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How Do I Get Rid of Heavy Sibilance in Premiere Pro

New Here ,
Jun 19, 2021 Jun 19, 2021

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Hi all - I'm brand new to Adobe Premiere as of about a month ago. Some friends are helping me launch a new YouTube series and teaching me how to edit in Premiere as we go. The audio recorded for the first episode is not the best due to some mic issues I had while filming and I'm trying to salvage it. I've managed to make it sound significantly better, but there is still a really noticable amount of sibilance on it and I'm hoping someone can help me figure out how to reduce it. I'm using the DeEsser tool and I've been playing around with it and watching YouTube tutorials for hours, and I still can't get the audio anywhere near where I want it. I also read that you can sometimes just use the Paramatic Equalizer tool to get rid of sibilance, but I have even less of a clue what I'm doing in that tool.

 

The current audio effects I have on the footage are:

DeNoise: 35%

DeReverb: 55%

DeEsser: 6100 Hz Ducking Preset w/ -40dB setting on Multiband (CF 5400, Bandwidth 1400)

Vocal Enhancer: Music (weird I know but this actually did make my voice sound clearer)

Amplify: +5dB

 

I'm obvious happy to lose or change any of these, I just need some assistance figuring out what to do.

 

Here is a Dropbox that has:

-A video of 3 scenes from my video strung together with no effects added,

-The same video with the effects/settings I listed above added

-A folder of the raw video files of the 3 scenes. I'm not sure if the compressed version with no effects added that I output from Premiere will have any change/loss in quality, so these are the original uncompressed source.

 

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/tfsutlnb6zakaii/AADEesm0ZpT-kh6Rv6zo2AUVa?dl=0

 

Thank you in advance if you're able to offer any help!

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Guide ,
Jun 20, 2021 Jun 20, 2021

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i took a look. first, always first parametric EQ out the simple stuff. you got a hum at 156hz, and a hissing at 6800hz which when notched out, will greatly reduce your de-essing problem. always run the least ambiently destructive effects first, like Eq/hum. then run de-esser and de-reverb. then multiband compression where you can control what pops, then finally loundess normalization BS 1770. there's several good de-reverb plugins out there like spl deverb and you should try them as your reverb is a bigger problem than your s's. get some sound absorbing material in the recording area and move the mic closer to your mouth.

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