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I have a problem with Premiere 2024, when exporting the movie, the full colors change on a Mac M2 de

New Here ,
Apr 03, 2024 Apr 03, 2024

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I have a problem with Premiere 2024, when exporting the movie, the full colors change on a Mac M2 device

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LEGEND ,
Apr 03, 2024 Apr 03, 2024

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That's at least two potential issues.

 

The first is simply that for some odd reason Apple chose to use the camera transform function specified in the Rec.709 standard ... as the display transform function. Which is absolutely "unique" and not done nor allowed in any broadcast/streaming/pro workflows.

 

To show how odd this is, Macs with "Reference Modes" when set to HDTV, use the correct, everywhere else in the world dislay transform. So some Macs use the odd thing, some don't. Oh ... joy.

 

The second potential issue is you may not have correctly set the myriad color management options now available in Premiere to what you need for your workflow. I'll cover that first.

 

Go to the Color Workspace, Lumetri panel, Settings tab. The one named Settings.

 

Diisplay Color management and for Mac users, Extended Dynamic range should be on. PCs ... can probably skip the extended range option.

 

Auto detect log and auto tonemapping are interactive and for nearly all users should both be ON. This will take your media, either HDR or SDR, and properly 'set' them for any sequence either HDR or SDR.

 

Set your sequence color space to that which you wish to export into! I still recommend SDR/Rec.709 for most users, as HDR is very much still the Wild Wild West. I work for/with/teach pro colorists, most of whom have yet to deliver a single paid job in HDR.

 

But if you want, HLG would be the choice for YouTube/Vimeo, and PQ the choice for projects that will go to other apps like AfterEffects or Resolve.

 

The export preset must match your sequence color space!!!!!!! This is one I see missed quite a bit. For Rec.709 sequences, use ONLY presets that do not have HLG or PQ in the preset name. For either HLG or PQ sequences, you must use presets with the same HDR format in the preset name.

 

The above will fix most everything but the odd thing of the display transform on Macs. You do have some control, but it is a pick your poison thing. 

 

Setting Viewer Gamma for Your Desired Outcome

 

As you can't make a file that will look the same with two widely different display transforms, you can only pick one. I'll give the options and the plus/minus things for each.

 

Viewer gamma 1.96/QuickTime

This sets the Program monitor to a similar display transform as used for Macs without Reference modes for Rec.709 media. 

 

Plus: your exported sequence will look very much the same outside of Premiere on a Mac without reference modes, and in QuickTime Player and Chrome and Safari browsers.

Minus: On all Macs with Reference modes set to HDTV, and all non-Mac devices, all broadcast spec systems and most TVs ... well, and even on Macs without reference modes in VLC and Firefox ... the image will be way dark and probably oversaturated.

 

Gamma 2.2/Web

This is used by some as an "in-between", as it will be lighter than a gamma 2.4 view, but not as light as a gamma 1.96 view. And it is used especially due to the common understanding that "the web is gamma 2.2" ... which is true for still images in sRGB. However, the testing I've seen shows that most web players still apply the 2.4 gamma to Rec.709 video images.

 

Plus: The image outside Premiere will be not as dark on a Mac without reference modes as if gamma 2.4 was used.

Minus: It won't be as seen on your system anywhere, but then, it never will be anyway, right?

 

Gamma 2.4/Broadcast

This is the option nearly all pro colorists use. For the very simple reason that all professionally produced media for broadcast/streaming is produced with gamma 2.4 in use and expected in the viewing system. So producing to that standard means that, in relative terms visually, on all devices, your media looks like other professionally produced media. 

 

Plus: Your media will look like other professionally graded media across platforms systems and such.

Minus: Yea, like all other professionally produced media, it will be lighter on Macs without reference modes in QuickTime player, Chrome and Safari browsers.

 

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