Mixing Sony XAVC S 4K footage with Ninja V ProRes 422 in same sequence causing major issues

Community Beginner ,
Feb 07, 2022 Feb 07, 2022

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I'm having issues with mixing XAVC footage shot on a Sony ZV-1 and ProRess 422 footage shot on Sony A7 IV recorded on Atomos Ninja V.  Exposure just gets all out of whack between the two clips.  Both cameras were shooting HLG3 picture profile with BT.2020 color space.  Individually, the footage looks good if it's in it's own sequence with it's own Lumetri color correction applied, but if I cut/paste the color-corrected footage from one sequence to another containing the other camera's footage, everything blows up.  

If I create a new sequence with the ZV-1 footage, the sequence defaults to Working Color Space: Rec. 2100 HLG. 

If I create a new sequence with the A7IV/Nina V footage, it defaults to Working Color Space: Rec. 709.

 

I'm guessing its a problem with the working color space mismatch in my workflow and that to correct this, I have to get the two different cameras footage working color space to "conform" with each other.  Any pointers on how to do this?

 

 

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Mentor ,
Feb 07, 2022 Feb 07, 2022

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 07, 2022 Feb 07, 2022

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What you're running into is the problems that Pr2022 is having "teething" on its brand-spanking-new totally rebuilt color system.

 

And one of the issues is it's having a whale of a time struggling with what is log-encoded Rec.709/SDR media, and what is truly HDR ... either HLG or PQ. You see, all HDR is log-encoded by nature, but though most SDR/Rec.709 is 'integer-encoded', some is log-encoded. And Premiere is having troubles with this, especially with some of the Panny DSLR/cam things, like the A7's.

 

If you go to the A7 clips in the Project panel bin, what do they show for color space in the properties? It could be either Rec.709 or HLG, truly. But it would be necessary to know.

 

If you go to the clips in the bin, right-click, Modify/Interpret Footage, can you set the Override to Rec2100 HLG? As that would fix things.

 

There are a couple cameras whose clips Pr does not allow us to override to anything, and that's ... a pain. And they're working at fixing it.

 

As so few of the colorists I work with daily has yet to produce a paid job in HDR, I'm curious ... what are you using this for? Fascinating to find out.

 

Neil

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Community Beginner ,
Feb 08, 2022 Feb 08, 2022

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Hi Neil - 

Thanks for the very helpful explanation.  I'll try your suggestions and report back. 

 

As for what I'm using it for... I'm simply recording in HLG3 to give me a little more latitude working with my footage... typically shooting corporate talking head videos, so nothing too fancy and not really much need for any color grading other than just making the footage look good.  I could probably just shoot with the plain movie/cinema picture profiles but I figured if the gear supports higher quality video using HLG3, why not give it a try.  The final vidoes are NOT going to be HDR, just run of the mill h264/h265 sitting on a corporate video streaming portal. 

 

-Mark

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Feb 08, 2022 Feb 08, 2022

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At this time, with so few apps/screens actually working in HDR, it's not necessarily handy to shoot it. The SDR will still look fine for quite some time, and is far easier and more reliable to work and deliver, no matter the app/browser/player/screen.

 

Neil

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Mentor ,
Feb 08, 2022 Feb 08, 2022

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if HLG does provide more dynamic range, perhaps you can encode the metadata differently with free shutter encoder and transform it to another codec and colorspace or gamma response and then maybe premiere won't act so strange.

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