Welcome Dialog

Welcome to the Community!

We have a brand new look! Take a tour with us and explore the latest updates on Adobe Support Community.


Exporting trimmed clips

Community Beginner ,
Jul 21, 2019 Jul 21, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I'm prepared to be told that this is a long-solved issue, and to be pointed to a, or several, forum threads with detailed answers...but I have exhausted my own forum and broader internet search...so with that apology/caveat - I present my issue.

I have approx 20GB of GoPro footage shot over the span of about 45 minutes (2k, 59.94 FPS), and have transferred those video files to a hard drive.  I have used the source monitor to create trimmed clips from those longer source files and made a bin of just those trimmed file references - each with a name that makes sense to the content.

I can add all of those clips to a timeline - the clips retain their name and the in/out settings.

I would like to "shrink" the project down to just the clips - I'd like to not continue using the hard drive that the original, untrimmed files are on, and I may also want to use just the trimmed files in more of a mobile workflow on my iPad Pro...using Rush.

I just want the original clips trimmed down to individual files while retaining their original quality and frame rates.

I've tried exporting the media - h.264 compressed a 30-second clip down to 37mb...that has to be a lot of loss.  When I tried the project manager, it created individual clips as I wanted, but those 8 minutes of clips turned into 39gb of files...essentially 2x the original, fully untrimmed footage size.

Any assistance is much appreciated.

Views

2.1K

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines

correct answers 1 Correct answer

Adobe Community Professional , Jul 22, 2019 Jul 22, 2019
I would personally go this round trip for more safety:01. Trim your clips02. Create a new bin where to put your trimmed clips03. select that bin04. right click on each trimmed clip (from source monitor or timeline) and select 'Make Subclip'05. a dialog box appears to name your subclip, hit enter06. select all your trimmed clips (from the bin you created in the project panel) - right click - Export Media07. Choose Format H.264 and Preset 'Match Source High Bitrate' (maybe QuickTime GoPro Cineform...

Likes

Translate

Translate
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 22, 2019 Jul 22, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I would personally go this round trip for more safety:

01. Trim your clips

02. Create a new bin where to put your trimmed clips

03. select that bin

04. right click on each trimmed clip (from source monitor or timeline) and select 'Make Subclip'

05. a dialog box appears to name your subclip, hit enter

06. select all your trimmed clips (from the bin you created in the project panel) - right click - Export Media

07. Choose Format H.264 and Preset 'Match Source High Bitrate' (maybe QuickTime GoPro Cineform... whatever)

08. give an output name and follow it by 01 (others will be named x02 x03 etc...)... you can choose the naming structure you find best

09. click on Queue, this will batch import all of your trimmed clips to Media Encoder

10. Select all in Media Encoder, click on Output File and set the desired location

11. start the queue

12. double check all your exported media, if okay you can delete or backup the originals somewhere else

NB: you can export to whatever format suits you best, something like GoPro Cineform is good too ...

you can also check Ann Bens' advice here: How to purge unused video files!?

but i don't think this will work for 'trimmed' clips

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Jul 22, 2019 Jul 22, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thanks for the quick and helpful response...the subclip recommendation appears to be the ticket..it reduced the encoding to the trimmed portion rather than sourcing the full, untrimmed file.  It would be a bit more efficient if I could create the subclips by selecting the bin or a group of clips - rather than one at a time, but that isn't a deal breaker...thanks again!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 22, 2019 Jul 22, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

you can request for batch export from timeline and lossless cut capabilities inside premiere pro:

Adobe video & audio apps

Let us know when you do and I will vote!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Enthusiast ,
Jul 22, 2019 Jul 22, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Use Lossless Cut, a free app that does exactly what you need, and is fast (no re-encoding needed) also ad-free and BS-free:

Releases · mifi/lossless-cut · GitHub

More info about it here:

GitHub - mifi/lossless-cut: Save space by quickly and losslessly trimming video and audio files

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Jul 22, 2019 Jul 22, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thanks for the quick and helpful response...I have (and still do) use Lossless Cut as my go-to, but either because of the more recent update, or because of the combination of GoPro settings during capture, while I can play and set in/out points, it gives an ffmpeg error when I try to export the trimmed copy.

I'm leaning toward the GoPro footage as the culprit - when I use Lossless Cut on the exported subclips from Premiere, it behaves normally.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 22, 2019 Jul 22, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
LEGEND ,
Jul 22, 2019 Jul 22, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Adobe has mislabeled things in Premiere Pro.  "Smart Rendering" refers to the process of creating a new file from GOP-based media without reencoding it.  Knowing where the GOP boundary is and using that, rather than the editor defined In/Out points, is what makes it "smart".

Currently, Adobe software is not capable of Smart Rendering anything.  With non-GOP codecs like ProRes and DNx, it is possible to get an export without reencoding, but that's just a straight file copy, that is not Smart Rendering.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Beginner ,
Jul 20, 2021 Jul 20, 2021

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

LATEST

You're right Premiere has no native smart rendering.
You can use the Project Manager "Consolidate and Transcode" to render only trimmed parts of your clips but this does not answer perfectly to the quality requirement: clips are re-encoded in a given codec and this creates a quality loss.
Unfortunately there is no free solution for this specific issue but there is a paid plugin that does smart rendering, it is called PlumePack, for non-GOP codecs (ProRes, Braw, RED) it trims the files at the given boundaries (+handles) and for GOP codecs it uses the closest GOP boundary from in/out points.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
LEGEND ,
Jul 22, 2019 Jul 22, 2019

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

To keep the original quality, you need a codec that will make the files larger.  You can't have both quality and small files.  You'll need to choose.

For things like this, I always recommend using Cineform YUV 10 bit.  Quality 3 is probably sufficient.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines