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How should I export video clips?

New Here ,
Jun 18, 2024 Jun 18, 2024

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I am a veterinarian doing a research project which requires that I edit smaller clips from large videos.  I'm not a video editor or film maker.  I just want to export the clips to my desktop so that I can review them later and share with colleagues.

 

So far I am finding Premire Pro to be maddening (it came with a software suite with my university computer, perhaps its jut the wrong program for really basic needs like mine?) but now I can make clips.

 

However, what the heck format should I be using to export my clips as short movies?  I've tried several different options only to find that I can't play the clips due to lack of the right media player on my laptop.  I have windows media player and VLC media player.  Downloading software has to be done by our IT dept so I can't just add whatever media player I want without going through some hassle.

 

I can download as JPEG movie but that also saves an individual JPEG of every frame on my laptop, which I don't want and I just spent a bunch of time deleting.

 

Other formats that I downloaded could not be viewed with my exisiting media player.

 

If anyone has suggestions for a more intuitive simple program for quickly clipping videos, I am all ears.

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correct answers 1 Correct answer

Adobe Employee , Jun 18, 2024 Jun 18, 2024

It's true there are many ways to accomplish the basics in Premiere Pro, so in addition to Bill's suggestion, here is what I would propose for the simplest way to export smaller parts of your clips:

 

  1. If you just need to export a section of a longer video, you can import that video in the Project panel, then double click the clip to load it into the Source Monitor. There you can position the playhead on the first frame you want and hit " i " on the keyboard to set your In Point. Then position th
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Community Expert ,
Jun 18, 2024 Jun 18, 2024

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Video editing software can drive any of us mad!  It is necessarily complex for those that make blockbuster movies.  The trick for the rest of us is to find and use only the parts and tools we need.    

 

If it were me, I would use the "Work Area Bars".  They are markers at the top of the timeline.  You move them with your mouse.  The left one is harder to grab because it is normally partially hidden. 

 

You can also set the left bar with "Alt+[" and the right bar with "Alt+]".

 

Load the entire large video on the timeline.  Then set the "bars" at the beginning and end of the smaller part you want to keep.  When you export there is a drop down menu choice for "Work Area".   The output will be only the part you marked with the bars. 

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Adobe Employee ,
Jun 18, 2024 Jun 18, 2024

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It's true there are many ways to accomplish the basics in Premiere Pro, so in addition to Bill's suggestion, here is what I would propose for the simplest way to export smaller parts of your clips:

 

  1. If you just need to export a section of a longer video, you can import that video in the Project panel, then double click the clip to load it into the Source Monitor. There you can position the playhead on the first frame you want and hit " i " on the keyboard to set your In Point. Then position the playhead on the last frame you want and hit " o " to set the Out Point. This sets the In-Out range that you will export, or,
  2. If you already have edited together some clips in a timeline, ignore step 1 and just use that timeline. You can also use the i/o keys to set In and Out points there if you like, then
  3. Use the Quick Export feature which is in the header bar at the top right of the window. The icon is a square with an arrow pointing up. There you can click on the blue path name to set a file name and location to export to, and then you just need to choose an export preset. Use "Match Source – Adaptive High Bitrate" as a good default. This means it will match the frame size and frame rate of your source material and give you a decent balance between visual quality and file size. Use the "Match Source – Adaptive Low Bitrate" if you'd like to sacrifice some visual quality and get a smaller file out of it.
  4. Click Export

 

Those presets will create a .MP4 file that uses the H.264 video codec. It is by far the most common video format out there today and should be compatible pretty much anywhere, without installing anything extra.

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New Here ,
Jun 18, 2024 Jun 18, 2024

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OMG thank you.  That worked perfectly.

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