How to grade like this pic?

Enthusiast ,
Apr 02, 2022 Apr 02, 2022

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Dear community, i have tried to grade my green clip to be bluis clip with dark green. But i think the result of my grading become really ugly.

What i want to grade is this :

dev-mencari-secercah-kesejukan-di-kebun-teh-kemuning-2.jpeg

Look like auto rec.709.

My sample clip is this :

Siang Hari (Kebun).jpg

Bluis with dark green, really artistic grade in my opinion

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i have tried hue vs hue curve to change green to dark green. To make little dark i used hue vs luma. Then desaturate it by using hue vs saturation. But i think my grading is really ugly.

The best thing that i can do is using comparasion view like below. But this is not what i want.

Untitled.jpg

Thanks

==============
Okie Eko Wardoyo
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Editing , Effects and Titles , Error or problem

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 02, 2022 Apr 02, 2022

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This sort of work takes using the scopes to sort out. Most 'green foliage' has far more yellow than green ... really. To the eye you think you need to adjust the greens, but when you get an eyedropper on a point in the Curves tab's Hue vx Hue, it comes up way more yellow than you would think.

 

So check out the actual hue on the image you want to mimic. Maybe put a mask on a section of that image so that area is the only thing showing. Then put a mask on the area of your image you want to match to the other.

 

Now go into Comparison mode in side-by-side, with those two bits being all that is seen in the viewer. Check your Vectorscop YUV and the RGB Parade and see what is needed to match them.

 

Neil

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 02, 2022 Apr 02, 2022

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I would make a custom LUT

https://generator.iwltbap.com/

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Mentor ,
Apr 02, 2022 Apr 02, 2022

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if you look closely, almost everything becomes blue or a bluish tint except the skin tones. you may need to help out the grass a little with hue v hue, but I think most of the heavy lifting is simply done by off setting the white balance heavily toward blue and the skin tones are masked out (mostly). Then some simple contrast added.

 

you'd be surpised how many 'looks' even with big movies, is simply white balance shifted around.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 02, 2022 Apr 02, 2022

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So often, the shadows are heavily pushed towards cyan, the blues and green hues shifted in towards cyan. With the 'end' of that somewhere around the 50%/IRE point, the fadeout of the effect starts about 40%/IRE.

 

This avoids pushing the skin tones too far off-"skin" memory tones.

 

I've watched Volpatto and others note that they put the white point down to 5K/5500K to more closely match the white point of film, rather a warmer white than most video. Then they push the shadows towards cyan with the Shadow wheels control while simultaneously pushing the midtones the opposite direction to keep that cyan push down low.

 

Then go into the Hue v Hue controls to shift hues further. It's easier in Resolve where you can just add a qualifier to a node so it only affects X area/tones/hues. In Premiere, you either add a new instance of Lumetri to use the HSL tab to select only the shadow tones then do your shift.

 

Or do what I do frequently ... a Track Matte stack, using that effect to get control of say the shadow tones but the ability to use ALL the tools of Lumetri or even mulitple instances, all of them only affect the shadow tones.

 

At times I've set up to four Track Matte pairs ... copy the clip 'up' twice, set an HSL tab key in Lumetri on the V3 track leaving the mask on set to Color/Black. Then on the track just below, dropping the Track matte effect set to the track above and Luma. Now you add Lumetri to that track, and it only affects the area allowed by the key in the track above.

 

I've had four sets ... four pairs ... of tracks with four different areas of the image I'm working. Total of 9 tracks of the clip and it's copies, and this is how you work similar to adding nodes with qualifiers in Resolve.

 

Neil

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Mentor ,
Apr 02, 2022 Apr 02, 2022

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i agree, if you setup a luma matte, you can sometimes avoid having to mask. although perhaps 10-15% will still bleed through. it can be an acceptable solution. I only wish lumetri had built in luma and alpha controls. sometimes feels like fighting the 1990's.

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