• Global community
    • Language:
      • Deutsch
      • English
      • Español
      • Français
      • Português
  • 日本語コミュニティ
    Dedicated community for Japanese speakers
  • 한국 커뮤니티
    Dedicated community for Korean speakers

Is it possible to render a 90 minute sequence in sections?

Explorer ,
Nov 28, 2022 Nov 28, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I have a long sequence, about 90mins, 4K @60fps  , with a lot of tracks.

Rendering it has been very difficult and time consuming.

Does Premiere (or Media Encoder, or any other Adobe product) support a feature where I can render the video in say 15-minute chunks and then "stich them together" in the end? Or perhaps output in a single file but it starts where the last one left.

 

The actual mechanism doesn't matter to me, I'm willing to try anything as long as I can accomplish spreading out the render over multiple days without losing my progress.

 

Thank you!

TOPICS
Export , How to , Performance

Views

939

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines

correct answers 1 Correct answer

Community Expert , Nov 28, 2022 Nov 28, 2022

There are some things you could do to help with this. Smart Rendering would be one approach. 

 

If you want something a bit more tangible than video previews then you could essentially do what you are talking about: export out a ProRes 422 master in chunks, reimport those into your project and put them at the top of your video stack, and then by the time you are ready to export you are encoding from the master with all the processing baked in already.

 

Technically you could also mux those ProRe

...

Likes

Translate

Translate
Community Expert ,
Nov 28, 2022 Nov 28, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Have you tried creating subsequences?

 

Neil

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Explorer ,
Dec 03, 2022 Dec 03, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thanks @R Neil Haugen  Yes, I was hoping there would be something more natively supported.

I was thinking of basically manually setting the export in chunks, which would do the most expensive part of applying alsl the effects etc.

Then once I have all the chunks I'll reimport to a new project and that should render much faster as it would have a singele video track (and the audio ofc) with no effects. It seems, however, that this is kind of a half-conconcted way to do Smart Rendering. Unless you meant something else by subsequences.

P.S. In the meantime, my render has taken a lot less than I thought it would, about 12hours in total whereas I expected over 36 hours. 12 hours is reasonable enough for me to be able to do a few passes for the inevitable defects and fixes I'll need to apply (I had budgeted needing to render 3x after I was "done", I knew I'd find various editing or effect bugs once I watch the final product on a TV). 

But I think it's a good idea for me to adopt this Smart Rendering workflow for the future as long as the final result is the same. I have weird experiences with ProRes previews where they just look completely "off" from the final product in terms of color temperature and brightness/contrast, it's really bizarre...

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Dec 03, 2022 Dec 03, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Master PrPro user Jarle Leirpoll goes over a number of strategies in his marvelous and massive tome (1200 plus pages, either paper or ebook) .... The Cool Stuff in Premiere Pro ... the way he most recommends is actually creating segments of the project as separate sequences.

 

Then they are nested in the final, full-length sequence.

 

It makes it very organized, he can see every section of the story as its own bit, and polish each scene by itself. And very easy to move them all together for the final show. Well illustrated in his book. He does a lot of work for Scandinavian TV and other stuff across Europe, and typically has various producers concerned with this or that segment of the show. This makes it real easy to get to exactly the bit they're concerned about, among other things.

 

And then do a "smart render" to the same format/codec as the deliverable for each segment. Make sure the final sequence has all the latest versions ... and export. Which at that point is almost a momentary task. With everything pre-rendered, it's basically just stitching it all together and voila!

 

Neil

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Employee ,
Dec 05, 2022 Dec 05, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

k and Neil,

Nothing wrong with doing it this way. Walter Murch does. Try searching for a term he uses, "skinning" or adding a "skin." He uses an exported section of his timeline and then lays that on top of the clips. He can "cut the skin" and expose the underlying clips. This is sort of the same thing as smart rendering but with a safety valve. Smart rendering can be tough if you lose your render files or if they somehow break, which is very frustrating. 

 

Best Wishes,
Kevin

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Dec 05, 2022 Dec 05, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

LATEST

I've certainly done that before but I've never heard that term skinning, and cutting the skin. That's some evocative terminology, haha.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Nov 28, 2022 Nov 28, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

There are some things you could do to help with this. Smart Rendering would be one approach. 

 

If you want something a bit more tangible than video previews then you could essentially do what you are talking about: export out a ProRes 422 master in chunks, reimport those into your project and put them at the top of your video stack, and then by the time you are ready to export you are encoding from the master with all the processing baked in already.

 

Technically you could also mux those ProRes 422 masters together outside of Premiere as you stated in your post with software like FFMPEG or Shutter Encoder (an FFMPEG GUI). In either of the latter two scenarios you would have to be very meticulous in your work to make sure things are frame accurate.

 

Smart Rendering is a great workflow to know about and I use it all the time. I would whole-heartedly recommend it with the one small caveat that rarely, some users experience there previews not loading back in after restarting.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Explorer ,
Dec 03, 2022 Dec 03, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Interesting, so the smart rendering is basically exporing in a Pro Res format using the Previews you created during cut (as needed) and then transcoding to H.264 separately which would be significantly faster? I do see the partial Smart Rendering if I use proxies at even lower resolutions, which I do since my original footage is in 4K.

 

My issue is that ProRes looks dramatically different from the final H.264 product so I need to test if exporting to ProRes via previews and then transcoding that 'master' out to H.264 would produce the same result.

 

Thanks for sharing this, very interesting idea. I might mark your answer as the "correct" one. 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines