sure you're viewing conditions are suitable.  That means two things.  First, eliminating variables that can alter the video signal.  And second, viewing on a properly calibrated display.

The first part means you need to get the video off the computer and play it from a hardware device.  I/O hardware from Blackmagic and AJA is designed for that task while working in PP.  Once exported, you can use a Blu-ray player or thumb drive on the TV.

For the second part, an excellent and affordable solution in the Disney WOW calibration Blu-ray.

Don't rush to judgement until after your viewing conditions are properly set up.  It could be you're right and there's a problem, but it could also be the result of improper viewing conditions.

Find out, then report back.

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Guide ,
Jul 18, 2017 Jul 18, 2017

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important tip!

-external displays are still limited by adobe's mercury transmit protocol that is hard coded to rec. 709 so you'll need to match that or use hardware luts or other means to qualify.

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LEGEND ,
Jul 19, 2017 Jul 19, 2017

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This surprises me, given that Deadpool was cut entirely in PP.  I would expect Transmit to just 'transmit' what's in the sequence.  If the editor has that set up for 2020...

(On a side note, P3 seems like a Colorspace that should be available as well, given the DCP exporting options.)

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Explorer ,
Dec 23, 2018 Dec 23, 2018

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My question is: even if our monitors are not calibrated correctly, why is the export still looking different? Why doesn't the uncalibrated monitor display the footage wrong in both scenarios?

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Guide ,
Dec 23, 2018 Dec 23, 2018

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cc 2019 supports color management now.

The problem is, the web is srgb 2.2 and premiere with color management on is BT1886(with it off its rec. 709 but ignores your monitor's profile). you could use a temporary viewing lut to offset grade in a faux srgb 2.2. firefox would match the best unless you'd want to fiddle with chrome's color profile tags. i'd use VLC over quicktime. quicktime is kinda all over the place with color depending on old atom tags from 2005 and custom luma levels.

here's two luts depending on if your going from FCPX to premiere or premiere to web/VLC/firefox. one darkens, other lightens. its a viewing lut only, so you'd disable prior to exporting.

if anyone says it don't work, i'll stop posting, but I haven't heard anything negative yet.

bt1886 to srgb/rec709 2.2 and srgb to bt1886

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1HHxxaOWifI3TEhBwEyGSl139x2jRM9dO

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LEGEND ,
Dec 23, 2018 Dec 23, 2018

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Why doesn't the uncalibrated monitor display the footage wrong in both scenarios?

Variables, like the Operating System, GPU driver, and even playback software.  They all mess with the signal.  So you need to get them out of the signal chain.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 23, 2018 Dec 23, 2018

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I'm assuming by both you mean "inside" Pr and in another viewer?

Pr works internally in video levels sRGB/Rec. 709/gamma 2.4, and will send that to the monitor.

The other apps probably are all over the place, and your system isn't set for sRGB/Rec.709/gamma 2.4.

So every app will be different.

Now, understand, even if you do have a perfect setup and grade ... no one on the planet will ever see exactly what it was on your system. Most will be way different. Which is what happens to every person working the trade everywhere.

Neil

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Advisor ,
Sep 16, 2020 Sep 16, 2020

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An I/O card from BMD or AJA is not going to help. Those cards are designed for digital cinema and broadcast color space. The video link might be worth watching.

https://youtu.be/K7EGNJop_HE

This video demonstrates a method to have your rendered images that are upload to YouTube look like what you see in the GUI of Premiere Pro.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 16, 2020 Sep 16, 2020

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Andy,

 

Actually, for someone really wanting absolute color management control of that reference image, using that output card is the first step because you need to get AWAY from your OS, the GPU, or any particular app controlling the image. Color Management 101.

 

Then ... you need to be able to calibrate that monitor and apply a LUT to control both "curve" and volume ... realistically, a 3D LUT. Generated for that task and installed in either the monitor or a LUT box in that AJA/BM output device.

 

Jim's suggestion for using the Disney "wow" calibration BluRay to set up a TV once you have the data out from the computer without the OS, GPU, or apps messing with the signal, can be a useful and less-expensive option.

 

Your YouTube offers a different "cheap & dirty" process, but it completely misses the issue of the OS problems that are there but different between different versions of each the Mac and Windows OS's. It offers a "workaround" that works in some cases but does not ensure that your viewing data is correct to begin with. And if it ain't right to begin with, any messing you do just likely makes it worse.

 

Jim's suggestion is on how to get past the OS to begin with.

 

Neil

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Advisor ,
Sep 16, 2020 Sep 16, 2020

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Niel,

Did I ever say the AJA and BMD products are no good under any cirumstances?

Do you have any on the products from AJA or BMD?

Did the orignal poster say anything about broadcating or digital cinema?

When exporting with DaVinci Reolve and then viewing it with the Quicktime Player it will yield the same result as Premiere Pro.

There is not a bug in Premiere Pro. There is a difference in color space between playback devices.

There is a gamma issues with Quicktime and YouTube.

My prior video demonstrates a solution that is much more practical than Jim's. Does Jim have any of the products from AJA or BMD?

Products from AJA and BMD are not designed to give real-time previews of what your video will look like once it is uploaded to YouTube or played back with Windows Media Player. The products from AJA and BMD will have proper color space for Digital Cinema and Broadcast not YouTube. Those products from AJA and BMD are ATSC 1.0 certifed but I am not sure of they are ATSC 3.0 certified. Very few places are capable of broadcasting to ATSC 3.0 standards in the year 2020.

The AJA and BMD products are helpful if you burn to Blu-ray as seen in the video link below but it will not have the same color space as YouTube or Quicktime. That being said Encore is no longer an option.

https://youtu.be/dVLUxRkPMdA



I use the Canopus ADVC 110 firewire DV converter and the Intensity Shuttle. Both products are discontinued. You must by them used. #firewiredvconverter #dvc...

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