Slowdowns or lag in the playback of transitions

Explorer ,
May 04, 2022 May 04, 2022

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HI, i work on PC with Premiere pro 22 on Windows 11 21H2, Cpu Intel i9 7320X, 64 gb ram, 2 Geforce 1080TI in SLI, when i play the timeline with HD (1920 x 1080) or 4k (3860 x 2140) video everything is fine (yellow timeline line) but when it gets to the point of a "cross dissolve or dissolve to withe" transition the timeline playback slows down, it goes to shots.

Why does this happen? how can i fix it?

Thanks for reply

 

 

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Editing , Error or problem , Performance

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 04, 2022 May 04, 2022

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check project settings - renderer

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 04, 2022 May 04, 2022

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When you get to a transition point where you are showing two video clips you are now decoding multiple video streams simultaneously. So it sounds like your computer is able to keep up with the decoding (playback) of one stream, but not two (although this doesn't necessarily apply to a dissolve to white/black.)

 

Definitely check out the renderer situation as already posted about, especially given the dip to white issue, but a couple of considerations when it comes to multiple video streams:

Bitrate & Drive Speed: Depending on the speed of your drives and the bitrate of your media you could be saturating the I/O bandwidth when trying to pipe through multiple videos simultaneously.

Video Codec: Difficult to decode video codecs like H264 or H265 will make pretty much everything slow down. This is a situation where your computer could be maybe keeping up with one, but two becomes too much to handle (this isn't an insult to your hardware, and hardware is only half the battle anyway. This is just how these video codecs work.) So, anything coming on top of a poor editing codec will suffer: multiple streams, VFX, color correction, etc. It's all made more difficult because the codec requires extra processing to "figure out," before the computer can move on to processing the effects.  

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Explorer ,
May 05, 2022 May 05, 2022

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Hi thank you for reply,

1) my clip are recorded with Panasonic G5, mov 4K (3860x2140) H264-MPEG4 AVC with 150000 of bitrate and 50 fps, and i work them in a progressive full HD (1920x1080) sequence.

2) What do you mean when you say to check the render?

3) Since H264/265 are not optimal, what is the best format video to make the most of Premiere with running speed? 

  1. Apple Prores HQ
  2. MPEG2
  3. Other

Thanks!

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