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Import & Export 120fps Footage in Premiere Pro

New Here ,
Jul 31, 2016 Jul 31, 2016

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Hi Everyone,

I would appreciate a clear answer:

Can I export 120fps footage in Premiere Pro (or using Adobe Media Encoder) as 120fps? I can't find a single option to set the frame rate to 120fps. Even if I "create sequence from clip" for a 120fps file, the "Sequence Settings" revert it back to either 60fps or 10fps, and then "match sequence settings" during export still exports it as 60fps.

I have a 144hz monitor and all I want to do is retain/keep my 120fps files without having to keep my raw files.

I don't want to export in anything other than 120fps.

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correct answers 1 Correct answer

Community Expert , Jul 31, 2016 Jul 31, 2016

Hi Mark:

You're currently limited to frames rates supported by professional formats for film and video.  So, 60.00 frames/second is the highest Timebase in Premiere Pro.

As I'm sure you've heard, footage is traditionally recorded at a higher frame rate like 120 or 240 for the purpose of achieving smooth slow motion without the video editing software needing to interpolate frames.  In film work, it's commonly referred to as "overcrankling" the camera (that is, shooting at a faster rate than normal)

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Community Expert ,
Jul 31, 2016 Jul 31, 2016

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Hi Mark:

You're currently limited to frames rates supported by professional formats for film and video.  So, 60.00 frames/second is the highest Timebase in Premiere Pro.

As I'm sure you've heard, footage is traditionally recorded at a higher frame rate like 120 or 240 for the purpose of achieving smooth slow motion without the video editing software needing to interpolate frames.  In film work, it's commonly referred to as "overcrankling" the camera (that is, shooting at a faster rate than normal).

You'll probably be good using a copy and paste editor like QuickTime Player X under Mac OS X (however, you give up having a timeline), but I haven't tried it myself.

If you just want to convert your files to a different format or CODEC, any of the Adobe Media Encoder presets where the frame rate is "based on properties of the source" should work.

-Warren

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New Here ,
Aug 01, 2016 Aug 01, 2016

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Thanks for the response. Tried multiple times in Media Encoder with "based on source" presets and no matter which one I select the file always comes out as 60fps. It doesn't make any sense (to my mind) for all applications to have this limitation.

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LEGEND ,
Aug 01, 2016 Aug 01, 2016

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There is no professional use for 120 fps except to slow it down, like Neil said.

So it wouldn't make sense for Adobe to spend limited resources coding their professional NLE to work any other way.

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Engaged ,
Dec 14, 2021 Dec 14, 2021

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I have personally been given 120 or 240 footage quite a few times, and it is often necessary to recompress the footage into the codec you are using, then import the footage and re-interpret it to the proper frame rate. Why should you not be able to recompress footage at it's original frame rate and not have it actually remove frames? Compressor will recompress 120 footage without a problem. Why shouldn't media encoder, especially when it works just fine in Media Encoder 2019, but was seemingly limited in 2020.

 

Also please add your name to this at Adobe User Voice about this. https://adobe-video.uservoice.com/forums/911308-media-encoder/suggestions/39164290-bug-prores-limite...


- Jonah Lee Walker
Video Editor, Colorist, Motion Graphics Artist

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New Here ,
Aug 09, 2022 Aug 09, 2022

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That is incorrect. We do full dome show and LED domes support 8K 120fps.
In fact 8K specs is 60 or 120fps. This 60fps limitation has to go.

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Contributor ,
Aug 26, 2016 Aug 26, 2016

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I actually have a professional need for a 120fps sequence/export and I'm looking for an NLE that is either HFR agnostic or has at least a 120fps preset.

AE is limited to 99fps. Media encoder will maintain the source rate so why not the products that use it? Anyway, I'll continue looking, but if anyone knows of an nle or effects program that does HFR I would like to know about it.

If you just want to convert footage, some codecs will Match Source for the 120fps frame rate. That's how I convert .h265 120fps to prores 120fps in Media Encoder (but not in Premiere).

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