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Running time different in sequence timeline than original clip

Community Beginner ,
Nov 18, 2021 Nov 18, 2021

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I noticed something strange and can't figure it out. I have an mp4 file that is 85 minutes, 8 seconds when I open it in quicktime player. It is a file I have exported at 23.976 fps.

 

When I import it into Premiere and place it on a new sequence timeline, it matches the source clip's 23.976. But when I look on the timeline, it appears to be 5 seconds shorter, at 85 minutes, 3 seconds. 

 

What is happening? I need to turn in a transcript and total running time of the film, but I'm not sure which figure to use, what I see in quicktime (and vimeo and VLC) or the different time on my Premiere timeline. 

 

Any help is very much appreciated!! 

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Community Beginner ,
Nov 18, 2021 Nov 18, 2021

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I forgot to mention, if I export the file with 23.976 output, it still adds the 5 seconds to the what my timeline says...???

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 18, 2021 Nov 18, 2021

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Drop frame timecode or variable frame rate footage?

 

Try setting your framerate to 24fps or use Shutter Encoder to create a constant frame rate clip.

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Community Beginner ,
Nov 18, 2021 Nov 18, 2021

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Thanks, I don't understand how drop frame timecode or variable frame rate footage work, but it gives me a direction to research and try to figure out. 

 

When you say setting my framerate to 24fps, when/where? The sequence? Exporting? Appreciate your help.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 18, 2021 Nov 18, 2021

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Yes, try it from the Sequence Settings. Set it to 24 fps. Post a screen shot of it.

 

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Community Beginner ,
Nov 19, 2021 Nov 19, 2021

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Thank you so much for your help. I created both a 24fps and a 23.976 sequence, placed the film clip on there, and on the Premiere timelines, the 5-second difference in running time is there. 

 

23.976fps sequence: running time 85:03

24 fps sequence: running time 85:08

 

When I export to h264 files, this is the result:

 

23.976fps export: running time 85:08

24 fps export: running time 85:08

 

Both of the files end up the same length, 85:08. When I check the two clips, they correspond exactly frame by frame throughout. Is this the true running time? 

 

And, does that mean when I export a 23.976 file, it automatically shifts the time code to make up for the remaining .014 frames per second? So, I shouldn't trust the 23.976 timeline as exact? 

 

This is so weird and I never encoutnered this issue until I made this feature film where it was noticeable and I'm being asked for very exact transcript and running time.

 

I'm including screenshots, in case they help illustrate. Thanks again!

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 18, 2021 Nov 18, 2021

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you can also use Handbrake to change variable frame rate footage to constant framerate

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 19, 2021 Nov 19, 2021

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Yes, it's correct. 23.97 uses a drop-frame to keep the time exactly to the clock. Broadcasters use it as they know a 22 minute segment with drop-frame time code runs 22 minutes. Without the dropped frame it looks a tiny bit longer, since there are no frames dropped in the count. However, they remain the same actual length. 

 

I do very little work for broadcast, therefore I always use non-drop frame, and did back in the old-school days of tape and time-code generators. Many people do, as there are no 'issuses' of a missing frame number and the absolute length was not an issue.

 

The drop frame length is correct to the stopwatch. Well done!

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