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How to get nested sequences to display each audio track separately?

New Here ,
Aug 25, 2021 Aug 25, 2021

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Hi,

 

I'm wondering if there's a way to use nested sequences where each of the audio tracks within the nested sequence will display as a separate track when I use the nested sequence in a different timeline?

 

The reason I'm asking is that I'm using nested sequences to wrangle synced audio and video, and I'd like to keep all the original mono audio files directly available and un-mixed throughout the edit, but I'm hoping that using nested sequences will allow me to edit faster and avoid accidental loss of sync by keeping the video 'linked' with the audio, as though it were a single clip. I would've used the 'merge clips' function, except that this doesn't work when you have a single video clip that spans two or more audio clips (see below)

Screen Shot 2021-08-25 at 5.15.27 PM.png

I could obviously cut the video clip at the audio clip break, and merge it as two separate clips, but I'd like to avoid this if possible.

 

I've messed around a bit with the Modify--> Audio channels... settings, and Sequence setttings for the nested clip, but can't seem to get this to work.

 

Anyone know how to get this to work? Or have ideas for achieving the same thing a different way?

 

Thanks,

Max

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Audio, Editing

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 25, 2021 Aug 25, 2021

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You can't do this with a nest and with my brief test you can't do it even if you manually create a multichannel sequence. The audio still comes in as only one track. I can give you a couple of other tips on working this way, though, since some of my projects are like this (multicam with many audio tracks).

 

I guess the main tip really is this: iterate your sequences. First sync up your video and audio, duplicate it. You'll always have that sequence now.

Then you can drop that sequence into another sequence (or nest it and just name it appropriately), duplicate it again (if you wish)

I recommend using ripple editing on your first pass through it, the radio edit as some would call it. Again, for me that looks a lot like the pic you took with a nested video track and a bunch of audio tracks. But like you said, inside the nest it's all the full, original timeline that I sync'd everything up in. If you wanted to pull any audio back out from there you would just use Match Frame and insert it back into your sequence (you'd have to toggle the insert or overwrite clips as nests or individual clips button to your liking on how you want to bring it back in.)

Match Frame will also work for pulling out the audio back into the track from your original video clips as well. Really, there's just a bunch of ways where you can maintain the sync and not worry about losing something. Duplicate your sequences frequently so you can always work backwards if something messes up. For me that's all the safety I've ever really needed.

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