Fill empty spaces in audio levels

Explorer ,
Jul 18, 2022 Jul 18, 2022

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Hello guys,

I need your advice.

The clip that I`ve been working on has some empty spaces in the audio levels: basically, I needed to drop down with the pen tool audio levels in order to remove unwanted background noises or directions that I gave to actors during the shooting. Now , I have these empty spaces in sound that I don`t know how to fill.

 

I`ve tried different solutions: because I didn`t record a backround noise at the time of the shooting, I recorded some today with my mic. It doesn`t work. I`ve tried with some ambience noise downloaded from the web. Also this doesn`t work. 

 

Do you have any advice to solve this problem?

 

Many thanks!

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Audio , Editing , Error or problem , How to

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 18, 2022 Jul 18, 2022

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Ahh, didn't think to record 'extra' background audio, and this is a problem, isn't it? Been there done that.

 

First thing is to sort through the clips from that shoot, looking for any other breaks no matter how short. I salvaged one shoot by doing this. I put the main clip on a timeline, went into 'pancake mode' to get a second timeline panel below that one. Then scrubbed down the upper one of the clip, for any break no matter how short.

 

I'd cut, then drag down to the lower seqeunce. I got maybe a minute total of usable background.

 

Then I duped that sequence, put it on three different tracks. Cut each in a different place, adding the front-cut section to the end of that one. Over and over making each track finally long enough to 'cover' the shoot. While trying just to get as much randomness to the sound as possible.

 

This took me somewhat over an hour, realistically. To get a half-decent 20 minute audio track.

 

Then I did just a bit of EQ to the files, to make them a bit lower in the spoken-voice frequencies, and exported as a wav file. Added that to the original 'shoot' sequence, and got by.

 

Another shoot, I was able to listen to the basic background noise, some air-system sound, occasional talking or objects bumping, and then re-create those. Think of doing "foley" work to create that background.

 

For another, I just created an entirely new 'background' by taking segments of audio of this & that, mushing down some frequencies, lifting/dropping volume at random times, and again, duping that but cut a bit differently. Then making a 'new' file and adding that to the original shoot audio.

 

Different things to try.

 

Neil

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 18, 2022 Jul 18, 2022

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I copy pieces of the audio where there is no dialog, cutting multiple pieces and assembling them to the needed length.  I also use a combination of audio dissolve transitions and reversing some audio pieces.

 

You may also be able to do this more efficiently in Audition.  Ask here:

https://community.adobe.com/t5/audition/ct-p/ct-audition?page=1&sort=latest_replies&lang=all&tabid=a...

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