• Global community
    • Language:
      • Deutsch
      • English
      • Español
      • Français
      • Português
  • 日本語コミュニティ
    Dedicated community for Japanese speakers
  • 한국 커뮤니티
    Dedicated community for Korean speakers

Need help with HDR video editing on a Windows 10 computer with Iphone 12 Pro material

New Here ,
Jan 16, 2023 Jan 16, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hey guys,

I got my very first Apple phone (an Iphone 12 Pro Max) and I’m trying to find a way to edit the HDR video material from my i-phone in Premiere Pro.

First of all, if I save my Iphone video files to my computer I have got two options: 

  1. Saving the HEVC file (HLG color space), which is HDR
  2. Saving the H264 (709 color space), which I get when I download the video file from I-cloud. This file shows the correct colors but has got no HDR.

Now I’m completely new to the “Apple world” (I don’t own anything from Apple, just that I-Phone now) and I have the problem that the video file (HEVC, HLG) shows extremely wrong and washed out colors in my premiere editing monitor. At first I thought it was just the fact that I don’t own a pc monitor screen that can show HDR but when I uploaded the film on youtube and watched that youtube video with my Iphone (that can show HDR), the colors were just as wrong as on my windows computer. I googled the problem on the apple websites and apple says that you have to download the youtube app and you can only upload the HDR videofile from your mobile to the youtube app. Allegedly only this way, HDR would work on youtube. Is that really true? Is there no way at all, to be able to edit HDR videos on a windows computer with Premiere Pro, then do my own color grading and then upload the file the classic way on Youtube or any other platforms? And will you never be able to see the full HDR if you don’t have a HDR computer screen? Because if that’s the case, I’d rather use the H264 (709) file for my editing so that I at least have the right colors (and I pass on HDR).

I imported both files in Premiere Pro and created screenshots to compare those files with the “original look” from my i-phone screenshot. There you can also see that the H264 file looks way better than the HEVC file even though it’s not HDR. The colors in the background are just wrong.

https://gyazo.com/55de60d22bf8493754d0231ccd67df06

I really hope that some of you guys know this problem and have found a solution.

TOPICS
Editing , Error or problem , Formats

Views

1.4K

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
New Here ,
Jan 16, 2023 Jan 16, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Oops sorry. I posted this before I signed my name. So thanks for reading and have a great day. 🙂

Julia

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Jan 16, 2023 Jan 16, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
New Here ,
Jan 16, 2023 Jan 16, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Like I wrote before, I can't see the hdr footage on my phone either, once I've edited it in Premiere Pro. Even though I export it in the same format as the original footage, the colors are all wrong, once I put it back on my i-phone.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
New Here ,
Jan 16, 2023 Jan 16, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

And same thing happens when I upload the HDR file on youtube. This has nothing to do with hdr screen or not, since I use my i-phone to watch the clip.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Jan 16, 2023 Jan 16, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

You need to read the links i gave you.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
New Here ,
Jan 16, 2023 Jan 16, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Those premiere export settings for hdr that are described in the link that you gave me didn't work for me. I have tried that last week already. I already read about those "hacks". Maybe I didn't do it right somehow, but I'm pretty sure I followed the exact instructions.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
New Here ,
Jan 16, 2023 Jan 16, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I will try it again with other footage. Maybe I have missed something.

Thank a lot for your time and support.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Jan 16, 2023 Jan 16, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Short story ... you gotta set your color management up correctly, and it's WAY MORE complex for HDR work.

 

IF you want to work in HDR, all the clips need to be in the same color space ... iPhones would be HLG ... and the working timeline color space needs to be set to HLG ... and anything else used on that sequence needs to be HLG color space ... and the export preset needs to have HLG in the preset name ... and your monitor/OS need to be capable of HDR/HLG work, and set so ... and your Premiere Pro Prefs need to be set for the right things too.

 

It's tempting, that's for sure, as the images can be stunning.

 

That said ... you may want to skip working in HDR for a while yet. It's the Wild Wild West out there ...

 

I work for/with/teach pro colorists. Some of whom were the earliest adopters of DolbyVision in pro color work, and Dolby hired to create the in-house Dolby training on doing DolbyVision HDR. So I've "been around" discussions of HDR workflows since it was possible.

 

Yet most pro colorists have still not delivered a single paid job in HDR. I think that will tip over the next year finally, but ... if most pro colorists haven't produced a paid gig yet, you might wonder ... why?

 

First, most screens out there either a) do not handle HDR forms at all or b) do so poorly, compared to their Rec.709 capabilities. That's concerning those who will view your final output.

 

Second ... to make it, at this time, is a total PITA. Because the vast majority of screens that you might be working on jack the color and brightness around on you for one of two reasons, and you have little control.

 

The first is "to enhance the viewing experience" ... and you may be able to disable those things ... if you know exactly where and how.

 

The second is ABL ... auto brightness limiting ... built into the system to protect the screen from pixel burnout. And you have either no control of that whatever to maybe some amount of control, unless you are on a Grade 1 Reference Monitor, a specific category of pro colorist gear, and well ... the cheapest full-on Ref monitor I know of is still over $10,000 USD ...

 

So to get around ABL, if you have the "technician's remote" for some TVs and monitors, you can get into special menus and reduce the funtion, but rarely eliminate it.

 

A recent House of Dragons episode was another long dark ep. And ABL killed that ep for quite a few users. Wait ... it's dark, wha'ts ABL doing? Well as it turns out, a LOT.

 

As most ABL systems only check for a sustained level of brightness for X time. And don't pay attention to what the level actually is. So ... a ten minute scene with top brightnesses at around 25 nits ... think 25 IRE on a Lumetri scopes realistically ... shouldn't involve the ABL as it's so dark you can't hardly see it anyway, right?

 

Wrong.

 

As one noted reviewer showed, on several different expensive HDR tv's, after a couple minutes the ABL kicked in and that 25 nit top brightness went down to 12 nits or so. Scale something down in the Lumetri scopes so the top 'white' brightness is 12 nits. Can you see anything ... anywhere?

 

How does this affect you in prepping HDR media? Your monitor will almost certainly do the same thing. So if you pause to check something, it will slowly drop brightness & contrast & sat to protect the screen.

 

And it is done intentionally slowly so you don't see it happening. And that makes it darn hard to really control what you're setting in as your "proper" brightnesses.

 

And that's only one of several "gotcha!" things I know of ... but if you want to go into HLG, I and other here can help ...

 

Neil

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
New Here ,
Jan 16, 2023 Jan 16, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hey Neil.

Thanks so much for your answer. I had no idea that this hdr workflow would be so complicated. Yet it's so incredibly interesting. I hope things will develop fast and that soon every monitor you can buy will have hdr. Then I'll be looking forward to work with it in the furture. But for now, I guess you're right that I should stick to 709. 🙂
Greets, Julia

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Community Expert ,
Jan 16, 2023 Jan 16, 2023

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

LATEST

I WANT to work with HDR. I've seen full-on pro level HDR on a couple top TVs and wow, it's ... awesome.

 

But at the moment, I can't justify the cost for a full working HDR setup. And so I'm pushing the colorists I know for news as various monitors come out with 'HDR capability' to find one I can afford that will work decently.

 

Currently, there's some monitors around $3500 or so that aren't ... too ... bad. Wouldn't work for full pro broadcast work, but for other, ok. And a couple TVs that can be fed from say an AJA or BlackMagic 'LUT' box output, and after calibration, don't do bad up to about 1,000 nits.

 

But again, there's about $1500 for the TV, then several hundred for the LUT box ... and I'd need to purchase probably ColourSpace to do the profile/make the LUT. For a number of hundred dollars each.

 

So I've simply "played" a bit with my BenQ PD2700U which can get only to about 350 nits anyway. But can "take" HDR/HLG signals. Not ... really the same, though, is it?

 

Neil

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
promo
COLLABORATION TIPS

Powerful video collaboration and approval features newly integrated in Premiere Pro