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WORKING COLOR SPACE ISSUE

Community Beginner ,
Feb 08, 2024 Feb 08, 2024

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I HAVE CANON R3 FOOTAGES IN 4K HDR PQ..SO I SELECT WORKING COLOR SPACE 2100 PQ

I EDIT THE FOOTAGES..WHEN I EXPORT THE FOOTAGES IN 2100 PQ DIDNT GET SAME COLOR....GOT TO MUCH SATURAIONS OUTPUT ..ANY SOLUTION ?

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LEGEND ,
Feb 08, 2024 Feb 08, 2024

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First ... please! ... typing in all-caps is considered shouting and very rude.

 

Next, you don't say how your Color Management options are set, nor what your export preset was, nor what your OS and monitor are.

 

Color Workspace, Lumetri panel's new Settings tab has all the CM functions in one place.

 

What are yours set to?

 

Auto detect log and auto tonemap are interactive, and for most users, should be 'on'.

 

Display Color Management should be on, and "Extended Dynamic Range ... " definitely should be on for all Mac users.

 

For that format, the sequence should be set to Rec.2100/PQ, and the export preset used must have PQ in the preset name.

 

Next ... the monitor or TV has to be able to 'recognize' PQ for playback of the export outside Premiere. Many do not have that capability.

 

BTW ... I work for/with/teach PRO colorists, most of whom have yet to deliver a single paid HDR job. Some of the people I work with were hired by DolbyLaboratories to create the in-house tutorial videos on working with DolbyVision in Resolve. These are people based in Resolve or Baselight, and if Resolve, working on the $30,000 "Advanced" control panel, probably with a Flanders or Sony reference monitor they paid $20K to $35K for.

 

But most screens out there In The Wild still do not have actual HDR capabilities. And for those that do, they offer "support for ..." only a few of the many different forms. And very few of them handle HDR well without extensive calibration routines.

 

Especially at this time, ABL ... automatic dimming, essentially, is still a problem. You can't turn this completely off in most monitors or TVs, and as it slowly dims or brightens the screen in the background, you can't see it "working" either. So ... grading with a screen that dims and brightens on it's own is gonna suprise you at times. NOT good.

 

Over the next couple years that will change. We ... hope. But at this time, HDR is definitely a less than guaranteed experience. Although ... so tempting! The first time I saw my work on a proper HDR reference monitor was the 2019 NAB/Vegas, where I was a speaker in the MixingLight/Flanders FSI booth ... and our presentations were all on a 36" $32k monitor ... and oh ... my ... wow.

 

PQ is more of a technical delivery format at this time. Very few monitors or TVs can show it. So it is primarily the option to export media for use by another video post worker. Someone who's going to composite or grade the media.

 

HLG is the far more common "deliverables" format of the limited options in Premiere. More screen can show this one. 

 

You can do HDR10, starting with a PQ sequence and PQ export, if you turn on the HDR10 metadata switch in the preset. Some monitors/TVs do HDR10 but not PQ or HLG ... yea, it's tough out there!

 

But not HDR10+, which takes dynamic metadata ... metadata in the file that changes through the file. Premiere doesn't do that anlysis bit yet.

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