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Motion Blur on footage with low lighting

New Here ,
Feb 08, 2024 Feb 08, 2024

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I filmed an interview in a low lighting situation with a Canon XA11 and i adjusted the shutter speed to try to make it more bright and it made the footage have motion blur. When the subject moves their hands it looks like there's a blur and the footage looks slow overall. Is there anything i can do within Adobe Premiere Pro to fix this or should i make it an audio only interview? Thanks - Gabriele

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Adobe Employee ,
Feb 28, 2024 Feb 28, 2024

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Hi Gabriele!

Thanks for writing in. Can you share a screen recording of the issue for better understanding?

 

Let us know. Happy to help.

KR

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LEGEND ,
Feb 28, 2024 Feb 28, 2024

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That's a difficult thing to fix after capture. You may, as I did, come into video from extensive stills experience. It's a whole different world ...

 

For exposure control in video, the only camera adjustment usable for scene brightness corrections is really the ISO setting.

 

Shutter speed controls motion blur ... how much is sharp, and what starts to blur a little bit. Normal suggestion is shutter speed as motion control is twice framerate. So, shooting a framerate of "24p" ... normally in reality 23.976 progressive ... double that to 48, take the closest shutter speed, typically 1/50th.

 

F-stop controls depth of sharp/acceptable focus ... and that is ALSO a biggie, and is why in video neutral density filters get so important!

 

In bright situations, you may need to keep the shutter to 1/50th, and want a depth of focus you'd get with say F4, or F5.6, maximum. You check histogram or the meter, and it's tellling you 1/100th second shutter at F16!

 

So you throw on several stops of ND filters to get the exposure down to 1/50th, F4.

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