Horizon Leveling - adjustment mid-clip

Community Beginner ,
May 25, 2022 May 25, 2022

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So I was on a plane and used my go-pro max to make a video out the window while we were landing.  I used a suction cup to hold the go-pro still to keep the vibrations down.  Unfortunately as the plane's pitch changed, the angle of the video changed.

 

So, I later learned that the GoPro Max has horizon leveling built in.  Great - on another flight I made a video of the take-off and landing.  Unfortunately the force created by the plane as the plane speeds up or brakes so quickly throws off the horizon leveling on the camera and for the 35 seconds or so that we're on the runway it's at an angle that's worse that had I had the feature ont he camera turned off.

 

I saw a number of videos showing how to change the leveling, but is there a way to change it mid-clip?  I'm thinking if I can change it at the right point and transition the change to the right duration I'll be OK.

 

I'm a Novice to Premier.  I've used it before but infrequently and at the point that every time I use it I basically have to re-learn a lot of it, so please bear with me.

 

TY

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Adobe Community Professional , May 26, 2022 May 26, 2022

You could try to manually adjust the 'level' of the image by using the 'rotation' control in the 'Effects Controls' panel.

Select the clip in your timeline just before the point before the image starts to tilt > go to Effects Controls and click the stopwatch icon next to 'Rotation'. Now move along you timeline until the image has reach 'full tilt' and now adjust rotation in Effects Controls so the image is level. See how that looks. You will likely need to add other keyframes (by adjusting rotat

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 26, 2022 May 26, 2022

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You could try to manually adjust the 'level' of the image by using the 'rotation' control in the 'Effects Controls' panel.

Select the clip in your timeline just before the point before the image starts to tilt > go to Effects Controls and click the stopwatch icon next to 'Rotation'. Now move along you timeline until the image has reach 'full tilt' and now adjust rotation in Effects Controls so the image is level. See how that looks. You will likely need to add other keyframes (by adjusting rotation again) at various points during the plane accelerating.

You will also now have black edges revealed when the rotaion is applied ... so you will need to use the 'scale' setting in Effects Controls to expand the image. You'll lose some of the edges of your frame ... but nothing can be done about that.

The above may not work, it may look janky, but see how you go. 

 

Not sure if this would work but try 'the 'warp stabilizer' plugin (found in the 'Effects' menu) on your clip. If the wing is visible in your shot Warp Stabilizer *may* have enough static image to lock onto - won't know until you try.

 

 

 

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Community Beginner ,
May 27, 2022 May 27, 2022

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This worked great.  Adter I made this post I was playing around with the rotater, but I ended up cutting the clips and disolving them together.  Your idea worked much better.  Thanks

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 27, 2022 May 27, 2022

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Great to hear it worked out!

Which one worked for you? The rotation/scale idea or the Warp stabilizer?

If it was 'rotation aand scale ...

What you will find as you learn more is that the keyframes you created for that default to linear movement. 

 

As a plane takes off the G-force applied to your camera is non-linear - in that it starts slow, increases and then eases off. It is possible for you to make your keyframes for the 'rotation' also have this 'ease' on the rotation movement and may make the rotation effect you have applied more closely match the rotation in-camera.

 

Something to explore as you go along. Google search online  'Premiere Pro ease' for more info

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Community Beginner ,
May 29, 2022 May 29, 2022

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I used the rotate and scale.  I don't quite understand keyframes yet but realize I should learn them.

 

One thing I will put out there, while not Adobe Related, definitely topic related, the first video I made, prior to turning on Horizion Stabilazion on the GoPro, only had to be rotated about 5º or 6º max, where the videos with the Horizon Stabilazion had to be rotated as high as 12º.  This means those vides had to be scaled more and I lost a lot of the material around the border.

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